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Ferrari
Ferrari owners and funs clubs and social groups

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Ferrari Dino 246 / 206 GTS / GTB
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Ferrari 458 Italia/Spider 2009-2015
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Ferrari 288 GTO
1984-1987
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1999-2004 Ferrari 360

Modena
Spider
Challenge Stradale
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2004-2011 the Ferrari 612 Scaglietti is a 2+2 coupé grand tourer manufactured by Italian automobile manufacturer Ferrari between 2004 and 2010. It was designed to replace the smaller 456; its larger s...
2004-2011 the Ferrari 612 Scaglietti is a 2+2 coupé grand tourer manufactured by Italian automobile manufacturer Ferrari between 2004 and 2010. It was designed to replace the smaller 456; its larger size makes it a true 4 seater with adequate space in the rear seats for adults.

The design, especially the large side scallops and the headlights, pays homage to the coach built 1954 Ferrari 375 MM that director Roberto Rossellini had commissioned for his wife, Ingrid Bergman.
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Ferrari 812 Superfast 2018-2020 Specifications Engine Engine compartment The car has an enlarged 6,496 cc (6.5 L; 396.4 cu in) version of the F140 V12 compared to the 6.3-litre engine used in ...
Ferrari 812 Superfast 2018-2020

Specifications
Engine

Engine compartment
The car has an enlarged 6,496 cc (6.5 L; 396.4 cu in) version of the F140 V12 compared to the 6.3-litre engine used in the F12 berlinetta. The engine produces 800 PS (789 bhp; 588 kW) at 8,500 rpm and 718 N⋅m (530 lb⋅ft) of torque at 7,000 rpm.

The 812 Superfast's engine is, as of 2018, the most powerful naturally aspirated production car engine ever made.

Despite having possessed powertrain technology expertise in overcharging (turbocharging) and hybrid disciplines, Ferrari has made clear that none of those technologies are being incorporated in the legendary FR (front-engine, rear wheel-drive), V12-engined berlinetta design -- at present and in future -- due to heritage reasons.

Transmission
The transmission for the 812 Superfast is a dual-clutch 7-speed F1 automated manual gearbox manufactured for Ferrari by Getrag, based on the gearbox used in the Ferrari 458.

Wheels
The 812 Superfast has 20-inch wheels at the front and the rear. The tyres are Pirelli P Zero with codes of 275/35 ZR 20 for the front tires and 315/35 ZR 20 for the rear. The brakes are carbon-ceramic Brembo Extreme Design disc brakes, which Ferrari claims have 5.8% improved braking performance from 100 km/h to 0 km/h as compared to the F12berlinetta. The front brakes have a diameter of 398 mm (15.7 in) and the rear brakes have a diameter of 360 mm (14 in).

Aerodynamics
Ferrari has stated that the FR (front-engine, rear wheel-drive) V12 vehicle platform -- part of the brand's heritage -- is not easy to refine and has presented various developmental challenges. As such, a combination of complicated aerodynamics technology is used to complement the 812 Superfast's chassis control system. It includes a mix of active and passive aerodynamics to improve drag coefficient values over the F12 berlinetta. The front of the car is designed to increase downforce and includes intakes for front brake cooling, as well as ducts to increase underbody air flow. The bonnet of the car also features channels to move air through to the side of the car for additional downforce. The rear diffuser of the 812 Superfast has active flaps that can open up at high speeds to further reduce drag.

Performance
Ferrari claims that the 812 Superfast has a top speed of 211 mph (340 km/h) with a 0–62 mph (0–100 km/h) acceleration time of 2.9 seconds.

The car has a power to weight ratio of 2.04 kg (4.50 lb) per horsepower(ps). This has been declared by Ferrari the 'perfect power to weight ratio'. The 812 Superfast is the first Ferrari equipped with EPS (Electronic Power Steering). It also shares the rear-wheel-steering system (Virtual Short Wheelbase 2.0) borrowed from the limited edition F12tdf. The weight distribution of the car is 47% front, 53% rear.

Design

Rear 3/4 view showing quad tail lights and body-colored diffuser
The design is inspired by the F12berlinetta, though it gets some updated styling cues like full LED headlamps, air vents on the bonnet, quad circular tail lights, and a body-colored rear diffuser. The two-box, high tail design of the car is intended to resemble that of the 365 GTB/4 Daytona, a Pininfarina design, though the car was designed at the Ferrari Styling Center.[12]The interior of the 812 Superfast takes inspiration from both the preceding F12berlinetta and the interior of the Ferrari LaFerrari, especially the shape and position of the air vents and the contours of the dashboard.

