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    Track beckons for new Continental GT / #2018 / #Bentley-Continental-GT / #2018-Bentley-Continental-GT / #Bentley / #Bentley-Continental-GT3

    Sub-1300kg, 550bhp, #V8-powered racer revealed hot on the heels of new Bentley road car
    Bentley is taking the Continental GT to the track in #2018

    It took Bentley a decade to get its original Continental GT out of the paddock and onto the track, but a GT3 racing version of the new Conti GT will line up on the grid at Monza in 2018 within a couple of months of the first road cars being delivered. And it has a lot to live up to. The original Continental GT3 race car racked up 528 races, 120 podiums and 45 wins during its short, four-year life. And with GT3 racing becoming evermore competitive, the new Bentley contender can’t afford the smallest confidence lift on its way into the first corner.

    To create their second-generation GT3 racer, Bentley’s motorsport engineers and Malcolm Wilson’s M-Sport – the race team charged with running the cars – started out with the new Conti GT road car. Job one was to shed over 850kg to give a sub-1300kg race-ready weight.

    Ditching the hand-finished interior accounted for most of that mass, but the use of carbonfibre for the non-structural body panels and other body parts (front splitter, rear wing, arch extensions) also contributed to shedding the pounds, as did the loss of the front driveshafts – the racer is rear-wheel drive. Hours in the wind tunnel have dictated its aggressive aero package, which hangs from the road car’s new Porsche Panamera-derived aluminium structure.

    Rather than the road car’s W12 , the racer will feature a development of the 4-litre twin-turbo V8 that served the team so well over the last four seasons. Updates for 2018 include a redesigned dry sump and new inlet and exhaust systems. Bentley claims its unrestricted output is ‘in excess of 550bhp’.

    Drive is delivered via a six-speed sequential gearbox, a carbon propshaft and a limited-slip differential. The suspension is all-new and so, too, are the six- and four-piston (front/rear) #Alcon brake calipers and iron discs.

    For 2018 a pair of Continental GT3s will race in the #Blancpain-GT-Series-Endurance-Cup as well as the four-round Intercontinental GT Challenge. With the driver line-up yet to be confirmed, evo is prepared to throw its Arai into the mix. It’s the least we can do while we wait for the GT3-inspired Continental Supersports road car to arrive.
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    There’s no denying this was a strange looking one, but powered by a big V8 and four-wheel drive it would have been a hoot to drive we reckon. BMW Concepts A look on the rather unusual #V8-powered Z18 from 2000. / #BMW-Z18-Concept / #1995-BMW-Z18-Concept / #BMW-Z18 / #BMW-Concept / #BMW / #V8 / #1995 / #BMW-V8 /

    No roof, four-wheel drive, a 4.4-litre V8 making 355hp and a manual gearbox? This had real potential to be a lot of fun!

    BMW CONCEPTS: The cars they could have made Z18

    When a manufacturer goes to the effort of creating a concept car it’s usually immediately displayed to the public at the nearest upcoming motor show. This is done to seem like the company is pushing ahead, showing off some outside, innovative thinking whilst offering a glimpse into future styling ideas. So on that basis the Z18 concept was a little odd as it made its debut to the public in 2000, some five years after it was built. Even then it only saw the light of day to mark an occasion; the 15th birthday of BMW Technik Gmbh which is the creative team behind most of the concept cars.

    Inspired by the company’s success of the Enduro motorcycles of the 1990s the idea was to create a car counterpart. It was designed as what is best described as a research project, centred around the concept of providing driving pleasure in an unusual way. Or as #BMW described it: “The yearning to explore off-road terrain and the pleasure of mobility under the open skies was combined for the first time on four wheels.”

    That essentially meant creating an #off-road , highly robust roadster that was constructed from a steel chassis and fitted with a plastic body. What you see is what you get; there was no roof although it did apparently have holes in the floor to let any water filter out! Its styling also seems to share a passing likeness to the BMW Z1, but then they were created at the same sort of time by the same design team. Being four-wheel drive it’s safe to assume the running gear was largely borrowed from the X5 that was in development and due to be released in 1999.

    But best of all was the engine, as BMW had selected to create quite a nippy number thanks to the use of a 4.4-lite V8 making 355hp and it was coupled to a manual gearbox! With no roof and not a whole lot of weight that would have made the Z18 good fun to drive, especially off road we reckon!

    It was a practical concept, too, as the inside was described by BMW as incorporating “…a variable interior concept and elevated seating to characterise the innovative driving experience…” The variable part is what made it interesting as it was suggested the cabin could offer two- and four-seater configurations as well as a pick-up style option if required.

    The project obviously never got off the ground and as mentioned, for some reason or another, BMW didn’t even attempt to display it, which seems a shame. You could argue the sports utility concept of the Z18 was turned down a few notches but embraced with the introduction of the X6 and the like, so perhaps the ill-fated 1995 concept did do some lasting good. However, even a lightweight roofless X6 is a long way off this…
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    FIRST WORDS
    First things first, we begin this issue with an announcement: we have new bosses as PBMW now belongs to Kelsey Media Ltd, whereas before we were owned by Unity Media Plc. Obviously what you’re interested in is how this affects you, and it’s all good news. Most importantly, #PBMW isn’t going anywhere so you’re still going to get your regular modified BMW fix, no worries there, and while both cover and subscription prices have been adjusted you’re now getting 13 issues a year rather than 12, as the magazine will now be on sale every four weeks rather than once a month. This means even more modified #BMW goodness to wrap your reading gear around throughout the year. No complaints then!

    Hopefully January didn’t drag you down too far and you’re on the up, getting excited about the prospect of warmer weather and hitting the shows. Got exciting new plans? New wheels? New paint? Ready to go or still planning? Whatever your situation, we can’t wait to see what’s new on the BMW scene once show season kicks off.

    As for the right now, you’ve got the March issue in your hands to put a smile on your face and it’s packed full of awesomeness. Where to begin? How about with our cover car? Griot’s-Motors rocked SEMA with its insane E30 Touring and now it’s here to rock your world. This two-door, #V8-powered , M3-bodied machine is unlike anything we’ve ever seen and it’s an incredible build from top to bottom. We’ve also got 2M Autowerks’ awesome E46, which started out life as a 330Ci but now boasts a custom metal wide-body rear end, sits on HRE splits and then there’s the small matter of that S54 swap. Closer to home there’s an insane, #BMW-S62 #V8-swapped E34 drift beast, a wild 476hp 135i, and a super-clean E36 Touring for you to enjoy, plus our Car of the Year results!

    In fact, there’s so much to enjoy that we should stop wasting time with idle chat and let you get on with reading the issue. We’ll see you next month.

    Griotʼs-Motors two-door #BMW-E30 / #BMW-V8 / #BMW-Touring / #BMW-E30 / #BMW-3-Series / #BMW-3-Series-E30 / #BMW-3-Series-Touring / #BMW-3-Series-Touring-E30 / #BMW / #Griot's-Garage / #BMW-E30-Griotʼs-Motors / #BMW-Touring-2-door / #BMW-E30-M60 / #BMW-E30-V8 / #Getrag / #HRE /
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    PASSION WAGON #BMW-M3

    Griot’s Motors unleashes its V8-powered, two-door, #BMW-M3-bodied E30 #BMW-M3-Touring . Two-door, M3-bodied, #V8-powered E30 Touring.

    Astonishing in its vision, astounding in its execution, just plain awesome by its very existence, the Griot’s Motors two-door, #V8-swapped , #M3-bodied E30 #BMW-M3-Touring-E30 is quite unlike anything we’ve ever seen… Words: Elizabeth de Latour. Photos: Kevin Uy.

    What’s amazing about the modified BMW scene is that, just when you think you’ve seen it all, someone comes along and produces something the likes of which you’ve never seen before. It’s no mean feat, and you’re looking at one such creation right now. It is a two-door, #M3-bodied-E30-Touring powered by a 4.0-litre M60 V8. This creation is the brainchild of the Griot’s (pronounced Gree-oh’s) Motors team, itself the skunkworks division of Griot’s Garage – a car care manufacturing company based over in Tacoma, Washington, USA. If you’ve never heard of Tacoma, look up Galloping Gertie, an infamous bridge that collapsed in 1940 due to strong winds. And if you’ve never heard the term skunkworks before, it’s basically a name given to an experimental department of a company.


    Griot’s Motors was started by Richard and Phillip Griot. “The garage buys, sells, restores and modifies a wide variety of classic cars,” says Nick Griot. “Our main restoration shop is actually part of the Griot’s Garage headquarters.” Skunkworks it may be but Griot’s Motors is an impressive operation in itself, with around 70 cars currently held in the company’s collection, which is constantly changing as cars are completed, sold on and new ones purchased. BMWs naturally make up a portion of this collection, with a number of modern and classic examples along with a couple of motorbikes. “BMWs have always been of interest to us as they represent a perfect blend of design and function which carries through to the people who buy them,” explains Nick.

    “BMW owners are passionate about racing, preserving, modifying and maintaining their cars – which is pretty much us in a nutshell. Griot’s Garage is also the exclusive Car Care Provider for the BMW Car Club of America so we are actively invested in the BMW community and do a lot with the club every year.”

