• Italian? Check. V12? Check. Orange? Check. This Aventador ticked all the boxes for a place on Simon George’s supercar experience fleet. And it means he also has a new daily driver.

    NEW ARRIVAL #Lamborghini-Aventador-LP700-4 / #Lamborghini-Aventador / #Lamborghini / #2016 / #Lamborghini-V12 / #V12

    Date acquired April #2016
    Total km 38,653
    Km this month 911
    Costs this month $0
    L/100km this month 22.0

    For most businesses, sinking the best part of three quarters of a million dollars into new machinery is a pretty significant decision. When that machinery happens to be a #V12-engined #Lamborghini , it’s one you want to be particularly sure of.

    Only a tiny minority of the 6th Gear Experience’s 45,000 annual customers are actually petrolheads. The overwhelming majority are members of the public who have been bought a driving experience as a gift. This means most aren’t quite sure which supercar is which, although a Ferrari has to be red and any Aston Martin is usually associated with James Bond. That said, there are some cars that most customers instantly recognise as something special. The Ferrari 458 Italia is one, a big V12 Lambo another. Anything with doors that go upwards always goes down a storm. Throw in a bright colour and you have the pulling power of a bikini-clad Kelly Brook stood amongst a line of smartly attired fashion models.

    Enter the Aventador LP700-4. Another Sant’Agata supercar had been on the cards for some time. Prices, though, have recently firmed up, with even the earliest Aventadors seldom dropping below $600,000 (they cost $760K new).

    It was a tip-off through a main dealer that led us to LJ12 KJZ, which was a bit leggy at 38,000km but had a full Lamborghini service history complete with every invoice. And it was the right colour and sported a plain black interior. Not my personal preference, but spot-on for what we needed it for. Additionally, the carbon-ceramic brakes had recently been replaced at an eyewatering $30,000. Regular readers may remember my thoughts on ceramics, which work well for an owner who is familiar with how they behave but are not ideal for use by a customer who isn’t – and that’s even with an experienced instructor in the passenger seat with their own stop pedal. So whether the ceramics stay, we’ll have to see.

    After a lengthy inspection, a deal was struck at $590,000 and within 24 hours our new leviathan was negotiating its way at speed around Castle Combe. And I really do mean speed – 515kW propels just 1575kg for a power-to-weight ratio that matches a Carrera GT’s.

    First impressions? It’s difficult to write anything that hasn’t been said before, of course, but compared with the Murciélagos we have run in the past, the Aventador unsurprisingly feels punchier, although both models seem to have almost identical all-wheel-drive handling characteristics. I’m guessing that with its more modern driver aids it’ll look after you better than the older car in a crisis, too. It’ll be interesting to see how the Aventador copes on a wet track. On the road it certainly generates overwhelming attention, which as many supercar owners will confirm is great at first but can become tiring in the long term.

    With the imminent return (yes, I know, I’ve been saying this for months) of the monster-mileage Murciélago, too, it looks like the future is bright. Orange, too…