As part of the Ferrari's flagship model design, the 812 Superfast's center control stack continues to lack a central infotainment display featured in such models as GTC4Lusso and Portofino, retaining only a small temperature display for the climate control system and splitting all vehicular status information displays among the driver's multifunction instrument cluster, as well as the passenger-side touchscreen stack display above the glove compartment area.

As with certain previous models, the 812 Superfast can be ordered with specially designed, model name-tagged, multi-piece luggage set which fit into the vehicle's rear trunk effectively.

Initial market deployment and roadshow

The 812 Superfast debuted as an MY2018 model. As of 2018, the vehicle costs $358,102 in the US before options but actual delivery dates in that region are still unknown.

Shortly after the vehicle's initial unveil in early 2017, preproduction units have been sent to various parts of the world for private preview and promotion. In Asia, the 812 Superfast was unveiled in Japan as early as late May 2017 and carries a post-tax sticker price of ¥39,100,000. Deliveries were said to be scheduled later that year.

In Singapore the 812 Superfast was launched at around June (early July) 2017 with a sticker price of SG$1.42M.

In Hong Kong, the 812 Superfast was unveiled in late November 2017, making it the first new model presented under the city's new dealership, Blackbird Concessionaires (a division of Blackbird Automotive as of June 2017), in conjunction with Ferrari Hong Kong, a new, fully owned Ferrari subsidiary responsible for vehicle importation into the city. Both entitles took over from the previous dealership after complicated transitions throughout the first half of 2017, which partly contributed to delay in the new vehicle introduction in town.

The preproduction 812 Superfast used for the Hong Kong presentation, in "Rosso Settantanni" body color, was scheduled to leave town on December 10th but was delayed until the 20th, due to the need to participate in various local automotive magazines' year-end "Car of the Year" awards events. The vehicle is understood to have nabbed a few "Best of the Pick" accolades for the year 2017.

In October of 2018, noted Instagram celebrity Dan Bilzerian was seen driving one on his Instagram story.

As of December 2017 the 812 Superfast has a post-tax sticker price of HK$5.4M before options, and was scheduled to be delivered at around January 2018.

Ferrari Monza SP

Monza SP2 at Paris Motor Show 2018

At a private event held for customers and investors at the company's headquarters in Maranello, Italy in September 2018, Ferrari unvieled the first two models in its new Icona series of models. The cars called the Monza SP1 and SP2 (1 and 2 denoting the seating capacity) pay homage to the iconic open top race cars of the 1950s. The cars are designed with inspiration taken from Ferrari's historic race cars such as the 750 Monza and are developed to provide a dedicated open top driving experience. The car is based on the 812 Superfast and utilises its chassis, engine, transmission and interior components but the engine has been tuned to generate a maximum power output of 810 PS (596 kW; 799 hp).

The Monza can accelerate from 0–100 km/h (0–62 mph) in 2.9 seconds, 0–200 km/h (0–124 mph) in 7.9 seconds and can attain a maximum speed of 299 km/h (186 mph). The car uses a carbon fibre construction and features bespoke wheels, interior colour choices, small scissor doors and a full LED strip serving as the tail light of the car. The virtual windshield (present ahead of the driver only and a concept used previously in the Mercedes SLR McLaren Stirling Moss) disrupts airflow over the driver in order to maintain maximum driving comfort. Due to the use of lightweight materials, the Monza SP weighs 1,500 kg (3,306.9 lb) while the SP1 weighs a further 20 kg (44.1 lb) less due to the deletion of passenger seat.

Production of the Monza SP will be limited to 500 units with all of the units already pre-sold to selected customers and with pricing set to be unvieled at the Paris Motor Show. The cars will be delivered with a special racing suit and a helmet tailored for each customer. The new Icona series will sit above the Ferrari's flagship V8 models.
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Ferrari P-serie The Ferrari P was a series of Italian sports prototype racing cars produced by Ferrari during the 1960s and early 1970s. Although Enzo Ferrari resisted the move even with Cooper ...

Ferrari P-serie

The Ferrari P was a series of Italian sports prototype racing cars produced by Ferrari during the 1960s and early 1970s.