    That’s all well and good but it doesn’t explain how this insane E30 Touring came about. “At Griot’s Motors we basically focus on modernising cars without losing any of their vintage attributes,” explains Nick. “And we are constantly looking for unique, hard-to- find cars. This was a car we wanted to own just because we finally could. E30 Tourings were never imported to the States and, generally, a car must be over 25-yearsold to be able to be imported and registered. We found this car for sale in Florida and it had made its way there from Germany via Japan. It was in good original condition, and very complete, so we bought it thinking it would remain relatively stock and would be enjoyed as it was. However, once we got the car and saw the wear and tear and significant paint degradation we knew it was in need of restoration, which is where we went a little mad and cooked up a crazy vision for the car – one that had never been done before.”


    The blame for everything that you see here can really be placed on Richard’s shoulders, as Nick explains: “After sitting in the car he stated that visibility was not up to his standards and he wondered aloud about the potential of longer doors from an E30 Coupé to improve visibility. That started the discussion of the two-door conversion, which led us all the way to M3 body work, an engine swap, and custom fabrication.”

    The bodywork didn’t come first, though, that honour goes to the engine, but it’s too big a deal for us not to get excited about it. The sheer amount of extensive custom fab work that’s gone into making the dream a reality is mind-boggling. With the seed sown, the Griot’s Motors team started exploring the idea of the two-door conversion and, after taking some measurements from their pair of E30 M3s, they realised that the M3 bodywork would work very well. With what might seem like an insane idea now looking eminently achievable the car was delivered to J-Rod & Custom who began the Herculean task of turning four doors into two and making it all look like a factory job.

    The B-pillar had to be moved back nine inches in order to be able to accept the longer doors. A completely custom frame had to be built into the space vacated by the rear doors. And new inner wheel wells were created to accommodate the wider M3 rear arches (the quarter panels having been sourced from Germany). The rear light housings had to be modified to fit the standard light clusters, new window trim was also created and the glass from the rear saloon doors was used between the B- and C-pillar. The front arches fitted straight on and all the remaining body parts are OE #BMW items with bumpers and side skirts acquired from local BMW enthusiasts. The finishing touch involved six coats of PPG Deltron Griot’s Red. The end result is nothing short of spectacular. Nick says the goal was to create a car that looked like a factory product, and that’s been achieved and then some. The bodywork is perfect, the paint finish flawless, and the combination of Touring body, two-door configuration, and M3 arches is breathtaking. No doubt there are plenty of Touring enthusiasts out there choking with rage right now but you’d have to be a fool to look at this E30 and think it doesn’t look anything less than perfect.

    As we briefly touched upon earlier, the engine was actually the first step in the build process and, when it came to the V8 swap, the Griot’s team worked to the same exacting, obsessive standards to ensure that, bonnet up, the engine bay would leave onlookers as floored as the rest of the car. Before all this madness began there was a 2.5-litre M20 under the bonnet but that simply wouldn’t do for a car of this calibre, which is why an engine swap was a necessity. The engine in question is from a #1995 E34 540i, purchased in its entirety to provide the E30 Touring with not only that lusty 4.0-litre #V8 but also a six-speed manual gearbox and engine wiring harness, making for an easy engine exchange, with the V8 sitting on custom mounts along with a fabricated transmission saddle and tunnel reinforcement to support it. But the engine swap itself isn’t the only impressive part, it’s the work that’s gone on around it, the attention to detail, that impresses the most. Prior to the insertion of the V8, the engine bay was shaved and smoothed to remove any and all holes and brackets. “The plan,” says Nick, “was to have an extremely simple engine bay that showed off the most beautiful aspects of the engine without the clutter of wiring and engine accessories.”


    The brake booster, he says, was removed and has been replaced with a full pedal assembly inside the car and then reservoirs were fabricated in-house for coolant, brake/clutch, and power steering fluids.

    These were then machined with threads that corresponded with the factory reservoir caps, giving the custom parts a factory appearance. As a result of this painstaking attention to detail the engine bay is nothing short of a work of art. It’s clean enough to eat your dinner off and it ensures that all eyes are immediately drawn to that V8, itself embellished with red painted rocker covers and a classic BMW roundel on the engine cover. A custom cold air feed, utilising a large velocity stack located in the passenger side high beam hole and an in-line filter, supplies the big V8 with all the air it can ingest. Elsewhere the Griot’s team has fitted V8 X5 exhaust manifolds with a custom T304 stainless steel exhaust system, while a custom driveshaft and 2.93 LSD-equipped rear end have also been fitted.

    Killer one-off styling and a sweet engine swap are all well and good but it’s only a job half done where a major project like this is concerned. Now came the turn of the chassis to be comprehensively overhauled. Step one involved removing the front and rear subframes and completely refreshing them, with both being reinforced in key areas before being powdercoated satin black. The E30 received polybushes throughout and camber adjustment was added to the rear trailing arms. “The front strut assemblies were sent to Ground Control and the guys there worked their magic, shortening and reinforcing the strut housings so we could get the car as low as we wanted,” explains Nick. “They also provided us with the Koni shocks, front camber plates, spring perches, and new springs that would accommodate the increase in weight from the V8.”

    With the Ground Control coilover setup endowing the E30 with pretty much the perfect ride height, all that was needed now was the perfect set of wheels to adequately fill those swollen arches. You’ve no doubt been staring at the pictures for a while now so you’ve probably identified what the Griot’s Motors team decided to fit: HREs. Is it wrong to get excited about HREs? Like, really, really excited? They just look so good here. Choosing a flat-faced wheel rather than the default dished design is a bit of a ‘woah’ moment but, despite being a thoroughly modern wheel, the classic crossspoke design brings to mind the BBSs that the E30 M3 originally wore so well. And that’s exactly why these 501Ms were selected for this build. They allowed the Griot’s team to keep that factory look while giving them the modern size and width options they wanted for an aggressive stance. And while deciding on the final colour took some time, the brushed gold that was chosen is not only gorgeous but a perfect match for that bright red body.

    Right now, you’re probably reeling because, let’s be honest, there’s a hell of a lot to take in here, but Griot’s isn’t finished with you just yet because now we come to the interior. And, well, it’s a bit special. Up front, the M3 theme has been carried over from the outside with reproduction tricolour M Tech cloth applied to the doorcards and front seats, a retrimmed M Tech I steering wheel with tricolour stitching, and an M gear knob.

    In the back, however, well that’s where everything goes crazy. The rear passenger and luggage area has been transformed into a mobile product display and valeting station: this is a car that can wash itself.

    Well, not literally, but you know what we mean. The rear seats have been replaced with a custom aluminium water tank and hose while the entire boot has been fitted with a custom enclosure that allows the entire range of Griot’s Garage detailing products and polishers to be displayed. The whole affair has been beautifully finished and looks magnificent. It’s a very different boot build to the ones we’re used to seeing but no less impressive.

    The Griot’s Motors E30 Touring is the vehicular embodiment of what Griot’s Garage and its skunkworks outfit stand for. It’s an incredible creation, one that’s come about from the vision and imagination of a small group of guys and one that could only have been created by people with nothing less than absolute passion for cars and for modifying them – because what kind of person decides to build a two-door Touring?

    So much care and attention has been poured into not just making sure that the end result looks absolutely perfect, which it does, but also making sure that everything has been built to the highest possible standard and finished to absolute perfection. The goal was to make a car that looked like it could have rolled out of BMW’s own factory, and this car is that and so much more. And beyond showcasing what Griot’s Motors is capable of creating, the on-board valeting station showcases what Griot’s Garage is all about. This really might be the cleanest car we’ve ever shot. Best of all, this Touring isn’t about to be tucked away or sold, it’s going to be hitting the 2017 shows across the USA. And after that it’s going into rotation for regular driving whenever anyone wants to because, after all, that’s what it was built for. And that makes us very happy indeed.

    “We went a little mad and cooked up a crazy vision for the car – one that had never been done before”

    DATA FILE #Griotʼs-Motors two-door #BMW-E30 / #BMW-V8 / #BMW-Touring / #BMW-E30 / #BMW-3-Series / #BMW-3-Series-E30 / #BMW-3-Series-Touring / #BMW-3-Series-Touring-E30 / #BMW / #Griot's-Garage / #BMW-E30-Griotʼs-Motors / #BMW-Touring-2-door / #BMW-E30-M60 / #BMW-E30-V8 / #Getrag / #HRE /


    FILE ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION 4.0-litre #V8 #BMW-E30-M60B40 / #M60B40 / #BMW-M60 / #M60 , custom engine mounts, rocker covers painted red, engine bay shaved and smoothed, custom coolant and power steering reservoirs, tucked wiring harness, custom cold air feed from full beam headlight hole, X5 exhaust manifolds, custom #T304 stainless steel dual 2.5” exhaust, #Getrag six-speed manual gearbox, fabricated transmission saddle, tunnel reinforcement, custom propshaft, 2.93 LSD rear end

    CHASSIS 8x17” (front) and 9x17” (rear) #HRE-501M wheels in brushed gold with 215/40 (front) and 235/40 (rear) Falken Azenis RT615K tyres, reinforced subframes, fully polybushed, rear trailing arm camber adjustment, shortened and reinforced front strut housings, fully-adjustable #Ground-Control coilovers with adjustable #Koni struts, camber plates

    EXTERIOR Full OEM steel E30 M3 body panels including front and rear quarter panels, E30 coupé doors, side skirts, M3 bumpers (front and rear), full respray in #PPG-Deltron Griot’s Red

    INTERIOR Seats and door panels retrimmed in reproduction M Tech cloth, retrimmed M Tech I steering wheel, six-speed M gear lever, new OE carpet, rear seats removed, custom aluminium water tank and hose, water jet-cut product display area in boot

    THANKS Thank you to our sponsors, HRE Wheels, Brembo Brakes and Ground Control Systems. Thank you to J-Rod & Custom, McFarland Upholstery, Kassel Performance, Falken Tire and the hard work of Forrest Davis and Tim Willard of Griot’s Motors – without them, this project would have never been completed

    “The plan was to have an engine bay that showed off the most beautiful aspects of the engine”

    Shaved and smoothed bay ensures that all eyes are on that V8 when the bonnet’s up.
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    Mild-mannered 120d transformed into #V8-powered 1M Monster.
    SMASHING! Body shock!

    What started out life as a humble #BMW-120d is now unrecognisable following its transformation into an awesome V8-powered 1M, finished in Java green and with an M DCT gearbox. From mild-mannered 120d to hulking V8-powered 1M, this 1 Series has undergone an incredible transformation and the results are astonishingly spectacular. Words: Elizabeth de Latour. Photos: Matt Woods.

    Subtle is fine. Subtle works when you just want to get on with stuff discreetly, blending into the background and going unnoticed and unbothered. But sometimes, you need to be unsubtle. Sometimes you need something to wake you up from the dull, grey drudgery of life. Sometimes you need a Java green V8-powered smack in the mouth. That time is now.

    One might argue that Nina Barber’s 1M is subtle; there is, for example, no wild wing, no outrageous wheels, no vents or bulges beyond those which the 1M was created with, and even the exhaust is surprisingly civil. But a 1M finished in shocking green, and it really is very green, with a V8 numberplate is car that wears its heart on its sleeve. And we’re all for that.

    Nina is a woman who grew up in an environment filled with people passionate about cars, so it’s easy to how she’s ended up here, talking to us about her V8 1M. “I started to become passionate about cars in my early 20s,” she says. “My uncle races Porsches, my dad has always been into Lamborghinis and American muscle cars, and my mum has always had BMWs – which is what got me into the marque. She had an E30 when I was born followed by some M models. I remember the first time I drove a BMW, her BMW, I felt at home and knew that’s where I belonged. My first BMW was a 130i, which replaced an MX-5. That was a lot of fun to drive but I wanted more power and speed and after driving my mum’s 130i I knew I had to have one. After the 130i I bought a Z4 M, a car I’d always wanted as whilst I was growing up my mum owned a Roadster. It was very nice but compromised. So I started thinking about what to get next?

    An S54 Z3 M or E46 M3 CSL? Maybe, but prices were so high and you can’t put miles on those cars without harming their value, and while I’ve always loved the E92 M3 I prefer smaller cars…” We think you can see where this is going.

    “I followed Sebastian online. He owned the blue V8 1M that Ashley at Quarry Motors had built and originally owned, and I realised that was the car I wanted. I approached him about buying it and it turned out he was emigrating so it seemed like the perfect opportunity. Unfortunately we didn’t have much time to try and arrange a sale and it fell through but a friend of mine knew the guys at Quarry so approached them on my behalf to see if they’d be willing to build another V8 1M. I travelled up to Sheffield, met Ashley, had a chat and decided on the spot to go ahead with the project.” For this build, Nina was very specific about what she wanted, a fullyloaded car with DCT. The following day, the perfect M3 donor car showed up on Quarry’s doorstep. The planets had aligned…

    The car you see before you started out life as a 120d; the original Quarry car was built from a written-off 118d, but Nina wanted hers to be built from a straight car and it was actually sourcing the right 1 Series to build on that took some time. The entire project was handled by Ashley at Quarry from start to finish, leaving Nina to concentrate on working out the particulars.

    The most stressful part of the whole build was trying to decide on a colour. “I’ve never been so indecisive about anything in my life!” she exclaims. “I must have changed my mind about 20 times. Initially I considered a Lamborghini colour, then a Porsche colour, but then I decided I wanted a BMW colour. For ages I was set on Taiga green but after seeing James’ Java green M4 at a show I instantly knew that was the colour I wanted.

    Taiga is nice but it’s paler and is better suited to a boxy classic car. Java is perfect for a modern shape like the 1 Series and really suits the car.” She’s not wrong, as that intense Java is a full-on smack in the mouth, an eye-widening shot of sheer colour. And in the sunlight it’s even more fantastic, the colour drenching the bodywork and accentuating all of the curves. And there are a lot of those to accentuate on a 1M.

    The colour was the inspiration behind the car’s name, by which it is best known on social media. “I wanted to name it and was talking to Ashley about it when he suggested Bruce, as in Bruce Banner, the Hulk’s alter ego. I love this concept, the dichotomy of character, and it ties in with the green colour, so it was perfect.”

    While Bruce was being constructed, it also gave Nina the opportunity to finalise her pans for the interior: “I had considered different colours like red and tan, but then I wouldn’t have been able to do the green accent stitching that I’ve got now. It really lifts the interior, as without it I was worried it would all be too dark.” B-Trim in north London handled all the interior work and the end result is fantastic, the black being the perfect partner for that vibrant green, both inside and out, and the colour-coded detailing is the perfect finishing touch. The door panels, instrument binnacle, which houses the E9x M3 dials, and steering wheel have all been wrapped in Alcantara and both the heated front seats, plucked straight from the M3, and rear seats have Alcantara accent strips. The gear selector and start button surrounds have been finished in Java green and so too have the extended aluminium gearshift paddles on the steering wheel and even the seatbelts are green, while the carbon trim echoes the carbon elements on the exterior. “I didn’t want a half-done interior,” says Nina. “I decided to go all-out and do it right first time. It was the same with the whole car. It had to be complete out-of-the-box. I didn’t want people to see a half-finished car so I made sure everything was done in one go.”

    Of course it’s the 1M body conversion that really takes centre stage here and you have to appreciate just how much work has gone in to transforming this car from humble 120d to fully-fledged performance monster. “My criteria for the build was that the car had to be executed as if BMW had built it,” Nina explains. “I can’t stand it when people do things by halves. For me it has to be done properly. The rear arches, for example, aren’t welded on; they’re complete new rear quarter sections, which is exactly the way BMW would have built the car and exactly how I wanted it to be built.” Indeed, the quality of Quarry’s work really is exceptional. There is absolutely no way that you’d be able to tell that this car had ever been anything other than a 1M. It really is perfect. The muscular styling is further enhanced by the addition of a BMW M Performance carbon bootlip spoiler and that unmistakable M3 power bulge bonnet. “I knew I had to have the power bulge bonnet,” says Nina. “It changes the whole look of the car for me, so I went for a Seibon carbon one designed specifically for the 1M. It’s fully functional, just like the M3 bonnet would be, so the offside vent is blocked off while the nearside vent connects up to the air box as a secondary cold air feed. The bonnet latches down like the standard one, but the problem is that the carbon is so much more flexible than the steel bonnet. The first time I drove it the bonnet was flexing so much at motorway speeds that I knew immediately I had to add some AeroCatches. Fitting them was tricky as the bonnet is curved and you want them to sit flush rather than sticking up, but they look perfect and really keep the bonnet down. The fitment of the carbon bonnet isn’t perfect, though, and I would love to have a metal one made but it would have to be aluminium. The standard M3 bonnet is steel and I really don’t know why BMW didn’t use a lightweight bonnet; I’ve saved quite bit of weight with the carbon bonnet so I wouldn’t want to go for a steel one, especially as the S65 V8 is just 7kg heavier than the N54 but actually sits lower down and further back in the chassis giving the car better weight distribution.


    “When it came to the wheels I did consider a few different designs but the Style 359 is my favourite BMW wheel, so that’s what I went with. I think this style of wheel looks fantastic on a modern car and really finishes it off, so the wheels are definitely staying for now,” she says. “I might change the colour as I’m not sure about the black but it does look good against the green and ties in nicely with the black accents on the body. I’ve currently got the standard size tyres, 245/35 and 265/35 Toyo R888s, but I’d like to go to a 265/295 front/rear setup as they’ll really fill the arches out and I don’t want to use spacers to achieve that.”

    If you own a V8 it’s pretty much the law that you have to fit a performance exhaust because it’s an engine that never sounds anything less than fantastic. And Nina’s 1M definitely doesn’t disappoint on the aural stimulation front. “I didn’t want to go all-out with an off-the-shelf exhaust as I’d like a custom system at some point, but I still wanted something that sounded good,” says Nina. “At the moment it’s running a Milltek 1M rear silencer, which has been designed for a turbocharged engine rather than a naturally aspirated V8, along with some M3 sections and a bit of custom pipework to connect it all together. I did have it fully de-catted at one point and I loved how obnoxiously loud it was, but it absolutely stank of fuel and after every drive the exhaust tips were black. I got fed up with it and had the cats put back in; while it’s definitely quieter the tone is nicer now and I prefer the way it sounds. I would still like a full system at some point but I’m content for the time being.” It does sound absolutely fantastic, with a boisterous cold idle that is guaranteed to slap a grin on your face, but delivers a surprisingly civilised soundtrack once it’s warmed-up. Of course, at full chat it delivers exactly the sort of spine-tingling, high-revving V8 howl that you want, overlaid with numerous pops and crackles. It’s Mozart for the motorhead.

    Even now, nine years on since its debut in the E9x M3, the S65 V8 is still an absolute masterpiece of an engine. “I love the power delivery,” grins Nina as we indulge in a long chat about V8s. “It really does pull like a train. I love the way the power delivery is so linear and the way the power just keeps on coming once you’re at the top end of the rev range. Mine is very healthy. I’ve heard that a lot of M3s don’t even make 400hp on the dyno but mine made 426hp without the cats, so it’s probably around the 420 mark now.