Although Enzo Ferrari resisted the move even with Cooper dominating F1, Ferrari began producing mid-engined racing cars in 1960 with the Ferrari Dino-V6-engine Formula Two 156, which would later be turned into the Formula One-winner of 1961.

Sports car racers followed in 1963. Although these cars shared their numerical designations (based on engine displacement) with road models, they were almost entirely dissimilar. The first Ferrari mid-engine in a road car did not arrive until the 1967 Dino, and it was 1971 before a Ferrari 12-cylinder engine was placed behind a road-going driver in the 365 GT4 BB.
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1992–1997 (456) and 1998–2003 (456M)
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Ferrari 365 1966-1971
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Ferrari 308/208 GT4 / Dino 1973 - 1980
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Ferrari 308 and 208 GTB and GTS 1975 - 1985
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Ferrari 330 1963 - 1968
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Ferrari 550 1996 - 2001 / 575M Maranello 2002 - 2006
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Ferrari 250 V12 sports car built by Ferrari from 1953 to 1964
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Ferrari-348 1989 - 1995
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Ferrari F355
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Ferrari 599 GTB Fiorano
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Ferrari 365 GT4 2+2 and 400/412 owners and specialist Club Production 1972 - 1989 years Tipo F101 Cars
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Ferrari F40
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CLASSIC ON THE CUSP Ferrari F430 As modern Ferraris embrace turbos, the normally aspirated F430 appeals / Cost new £117,000 Value now £100,000 I’m not surprised how the Ferrari F430 has been pul...
CLASSIC ON THE CUSP Ferrari F430

As modern Ferraris embrace turbos, the normally aspirated F430 appeals / Cost new £117,000 Value now £100,000

I’m not surprised how the Ferrari F430 has been pulled up by the value slipstream of almost every other prancing horse – but what has amazed me is how quickly prices have moved. Not long ago F430s were just a modern used Ferrari and now they’re suddenly neo classics. You’ll need to act fast before low-mileage coupés head to £100k and the rare Scuderia models (2000 built) move towards £250k. But with this Ferrari the rise is justified because the F430 is almost as good as a 458.


Top speed is 196mph and 60mph comes up in just under four seconds, but the epic ride and handling balance is what sets this car apart. The amalgam of switchblade-sharp steering, adjustable suspension and microsecond shifting from the brilliant F1 auto are the nearest you’ll get to the feel of an F1 car. Given the F430’s huge ability we’ve been undervaluing it for the past few years and treating it like just another contemporary secondhand supercar. Yet it drives a hundred times better than a Testarossa, 456 or – heresy of heresies – a Dino or Daytona. You’ll be buying one of the best-performing Ferraris of a generation – and one of the most reliable. Having timing chains reduces those heart-stopping fibre belt change bills and apart from cracking exhaust brackets and manifolds, ball joint and track rod end wear, it’s bombproof. Failing dash lights are common and the wheels can buckle easily but owners report few faults and most use them as daily drivers.

Don’t dismiss cars with mileage though. A 30,000-mile F430 is great value because it’s likely to be in fine fettle yet will be cheaper because most Ferrari buyers are anal about mileage. Entry level is £60k for a 2005 coupé but MP Motorsportz in Bucks has a 2006 F1 Spyder in Grigio Metallic with 28k miles and full history for £70k. But if you do want a low-miler, BHP Ltd in Aylesbury has a 2005 FI coupé in Rosso Red with 8490 miles at £70,795. Both are still sitting behind the recent value surge.

Unlike the 355, the F1 gearbox is better than the manual and definitely worth having but F1 clutches can wear quickly with town work and the carbon-fibre brakes may be wonderful but big money if you need pads and discs. Spyders are running at a premium but the lines look a little clumsy while the Berlinetta’s sweeping roof silhouette is timelessly elegant.

Prime investment potential comes with the Scuderia versions. In May Silverstone Auctions sold a Scuderia coupé with just 85km for £247,500. Such an unrepeatable opportunity seems like inspired buying now. And that £247k benchmark will drag up values of all other F430s in its wake so expect prices to creep up even further. You’ve got a brief window before everybody realises that the F430 offers infi nitely better performance and poise than almost anything from the past four decades of Maranello. The F430 is that rare thing – a fastappreciating classic Ferrari that really does deserve the hype.