    As far as the gearbox is concerned, I’ve always been a manual enthusiast but I decided to drive both a manual and DCT M3 to see what the engine and gearbox combination felt like and I have to say that the manual car did nothing for me. The way the engine delivers its power means that the DCT ’box just feels so much better suited to it. I’m so glad I went for the DCT, I absolutely love the gearbox and the combination with the S65 is just perfect.”

    To you or us the car might look as complete as can be but for Nina this is only the beginning of her 1M adventure. “It was a year long journey to get to the car built,” she says, “and I finished in January of this year.

    However, for the last six months I’ve been refining and tweaking it and there’s still lots more I want to do. I’m planning to add a carbon race diffuser and front lip as well as a carbon roof, which I feel the factory 1M should have come with, like the M3. The suspension isn’t finished at the moment; it’s currently on M3 EDC shocks with Eibach springs. I like how it sits but I would like coilovers at some stage. I’m not sure what to go for, though, and I don’t want to just buy something that might not be right for it. I’m going to spend the coming months, the whole year even, learning the car, educating myself on what it wants before buying anything so I know I’ll be fitting the right parts when the time comes. I also love motorsport and while the car has started its journey like this it will evolve as time goes on, so I might well strip it and put a cage in it at some point. I’ll probably add a wing then as well. I would also really like to supercharge it at some point but at the same time I want to refine it first, make it the best it can be in its current form before I start doing any power upgrades. I do love the fact that the car will continue to evolve. That keeps me enthusiastic about it and ensures it doesn’t get stale.”


    Which brings us neatly to the question of how long Nina thinks this relationship will last, though we feel bad asking the question seeing as the car’s such a recent build. “At the moment it really does feel like it’s a forever car,” she says. “I have so much time, effort, and emotion invested in it that I can’t ever imagine selling it. I don’t even want to think about that. From the moment the car was finished people started getting in touch asking if I would sell it. I’ve had so many people asking me about buying it that I’ve lost count. Initially I was a bit offended; I couldn’t believe that people would think I’d want to sell a car I’d just finished.”

    While there might be lots more to come, there’s plenty to enjoy right now and that’s exactly what this car was built for. “This car was all about doing something purely for my own enjoyment. I didn’t want to worry about mileage, money or depreciation, I just wanted to build a car that I could go and enjoy driving. And that’s exactly what I’ve got. I do drive it based on the weather as I don’t want to take it out in the rain. So it’s a fair weather weekend toy for me and as it’s just been finished I am precious over it. I hate getting stone chips on it, though the whole front end has been covered in Suntek paint protection film so it’s not too bad. I guess it’s just inevitable. I have lots of plans, too. I want to take it to Europe. I’m currently looking for places to go and enjoy driving it,” grins Nina. That’s really what it’s all about. You don’t build a car like this to only hide it away or simply park it up at shows for other people to enjoy. You build it to enjoy driving it and there are few machines out there capable of delivering greater driving pleasure than a V8 1M.


    DATA FILE #V8 #BMW-1M / #BMW / #BMW-E82 / #BMW-1-Series-E82 / #BMW-1-Series / #BMW-1M-E82 / #BMW-E82-S65B40 / #BMW-1M-S65B40 / #S65 / #BMW-S65 / #BMW-E82-V8 / #BMW-Style-359-Competition / #BMW-1M-M-DCT / #BMW-120d-E82 /

    ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION 4.0-litre V8 #S65B40 from E92 M3, 1M #Milltek back box, part custom and part OEM M3 exhaust system, seven-speed #M-DCT gearbox from E92 M3

    CHASSIS 9x19” (front) and 10x19” (rear) #BMW-Style-359 Competition alloys with 245/35 (front) and 265/35 (rear) Toyo R888 tyres, E92 M3 brakes with Java green calipers (front and rear), E92 M3 EDC with #Eibach springs

    EXTERIOR Full OEM 1M conversion, full bare shell respray in Individual Java green metallic, gloss black trim, Seibon carbon fibre bonnet with AeroCatches, BMW M Performance carbon fibre bootlip spoiler, Blackline rear lights, Suntek paint protection film

    INTERIOR Full retrim consisting of extended black Nappa leather with green stitching and Alcantara accents, Alcantara gear selector, handbrake gaiters and door cards, steering wheel retrimmed in Alcantara with Motorsport stiching and green 12 o’clock centre stripe, extended aluminium paddles in Java green metallic with illuminated plus and minus signs, Java green start button bezel, #Java-green #DCT gear selector surround, heated E92 M3 front seats, BMW Performance carbon fibre trim, #BMW-Individual audio with #Harman-Kardon speakers

    THANKS A massive thank you to Quarry Motors, especially Ashley and Lee for agreeing to take on this project with me. Ashley is responsible for building me a spectacular, unique car that has been executed as if #BMW itself built it. Sam for initially sowing the seed and getting the ball rolling. To my biggest support, I must extend huge gratitude to Nick who has been my anchor throughout this journey. My mum who gracefully endured my countless indecisions. To all my great friends who have offered their support and advice, I thank you; Silas ‘Mr B’, Vaughan the Prawn, Richard and Sebastian with Bruce’s twin ‘the blue car’, Steven ‘Horney’, Paul ‘Mumbers’, Kos, Mason, Marsel and the rest of my big BMW family. B-Trim, Elite Car Care, Evolve Automotive, Mox3d, Mumbray Motorsport, Munich Evolution, Munich Legends, Olgun Kordal – The Car Photographer, Pukar Designs, Royal Steering Wheels, Secure My Car and SMV Repairs, Taylor Made Decals

    Java green is stunning and really suits the perfectlyexecuted 1M conversion, while the glorious #S65-V8 is the icing on the cake.

    “I love the power delivery. It really does pull like a train. I love the way it is so linear and the power just keeps on coming”
    “My criteria for the build was that the car had to be executed as if BMW had built it”
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    4.6 V8 1 SERIES Totally transformed 135i

    SLAKE THE INTERNET

    What started out life as an unassuming 135i is now a fire-breathing, 1M-kitted, 4.6 #V8-powered beast.

    It’s an inescapable fact of modern modifying that if your car becomes known online, everyone will have an opinion on it. But this is a good thing – use the love as inspiration, use the hate as fuel, and keep pushing forward… Words: Daniel Bevis. Photos: Courtney Cutchen.

    “People have very interesting reactions to my car, it sparks a lot of discussion,” says Marco Svizzero, the chap standing proudly beside this rather perky little 1 Series. “It’s an entirely modified bastard, and yet it still seems to appeal to the purists…”

    This is a pretty punchy way to set out your stall – after all, that quasi-mythical entity of ‘the purists’ is a notoriously hard bunch to please (although goodness knows why you’d want to try), so to shoo away the perennial spectre of internet hate by appealing to the very people you expect to annoy is something of a fortuitous crapshoot.

    Still, objectively – at least, objectively from a PBMW point of view – there’s nothing not to love about this car, given that it’s effectively an M3 stuffed inside a #BMW-1M-Coupé-E82 to create the ballistic #V8-1-Series that BMW didn’t think to experiment with. That’s a great way to get into our good books. “This was really my first big car build, and I never intended for the project to go so far,” Marco ponders with the measured consideration of somebody who’s been on a lengthy adventure and is struggling to come to terms with the notion of being home again. “It just snowballed, and once the project got some traction on the forums and partners like Revozport and Performance Technic got involved, it all went to another level.”

    This, of course, is the price of notoriety. Once news of your project starts to spread, and the myriad chattering keyboards of the internet start to throw a few opinions around, there really is only one way forward: go big. The ‘go home’ alternative just isn’t an option at this point; the world is watching, you’ve committed to something, you have to see it through. Your audience insists. You’ve got new fans now, they need to be appeased. And the haters? Oh, there’ll always be haters. They need to be figuratively smacked down with the iron fist of decisive action.

    “I chose a 135i as the base for my project as I really like the size of it,” Marco explains, “and I love how tunable the N54 engines are. It’s so easy to get reliable horsepower out of those motors with simple modifications.”

    You’ll have spotted, however, that the N54 straight-six is no longer in residence. That’s sort of the point of this car now. So what gives, why did Marco change his mind? “Well, as I was taking the car on track more and more, I started to run into heat issues,” he says, “so I decided to swap a V8 motor and M3 chassis into the car.”

    Okay. We’ll just let that sink in for a moment, shall we? It really is a masterstroke of lateral thinking, taking such a decision and following it through, and he’s earned the right to be charmingly self-effacing about it. Most people in this situation would have thought along the lines of ‘alright, we have some cooling issues, let’s look into revising the coolant system, maybe upgrade the radiator and intercooler and open up some more vents,’ but not Marco. Oh no. One suspects that he wanted to shoehorn an M3 inside his #BMW-135i-Coupe all along.

    “I wanted the instant throttle response of a naturally aspirated engine, as well as robust cooling and an 8600rpm redline,” he says matter-of-factly. Well, yeah, swapping in an E9x M3 under the skin is the obvious solution, isn’t it? It was foolish of us to even question it. Carry on, Marco…


    “The swap is so much more than just the motor,” he elaborates, as if trying to justify it to an irate spouse or suspicious bank manager. “It’s the M3 steering, the complete front and rear subframes including the suspension and axles, the diff, the brakes, and cool features like M Dynamic Mode.”

    And there, as the Bard might say, is the rub. If you were skimming through a forum post and looking at photos of Marco’s car, you’d be forgiven for thinking that the story here centred around a non-M 1 Series that had been converted to 1M aesthetics. And to a degree, you’d be right, as that is what has happened – what started as a stock 2008 135i bought from Craigslist soon ballooned into a broad and angry 1M clone, its strong look accentuated by the exemplary body addenda on sale from Revozport, its Raze series offering a lightweight bonnet, bootlid, carbon fibre roof (which neatly deletes the 135i’s sunroof), splitter, diffuser and GTS wing. But the body, as we know, is only half the story.


    The fun of building something like this, particularly something that’s so keenly observed online, is that there will always be ill-informed haters to bait. ‘It’s not a proper #BMW-1M ,’ they’ll say. ‘Why spend all that money on making a fake 1M when you could just buy a real one? Why pretend, why lie?’


    Marco takes all of this in his stride, with a wry smile and an eye perennially on the next phase of development. “No, it’s not a 1M, and it will never be one,” he says. “The only way to get a real one is to buy one. My car will not bear an M badge on the trunk!


    Besides, by crunching numbers for a partout and sale of my car and using those funds toward purchasing a 1M, I would have to add a lot of money on top for a very similar car.” But forget mathematics, that’s not why we build project cars. A car is just a big hole to throw money into, we don’t modify them because it’s sensible. No, the unspoken truth here is that Marco’s car isn’t a 1M because, well, it’s an M3. It just looks like a 1M…

    “When we started looking into donor M3s, they were still expensive here in the States so I actually ended up buying a car in the UK, which was dismantled and sent to me in pieces,” Marco recalls. “Once everything was sent over, Performance Technic began the build. The most difficult part was the wiring; Performance Technic has two BMW Master Techs – Matt Medeiros and Wing Phung – who tackled the project, and once the car was built we brought it to Mike Benvo of BPM Sport. Benvo cleaned up, coded and tuned the car – he is another very valuable partner in the entire project. His knowledge in coding is unmatched! These guys were extremely focused on making everything look and operate like a factory car, and I applaud them that they pulled it off.”


    As well as being OEM-quality in terms of all the buttons and gizmos, and thus eminently streetable, Marco was certainly having a lot of fun with his transformed 135i, with its 4.0-litre S65 under the bonnet and M3 underpinnings. Let’s not forget that this V8 isn’t a lazy rumbler like those of his domestic heritage; while Detroit thuds, Bavaria howls, and this engine is a proper screamer. “It really was just like a smaller, lighter E9x M3 – the naturally aspirated 1M I wanted to make all along,” Marco grins.

    Wait… “was”? “Yeah, I decided to go a bit over-the-top,” he laughs. “The S65 only weighs 15lb more than the N54 so the factory balance was still spot-on, but after a little while I swapped the motor out for a Dinan 4.6-litre stroker motor.” Well, you know what they say about how power corrupts. And absolute power corrupts absolutely. Marco seems to be pretty happy about that.


    “It really is my perfect BMW and I couldn’t be happier,” he beams. “I enjoy the car at the track, taking it to the major BMW West Coast events, rallies, and simply staring at it in my garage! It’s a car that when people see it at events, they stop and look at it – often for a long period of time. Even with the old-skool purists; I’ve received a lot of compliments from the older, more traditional BMW crowd.” This makes sense really, as it is a pure BMW at heart: a focused driver’s machine, and with nearenough undiluted factory DNA under the skin. It just happens to be suffering a smidge of body dysmorphia, that’s all.


    Again, this can be the price of notoriety. Marco’s car has always enjoyed the internet spotlight, from its early PR tie-in with Revozport to those fledgling days on the show scene before the hungry swarm of smartphone lenses, to Performance Technic’s high-profile endeavours to make the first V8-powered E82 in the USA. Then there was its triumphant Bimmerfest showcase on the Toyo stand, the countless online profiles, the numerous show awards, the online video reviews espousing its virtues as ‘the best BMW you could possibly build at any price’, the Time Attack entries, the world-first stroked S65 conversion… this car lives in a fishbowl, its every move observed and analysed. And every barbed comment that curveballs toward it gets knocked out of the park.

    We’ll leave the final thought to Performance Technic founder Joey Gaffey: “This car is a project that we all kinda fell in love with. It’s a project we thought was probably something the engineers at BMW Motorsport thought of themselves…” And that, in essence, is the thinking behind Marco’s original idea for the madcap swap, and also why the purists love this impure creation. It’s a car that #BMW should have built. Thanks to the ingenuity of these fellas, it now actually exists, albeit as a one-off. The internet demanded results, and it got ’em. What a time to be alive.

    I enjoy the car at the track, taking it to events and simply staring at it in my garage!


    DATA FILE 4.6 #V8 #BMW-135i / #BMW-135i-E82 / #BMW-E82 / #BMW-135i-V8-E82 / #BMW-135i-V8 / #BMW-135i-S65 / #BMW-135i-Dinan / #BMW-135i-Dinan-S65 / #BMW-135i-Dinan-S65-E82 / #BMW-1-Series / #BMW-1-Series-E82 / #BMW-E82-Dinan / #BMW / #CAE-Ultra / #VAC-Motorsports /

    ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION Dinan 4.6-litre stroker #S65 / #BMW-S65 / #S65B46 #V8 / #S65-Dinan / , #BPM-Sport custom tune with 8600rpm redline, #iND custom plenum, Dinan intake, Dinan pulley, VAC-Motorsports baffled sump, #Black-Forest engine mounts, #Akrapovic axle-back exhaust, custom X pipe, #Braille 21lb battery, CAE Ultra shifter, OEM M3 differential

    CHASSIS 10x18” (front) and 10.5x18” (rear) ET25 HRE 43 wheels with 265/35 (front) and 275/35 (rear) Toyo R888 tyres, M3 front and rear subframes including suspension and axles, #PSi-Öhlins Raceline coilovers, #Racing-Dynamics anti-roll bars, #Dinan-Monoball kit for front control arms, #Bimmerworld rear wishbones, Dinan adjustable toe arms, Turner MS transmission bushings, #Turner-MS aluminium subframe and diff bushings, Dinan carbon fibre strut braces, #Stoptech-Trophy-BBK with 380mm (front) and 355mm (rear) discs, OEM GT4 brake ducts

    EXTERIOR Full 1M body conversion, Revozport 1M Raze bonnet, boot and lip, carbon fibre roof, splitter with APR splitter supports, diffuser and GTS wing, Macht Schnell tow straps


    INTERIOR #BMW-Performance V1 steering wheel, gaiters and carbon fibre trim, #BMW-1M-E82 armrest delete, #Recaro-Profi-SPA seats, #Revozport #BMW-1M Raze doorcards with Alcantara inserts, P3 vent gauge, OEM 1M Anthracite headlining and pillars (for sunroof delete), #TC-Design harness bar, #Schroth six-point harnesses, #VAC hardware and floor mounts, Alumalite rear close-off panel


    THANKS Joey Gaffey, Matt Medeiros, Wing Phung and the rest of the team at #Performance-Technic , Charles Wan at Revozport, Mike Benvo at BPM Sport, Stan Chen at ToyoTires, Jason Overell at Targa Trophy, DTM Autobody and Sam at AutoTalent
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    SPACE RAIDER V8 TOURING

    Wide arched #BMW-E30 flexes its muscles. The combination of E30 Touring and V8 is hard to beat. Forget keeping it original, this #V8-powered E30 Touring is all about doing what looks good and feels right. Words: Elizabeth de Latour. Photos: Matt Woods.

    While the thought of straying from the Bavarian region when it comes to tuning BMWs gets some enthusiasts ranting about desecrating engine bays with American and Japanese engines, or destroying the sanctity of M cars with air-ride and big ICE installs, we really couldn’t give two hoots. We think that building a car that looks good and makes you happy is far more important than building one that keeps other people happy.

    That’s Paul Harding’s philosophy too because, when someone builds an E30 running Porsche wheels and a Ferrari steering wheel, you know they’re not going to care what anyone else says on the matter.

    Paul’s previous big build, a supercharged beast of an E39 M5, popped up in these pages last year and he’s a man who has been afflicted with the chronic modifying disease – he just can’t leave cars alone. It’s funny to think that when the E30 was launched and BMW designed the practical Touring for family sorts, they could never have imagined that it would become something of a darling of the modified #BMW community. Fourdoors, two-doors, soft-tops… they’re all well and good but, for some reason, when it comes to the E30 it’s arguably the Touring that has the most appeal.

    It’s a great-looking car for starters, with something so very right about the long boxy shape and it requires very little work to get it looking absolutely spectacular, a hugely beneficial E30 trait. Of course, whether or not you consider the application of Porsche wheels to result in spectacular looks is another matter entirely, but you can probably guess which way we’re leaning on the matter…

    Paul bought this car because of the V8. His friend, Phil Nobes, had an M60-powered E30 and, having sampled the combination of big, brawny bent eight and small, lightweight 3 Series, Paul fell in love and wanted some of that in his life as well. “I found this car on eBay for sale up in Dundee,” says Paul. “The swap was already completed, though it was unfinished – there was no rad, for example, and it wasn’t ready to be driven. It was a really nice car, though, with full leather, an LSD and BBS RMs, plus someone else had already done the work to get the engine in the car and running, so I bought it and trailered it down from Scotland.

    “I had a vision that the E30 was going to replace the E36 M3 drift car I had at the time and was planning to do a supercharged S62 swap. I bought the blue E39 M5 that ended up being featured in PBMW as I was going to use the engine from that for the swap. I stripped the E30 completely but then changed my mind – the shell was so solid that I had to put it back together and ended up supercharging the M5 instead, which I’ve since sold. I thought about supercharging the E30, but actually I’m going to supercharge another E39 M5 instead. I bought a Chromie E30 in the meantime as well, but ended up selling that as this Touring was just too good. That’s when I decided not to turn it into a drift car and make it into a road car instead as there are so few really clean V8 E30s about. It’s actually harder to build a full interior road car as it takes some thought and planning, rather than just pulling everything out.”

    The engine bay needed a bit of work when Paul first got his hands on the car: “I knew I didn’t want a full shaved and tucked bay, but I wanted to tidy it up and make it look good.

    I made the effort with the attention to detail as I wanted the engine to look like it belonged in there; the brake servo, for example, is now in the glovebox, and I fitted a 530i air box as I didn’t just want a generic induction kit.” The result is an exceedingly neat and tidy but functional, working engine bay rather than something that looks like it was built more for display purposes than acting as the business end of a car. Further helping to complete it, along with a fullyfunctioning rad, is the stainless tubular exhaust manifold which leads to a custom exhaust system that makes a wonderful noise, which is a requirement from anything with a V8 under the bonnet.

    The interior has been significantly changed from its original configuration. Gone are the leather seats, with a cloth bench at the back and a pair of Vabric buckets up front, which happens to be Paul’s seat company, which he runs alongside his garage, Super Duper Garage. Yes, really. It’s an awesome place that Paul has put a lot of thought and flair into. It carries with it the same passion that flows through all the cars he owns and the projects he’s got on the go, and there are quite a few of those.

    Alongside the seats there’s a digital water temp gauge by the driver’s right knee, a Z3 short-shift and then there’s the small matter of that well-worn, Ferrari-badged Momo steering wheel. It is attached to an E36 steering rack and has something of a story behind it: “I actually bought the steering wheel when I was 19 as I liked how it looked but had no idea it was actually the exact same Momo that was fitted to the Ferrari 348 from the factory. I have fitted it to countless cars that I’ve owned so naturally I had to have it in the E30. I also wanted to wind people up…” he chuckles. So, while it may have not worn a Ferrari badge originally, it’s entirely entitled to do so and is guaranteed to put a few noses out of joint with it. Finally, the load space is home to something that purists will most definitely approve of: a genuine, rare, BMW E30 boot liner, which is a nice period touch in a car with so much else going on.


    As far as looks are concerned, the car’s been dropped to within an inch of its life and you’re definitely not going to miss those custom bolt-on arch extensions. Paul had originally made them for Phil’s E30 but he couldn’t resist making them for his Touring as well. We don’t blame him, they look awesome. The body-coloured finish mean they aren’t overly aggressive, but definitely give the slimline E30 a bit more of a purposeful stance, as well as creating more room for those wheels: “I’ve had quite a few sets of wheels on the car – 16” RSs, Rondells, 17” Dares and then these Eta Beta Turbo Twists, which weren’t meant to go on this car at all. I bought them for an ’84 Porsche I had but I hadn’t fitted them when I was thinking about wheels for this. I wasn’t sure what to go for so considered putting these on – people said they wouldn’t fit, so that made me determined to get them on. They’re a 5x130 PCD, measuring in at 9x18” and 9.5x18”. They took a little work but I got them on, despite what everyone told me.”

    Now, technically, they’re not Porsche wheels, but they’re very Porsche-looking and that’s even before you add the Porsche crest centre caps. They’re good looking wheels too and they suit the E30 perfectly. 18s are a big wheel for the car to pull off, but the stepped lips and 17” matt anthracite centres make the wheels look a bit smaller, meaning they don’t dominate the car at all.

    While they may not have been destined for the E30, with that drop giving it an awesome stance, they add something extra that catches your eye on an otherwise very stealthy build.

    “I tinker with the car every now and again when I get the time, which isn’t often,” says Paul sullenly, with Super Duper Garage taking up the bulk of his time, and other projects also wanting attention. “I am really sad that I’ve not had a chance to drive it much; I’ve done just five miles in it in three years, which is bad. Those five miles were fun though and it’s a really practical car, but I’ve fallen in love with E39 M5s – I like to drive hard and I prefer their longer wheelbase as they are less snappy. In fact, I’ve got one waiting to be supercharged when I get a chance. I’m going to sell the Touring, and I always sell my cars completely done up, with all the bits and pieces fixed for someone else that I was meant to do for myself.”

    That’s something that really strikes a chord. We get our cars to their absolute best and then end up selling them rather than being able to enjoy them, with someone else getting to enjoy the fruits of our labours. Such is life. The Touring has, in fact, been sold since we completed this feature and whoever’s bought it has landed themselves an awesome machine that’s fully sorted. As for Paul, he doesn’t have time to be sad about selling the E30 as he’s got his hands full with numerous other project cars, all vying for his attention and in varying states of progress. The important thing is that he got to build and own an awesome and rather unique E30 Touring.

    decided to make it into a road car as there are so few really clean V8 E30s about.

    Single-piece Vabric buckets inside along with that Ferrari Momo steering wheel and a water temp gauge.

    DATA FILE #V8 #BMW-E30-Touring / #BMW-E30 / #BMW-E30-M60B40 / #BMW-E30-M60 / #BMW-E30-V8 / #BMW-E30-V8-M60B40

    ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION 4.0-litre V8 #M60B40 / #M60 / #BMW-M60 from E34 540i, hand-made and wrapped tubular exhaust manifolds and exhaust system with switchable #Vabric cut-out valve, E36 M3 auto radiator, #Mocal remote oil filter, electric fan with switch-in rad and override button in the car, E36 steering rack, battery relocated to boot and hidden, brake servo hidden inside the car behind the glovebox, relocated header tank, 530i air box, five-speed manual, 3.64 LSD

    CHASSIS 9x18” (front) and 9.5x18” (rear) #Eta-Beta-Turbo-Twist three-piece wheels with polished lips and matt anthracite centres, with 215/35 (front) and 225/35 (rear) tyres, #Koni inserts (front), #GAZ adjustable dampers (rear), extensive polybushing, 325i rear beam and front brakes.

    EXTERIOR Custom-made bolt-on arch extensions

    INTERIOR Vabric side mount bucket seat on adjustable rails with grey Alcantara centres, grey Alcantara headlining, Z3 short shift, hidden temp gauge, ’80s boot liner
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    03 Rich Hardesty-DeMenge’s #Air-ride LS1 V8 #BMW-E30-V8 / #BMW

    People love to have a moan about feature cars that have had non-BMW engine swaps carried out, questioning why on earth would you remove the original engine in favour of something ‘inferior’ but when it comes to the crunch you clearly can’t hate them that much, as this LS1- powered E30 takes this year’s bronze medal position. Mind you, there’s no way you couldn’t love such an incredibly well-executed car and from the dash-riding frog plushie to the small matter of 5.7-litres of American muscle nestling under the bonnet, this is an awesome car.

    We all clearly loved the fact that it’s so clean and really gives nothing away about the fact that it’s got almost 400hp to play with, courtesy of that breathed-on V8. Factor in the perfectly polished #BBS 17s and air-ride that combine to deliver the sort of stance and fitment that will have people breaking out the #goals on Instagram and you’ve got yourself one drop-dead gorgeous E30.

    02 Nick Singh Sahota’s #V8 #BMW-E30

    Little more than two fistfuls of votes separated the runner-up spot from this year’s winner and the former is occupied by Nick Sahota and his rather tasty #V8-powered E30 Chromie. Nick took home the (virtual) trophy last year with his orange, S54-powered, air-ride E30 M3 in an equally exciting battle for the top spot, and while this year’s entry from the Sahota stable was a rather more low-key affair, it clearly struck a chord with you guys out there as it quickly established itself in a strong second spot before surging after the eventual leader in the latter stages of voting.

    Another exceedingly clean E30, there is a lot to love about this car, such as the incredibly rare rear window louvres combined with the delightfully retro heckblende panel, the highly-polished 16” Schmidt splits, the immaculately executed interior with its Recaro Highbacks and Nardi steering wheel and gear knob and, of course, the 4.0-litre M60 V8 sitting snugly in the immaculate engine bay. This all adds up to a heady mix of E30 goodness that’s impossible to resist.

    01 Truls Johansen’s 580hp turbo E30 M3

    When we were compiling the shortlist for this year’s Car of the Year, we couldn’t help but speculate which car might be the potential victor this time around, but we could never have predicted this result. It’s as pleasant a surprise as we could have ever imagined. In a sea of spotlight-stealing show cars and insanely intricate big power builds, it was this turbocharged E30 that captured your imagination and you subsequently propelled it into the lead with such force we wondered if anything could possibly catch it. Please don’t think we’re taking anything away from Truls and his E30 M3, we loved it enough to put it on our June cover after all, but when the BMW-loving public is concerned, we never know what the outcome might be.

    So just what is it about this car that made it such a crowd pleaser in this year’s contest? Well, you certainly can’t go wrong with an E30 M3, and this one is arguably the very definition and embodiment of a performance BMW. With minimal styling additions, including some Evo 2 aero accoutrements and some lush Porsche seats, this car is all about power and rather than swapping in a larger engine, Truls chose to stick with the S14, carrying out some seriously extensive internal upgrades before strapping on a fat turbo and hitting 583hp, all with just four cylinders to play with. We love the end result and, clearly so do you. ‏ ‏ — with Gitter
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    RACING BULL

    Taking its inspiration from DTM, this Red Bull-liveried custom wide-body E92 M3 is no shrinking violet. Bryan McGhee has taken inspiration from the world of #DTM to create a unique and imposing E92 M3. And it’s very far from an off-the-shelf build… Words: Daniel Bevis /// Photos: André Neudert

    Red Bull is one of those brands whose name implies impeccable quality when it’s plastered along the side of a race car. Your brain happily suspends the knowledge that the product in question is a cloyingly saccharine fizzy drink, as there are so many other high-octane associations that are pushed to front-of-mind when you see that iconic dark blue canvas, liberally sprinkled with yellow suns and, er, red bulls. The livery has slipped seamlessly into the pantheon of all-time classics – not quite up there with Gulf, Martini or JPS, but on the way. Think about it: countless F1 championship wins, NASCAR , Dakar, that astounding Peugeot 207 that decimated the Pikes Peak record – Red Bull and fast cars go hand-in-hand.

    An appropriate stylistic choice for an E92 M3 then, no? Even in stock form, we know that this #V8-powered looper is a formidable beast, with its vast reserves of horsepower and general disregard for the commonly accepted laws of physics. Of course, we also know that applying race car livery to a standard car, no matter how pacey it may be, is a questionable thing to do. Look how many ST205 Celicas there are out there covered in Castrol rally stickers, and Volvo 850 estates with #BTCC colours. You’ve got to actually do something to the car first or you might look like a wally. Thankfully Bryan McGhee, owner of this M3 has nailed that element head-on; rather than relying on off the- shelf parts, his E92 offers an intriguing platter of bespoke and custom touches. And as an ex-military man, you can be sure that it’s been finished with militaristic precision…

    “Every car I’ve owned has been modified,” he explains. “This comes from my upbringing in South Central Los Angeles, and the influence of my family members who were into motorsports.” Bryan’s first car was a 1964 Chevrolet Impala, which is a pretty gangsta way to get your training wheels off, and he’s since enjoyed three Mustangs, a 1976 BMW 2002, and a mighty V10-engined Dodge Ram SRT-10 (which he sold to buy this 2010 E92). “I’ve always respected the BMW brand,” he says, “ever since I bought my 2002 back in the mid- Eighties, when I was stationed in Hawaii with the US Army. I’d say that owning a BMW is more than just owning a car – you’re buying into a piece of auto engineering history. And now that I own an M3, there’s a piece of that history that I can share with my son, who’s a motorhead just like his pop!”


    Now based in Germany, the retired sergeant major is closer to his favourite automotive brand’s spiritual home than he was in Hawaii or LA, the winding lanes of Vorbach nestled cosily in the north-eastern corner of Bavaria. Of course, there’s nothing cosy about the race-inspired intent of his E92, that’s an altogether angrier proposition, counterpointing the tranquillity of the countryside with aggressive barks and motorsport tinnitus-inducement. “I’ve always been a fan of the DTM and GT2 race series, and I wanted to build a car to replicate that spirit – a real racing car for the street,” says Bryan. “So I bought this car from Bavarian Motor Cars in Grafenwöhr, totally stock, and set about planning the transformation. Naturally the first thing I did, was give it a good wash. I’m fastidious about cleanliness, and it was raining that day…”


    Pretty much as soon as he could see his face grinning back from the gleaming paintwork, Bryan set about fulfilling his race car to-do list. The first thing to tackle – as with around 90% of the cars we feature, in fact – was the suspension; Bryan had an eye on stance, naturally, but was primarily looking for something that would be fit for purpose on those country lanes, something to complement and enhance an already impeccable chassis.

    H&R Clubsport coilovers were the order of the day; famously tested extensively at the Nürburgring, they offer totally flat cornering and supreme directional control, so are much in-keeping with the aspirations of the build. This box-ticking was quickly followed by an upgrade to the exhaust system, a Flowmaster cat-back affair helping the brawny V8 to breathe a little more freely. A BPM Performance Tune brought peak power up to a heady 475hp, which is close enough to the power output of a bona fide DTM racer to keep things entertaining.


    “At this point, I started to think about wheels,” Bryan recalls. “It had to be something that was light and strong, but also had an appropriate motorsport look.” In the end, after much deliberation, it was 360 Forged who got the call, with a set of wide rims in a 20” diameter being powdercoated in red and black to infuse a sense of malice.

    And just think for a moment about how much rubber you need to encase a wheel that’s 20 inches across and a foot wide – those Dunlop Sport Maxx tyres certainly provide a clear statement of intent. It’s at this point in the build that things start to get really interesting. Bryan wanted the car’s exterior to be unique – at once recognisable and clearly removed from the mainstream. This had to be a build that offered something different, that could hold its head up high among its peers. While the aesthetics began with a smattering of readily available parts – a Driftworks carbon fibre spoiler imported from the UK, and a carbon fibre bonnet, front bumper and bootlid from Arkym in California – it was the work he commissioned VB Customz in Grafenwöhr to carry out that really made the difference.


    We’re talking about a complete redesign of that aftermarket bumper, a unique widebody kit to rein in those vast wheels, and all manner of custom, hand-fabricated parts from spoiler supports and splitters to canards and a rear diffuser. The genius of the design is that none of it looks outlandish or out of place; aggressive – sure, unusual – certainly, but not at all jarring.


    “While all this was going on, I’d turned my attention to the interior,” Bryan recalls. “VB Customz had deleted the rear seats and trimmed everything to have more of a motorsport vibe, and there’s now an aluminium cage in there from Wiechers, and a pair of FIA-approved GP Race seats from Barcelona, with Sparco harnesses to suit.” The dedication to the race car ethos is strong in this one, and Bryan’s obsessive about the details – there are no half-measures here, only considered decisions. “The seat coding was sorted out by BPM Sport to eliminate the airbag fault code,” he says. See?

    Fastidious. Because this isn’t a laser-focused, stripped-out racer, it’s a road car that sees daily use. The fact that it has so much racer DNA is what gives it the edge.


    “The Red Bull graphics are unique as they’re all hand-made by me,” he continues, with a touch of pride. “I’m an artist, so cutting the decals was more fun than it was tedious… All-in-all, the project’s taken about two years, although cars are never really finished, are they? There are always things to do – I’m thinking about a big brake kit next.”

    The unique look of this Red Bull roadracer does seem to be going down well so far. Bryan’s first outing with the ‘finished’ product was to the Street Culture Treffen in Regensburg, and it’s fair to say that the reaction was excitable, setting social media aflame with an influx of photos and videos of the brutal M3 in action, the crowd parting like the Red Sea as he rolled out.

    “That was pretty humbling. The autobahn experience is always entertaining too, and dropping my 12-year-old off at school is priceless,” Bryan laughs. In fact it sounds like the lad’s got designs on the car for himself: “He thinks he’s going to get it when he turns 16,” says Bryan, “but mom says no!”


    Well, you can’t blame the lad for trying – particularly when pop talks about augmenting that mooted big brake kit with a supercharger. Now that would really be something to impress your classmates! For now, however, Bryan still has the keys firmly in his hand, and he’s enjoying the fact that his innovative build is deserving of those iconic colours. Much like a can of Red Bull, this E92 is light, robust, packed full of effervescent energy, and has the ability to shake up the schedule of your bowel movements if you’re not careful. If ever there’s an M3 that’s guaranteed to ramp up your friskiness levels, this is it.


    DATA FILE: #BMW-M3-DTM / #BMW-M3-E92-DTM / #BMW-E92 / BMW / #BMW-M3-E92 /

    ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION 4.0-litre #V8 #S65B40 / #S65 , #BPM-performance tune (475hp), #Flowmaster cat-back exhaust system, stock six-speed manual gearbox.

    CHASSIS 10.5x20” (front) and 12x20” (rear) 360 #Forged Maverick 5 three-piece wheels with 255/30 (front) and 305/25 (rear) Dunlop Sport Maxx tyres, #H&R Clubsport coilovers.

    EXTERIOR Custom wide-body kit by #VB-Customz , #Arkym carbon fibre bonnet, front bumper and bootlid, custom diffuser, front and side splitters, canards and DTM-style wing mounts, #Driftworks carbon fibre spoiler, custom paint and handmade #Red-Bull graphics.

    INTERIOR #Wiechers four-point aluminium roll-cage, #GP-Race seats, #Sparco five-point harnesses, rear seat delete, #GoPro Hero3.

    THANKS Thanks to my wife and son, Elisabeth and Jonah, for their input and support. Thanks to the Lord who makes everything possible. And thanks to André of Speedy Shots for taking an interest in my project.

    “I’d say that owning a #BMW is more than just owning a car – you’re buying into a piece of auto engineering history”

    Engine bay might look stock but a #BPM-Sport performance tune delivers an impressive 475hp.
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    #BMW #V8-powered E30 #Muscular 5.3-litre two-door. THE PERFECT BLEND. A sublime two-door #E30 packing a 5.3-litre V8 punch. Stuffing V8s into E30s is definitely a good thing, and if you live in the States, well donor American muscle is always close at hand. Words: Seb de Latour. Photos: Anna Taylor.
    I wanted people to know something was different about it but not easily pinpoint what the differences were.

    While the E30 M3 and other E30 rarities are considered by many to be off-limits when it comes to modding, the rest of the classic 3 Series line-up is pretty much fair game. In fact, if you’re talking about the smallerengined members of the family, then carrying out an engine swap is almost encouraged. Of course, purists would love to see a Munich motor tucked under the bonnet but I don’t discriminate when it comes to engines and as a card carrying member of the V8 fan club (with a secret soft spot for American muscle), I don’t particularly care where your V8 is from, I just care that you’ve got one. That means that I’d get on just fine with Bret Gerding as this gentleman has built himself a rather tasty, good ol’ American LS V8-powered E30.

    Bret’s automotive background saw him growing up in a household that embraced automobiles from both the US and Germany. His dad regaled the young Bret with tales of the cars of his youth, mostly the muscular sort, including Camaros and Chevelles, giving him a taste for homegrown talent, mainly Chevrolets, while an E12, E28 and E30 gave him an appreciation for Munich’s finest. “I actually cried at three years old when my parents traded their Five for a more family-friendly Isuzu Trooper when my sister was born,” he says. “I was very upset and said to my mom ‘I want the BMW!’”

    Given the car-based education he had whilst growing up, his project is hardly surprising and Bret says, “I feel like it’s the perfect marriage of my car interests”. In a feat of impressive determination and direction, this E30 was purchased with the sole intention of getting an LS V8 under the bonnet. “I always loved the classic style and lines of the E30 chassis,” he says. “And once I knew that the LS engine would fit, I set out to find a project car to build.”

    Handily, Bret has past hands-on experience of V8-based shenanigans as he and his dad built a #1994 Chevy S-10 pick-up truck, swapping out the anaemic fourcylinder for a 5.7 LS1 along with a whole host of other mods. “The S-10 was a blast,” says Bret, “and certainly fast in a straight line but I decided I wanted to build something that could tackle the turns as well as straights. I fell in love with the grunt of the LS1 and sixspeed in the truck, so I knew whatever I built would have to have the same drivetrain. After looking at a few different options, I settled on the classic E30 for its good looks and handling abilities. Ever since my dad had a #1986 #325es when I was younger, I liked the idea of having another BMW in the family, this time with more power!

    “I searched around on Craigslist and other online sites for a few weeks and came across this one in Scranton, Pennsylvania, about anhour- and-a-half from my house. The guy wanted $1000 for it, which was at the lower end of most of the cars I found. It was in pretty shoddy condition but didn’t have much rust, which was all I was really concerned with. My buddy Chris took the trip out with me and I paid the seller’s asking price. All I wanted to know was if it would make it home. When he said it would be okay I handed him the cash. He probably thought I was nuts because I didn’t really ask many questions about it! Once I got it home, the engine and trans were promptly pulled and sold to make room for the new transplant.”

    Before cracking on with that, Bret did a little housekeeping, carrying out some interior repairs and swapping out the dash before getting stuck into the meat of the project. “The car now runs a GM 5.3-litre L33 engine (LS family) and a #Tremec T56 from a #2004 #Pontiac #GTO ,” he explains. “The engine was originally from a pick-up truck and all the accessories and the intake manifold would not work for the swap, so it’s now equipped with an LS1 intake manifold and all LS1 Camaro accessories. The motor and transmission mounts were custom fabricated by me in my garage. I also modified the headers for better clearance around the steering (Sanderson units), and built the full exhaust system. The main goal was to make everything fit and operate in the E30 chassis, so not much was done in terms of engine mods aside from headers and the LS1 intake manifold. The engine also has a modified GTO front sump oil pan to clear the subframe/steering rack. I cut out a section and made a patch, which my dad welded in for me. The biggest issue was steering shaft clearance to the driver’s side header. Although it would have fitted without modification I chose to reroute the direction and bends of the pipes for more length and clearance. This was my first time building an exhaust and though I’m happy with the result I’d like to become more proficient with welding and reconstruct the whole system in stainless steel. Although I have not had it dyno tested, I’d predict the engine to now make between 325-350hp at the wheels.

    “Body-wise, the car has a full plastic bumper swap including a grafted-in lower rear valance. All of the fitting was done by me. It also has Depo smoked Euro headlights and Euro grills. I envisioned the car having a very sleek appearance, slightly modernised, without straying too far from stock. It had to look somewhat factory but also look out of the ordinary at the same time. I wanted people to look at it and know that something was different about it but not be able to easily pinpoint what the differences were. I also had a vision of keeping a sort of black and white theme, so everything is either body coloured or has black accents, along with the charcoal wheels. I did not want to have any chrome on the car. The body mods and bodywork/paint were all done by me and it took a bit longer than expected. I spent a good six months getting everything to fit correctly, priming, and blocking to make it perfect. The effort in those initial stages really shines through in the final paint job. In staying true to the stock appearance, I wanted to keep the interior looking close to stock. I was lucky enough to have the car come with a houndstooth interior that was in decent condition, requiring only minor repairs, some of which I did and some of which my mother helped out on. I swapped in a crack-free dashboard, a junkyard score. The shift knob is from an original #1969 #BMW-2002 , so it keeps the vintage/stock-feel going. If you glance inside the car, you really can’t tell that it’s running anything other than BMW components underneath.

    “In terms of suspension, it’s equipped with Ground Control coilovers, 550lb/inch at the front and 700lb/inch at the rear. I shortened the front strut assemblies one inch. Every bushing and bearing under the car was also replaced with either stock or upgraded aftermarket components. It runs brand-new stock brakes, though the fronts are soon to be swapped in favour of an Ireland Engineering big brake kit.”

    We love how standard Bret has kept his E30 looking, inside and out, and the fact that a lot of work has been carried out but you really wouldn’t notice unless you started having a particularly careful nose around. The black grilles and smoked headlights give the car a fat, dark strip up front that ties in nicely with the Apex wheels which, despite being 17s, look a lot bigger, in part thanks to that perfect drop and those spokes reaching right to the edge of the wheels. “I wanted a wheel that had a classic Euro style,” explains Bret, “but was a bit larger than stock, making room for a future brake upgrade. I also wanted something that fitted the chassis properly with a decent size tyre. The Apex Arc-8s fit the bill exactly.”

    These darker elements contrast perfectly with the paintwork which, despite looking white, is actually called Light Grey Metallic, as found on the BMW S 1000 RR motorbike. The iS additions give the car a little more visual muscle whilst still keeping things OE and that ridiculously clean interior hasn’t been messed around with, as it’s perfect in just about every way. Peering under the bonnet it’s clear that the L33 was a bit of a squeeze, taking up as it does most of the room in the engine bay, but it’s an incredibly neat install and Bret has done an amazing job. It took almost three years to get the car finished and ready for its first outing. “I took it to a show at Vargo dragway in Perkasie, Pennsylvania,” says Bret. “It’s really a vintage drag racer/muscle car show but I took the E30 anyway. Most people were very impressed with the engine swap and also commented on the paint. It was funny to listen to some people’s comments from a distance. An old couple were looking at it when the husband said to his wife something like ‘that must have been the optional engine. Mine didn’t have that’. My friends and I got a good laugh out of that one.” Aside from the aforementioned plans for a big brake kit, Bret’s not got much more planned for the E30 and it’s not going anywhere either. He says he’d like to get another E30, something with a straight-six, to have as a daily driver but he’ll keep his V8 creation. With it’s classic, subtle OE styling carrying a hint of aggression and that hulking great slice of pure Americana shoehorned into the engine bay, we can’t blame him.

    DATA FILE

    ENGINE:

    2005 #Chevrolet 5.3-litre L33 from a Silverado (the aluminium block H.0. engine), modified GTO front-sump pan, LS1 intake manifold, LS1 F-Body water pump and accessory drive, Sanderson Headers, driver’s side heavily modified to properly clear steering shaft, full custom exhaust -2.5” from headers to Y-pipe into 3” cat, 3” back to Pypes M-80 glasspack with Pypes 68-69 Chevelle Tip.

    TRANSMISSION:

    T56 six-speed gearbox from a 2004 GTO with new stock LS1 flywheel, clutch, pressure plate, throwout, stock 2.93 LSD (now swapped for 3.25 LSD).

    CHASSIS:

    8x17” (front and rear) Apex ARC8 wheels with 215/40 (front) and 235/40 (rear) Yokohama S-Drive tyre, Apex 75mm stud conversion, Ground Control coil conversion, 550lb front 700lb rear, Touring camber plates, GC RSMs, E36 steering rack, Vorshlag E30 competition steering shaft (for use w/ #E36 rack), E36 diff cover with custom dual mounts in floor, Delrin M3-style offset CABs, poly trailing arm bushings with weld-in camber adjusters (e30tech), new Lemforder control arms, Meyle anti-roll bar end links F&R, Febi tie rods, new wheel bearings all four corners, stock brakes all-round, discs and pads from Turner, rebuilt calipers, steel braided line kit from ECS tuning, massive booster delete with modified pedal ratio (6.2:1), stock ATE master cylinder.

    EXTERIOR:

    BMW Light Grey Metallic (motorcycle colour), plastic bumper conversion with shortened rear bumper, DIY Euro trim, new OEM front valance, iS lip, foglights, 88+ rear valance welded in, moulded into arch wells, Euro grilles, gloss black kidneys, smoked front turn signals, Depo smoked Euro smiley headlights, new Schwarz OEM iS spoiler, shaved side mouldings, new OEM iS skirts, DIY Shadowline trim, new Shadowline window locking strips, new PGW windscreen.

    INTERIOR:

    Pearl beige vinyl Sport seats and rear bench (now swapped for the car’s original houndstooth Sport seats and rear bench), houndstooth doorcards, 7000rpm tachometer, Garagistic ODO gears.

    THANKS:

    Thanks to any of my friends who helped me out at any time along the way during the project. Also thanks to my family for putting up with my takeover of the garage to build this car! Thanks to my dad for helping out along the way with various little projects, like any TIG or aluminum welding that had to be done.

    Thanks (Seb & Anna) for the feature!
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