‘A 30,000-mile F430 is great value because it’s likely to be in fi ne fettle but likely to be cheaper’
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Ferrari F12
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Ferrari California Club Ferrari California T Base Engine 3.9L/553-hp/557-lb-ft twin-turbo V-8 Opt Engine None Drivetrain Front engine, RWD Transmission 7-sp twin-cl auto Basic Warranty 3 yrs/...
Ferrari California Club

Ferrari California T
Base Engine
3.9L/553-hp/557-lb-ft twin-turbo V-8
Opt Engine None
Drivetrain Front engine, RWD
Transmission 7-sp twin-cl auto
Basic Warranty 3 yrs/unlimited miles
A Ferrari for the road instead of the road course.

BASE PRICE $203,000*
BODY TYPE Convertible

The California T is a great grand tourer. It lacks the knife-edge attitude we see through the rest of Ferrari’s stable, but it’s still worthy of the Prancing Horse badge. Just because it’s built for the road, not the racetrack, doesn’t mean the California T can’t paint a stupid grin across your face in the traditional Ferrari way. 553 hp is perfect for this car-enough power to get you in trouble but only when you’re asking for it.

EPA ECON CITY/HWY: 16/23 MPG 0-60 MPH: 3.6 SEC*
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Ferrari 488 GTB 2015 Club
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Ferrari Testarossa, 512TR and 512M owners and fun club. 1984-1996 cars, tuning and more.
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Ferrari 328 Club 1986-1989 Ferrari 328 GTS Long considered a ‘starter Ferrari,’ the 328 GTS is riding this marque’s value wave Thinking back to your highschool economics class, do you remember t...
Ferrari 328 Club

1986-1989 Ferrari 328 GTS Long considered a ‘starter Ferrari,’ the 328 GTS is riding this marque’s value wave

Thinking back to your highschool economics class, do you remember the theory of trickle-down economics? You know, the one where the financial benefits that a major company receives will percolate down to benefit smaller companies and, eventually, individuals? That theory has been proven factual in the rarefied world of Ferrari collecting, and the record-setting multi-milliondollar prices that vintage Ferrari road and race cars have been bringing in the past few years have been echoed in the values of even this Modenese marque’s most accessible models, like the classic 328 GTS. The 328 series was an evolution of Ferrari’s first mid-mounted V-8-powered two-seater, the 1975-1985 308 GTB/GTS.

Its lithe Pininfarina styling was enhanced with nicely integrated body-colored bumpers, while the interior was lightly redesigned for improved functionality. The newer car’s enlarged four-cam, 32-valve V8 displaced 3,185 cc and made 260 hp and 213-lb.ft. of torque, the latter of which was accessed solely through a tactile, exposedgate five-speed manual gearbox.

Following tradition, the 328 was available in both Berlinetta (solid roof) GTB and Spider (lift-off roof) GTS body styles, and also following tradition, open cars outsold their closed siblings more than five to one, with 6,068 GTS’s built to 1,344 GTB’s. These cars cost roughly $60,000 to buy new in 1986 — equivalent to about $129,000 in 2015 dollars — but for more than a decade, they traded hands in the $30,000 range. According to the record-keepers at Hagerty, the average value skewed wildly upwards over the last seven months of 2014, and since January of this year, has stabilized at a new level. Their “#4 fair” definition daily-driver GTS, which cost about $28,000 to buy in 2010, will now cost about $65,000, so this car has officially left its depreciation stage.

And if you prefer the purer looks and solid chassis of the 328 GTB, be prepared to open your wallet still further: this once-cheaper variant now commands more than the GTS to the tune of $3,000– $10,000 or greater, depending on mileage and condition. The average values in the chart on this page are far from charting the upper reaches of the 328 market.

Enrique Senior, curator of the Ferrari-focused Senega Museum Collection and senior judge on the International Advisory Council for the Preservation of the Ferrari Automobile, pondered the current market status of the 328 for this car’s buyer’s guide in the February 2015 issue of Hemmings Sports & Exotic Car; “There are major differences in condition and price between a nice driver that you’re keeping going and a platinum award winner in the top five percent.

“You might spend $55,000-$65,000 on a driver, $85,000-$95,000 on a good, original car. 328s at the top level are traded internally between our members, and they’ll need a $100,000-$150,000 budget, including consulting fees, to buy an original 328 with less than 10,000 miles, complete with books and tools, in perfect condition,” he explains. “It seems crazy to mention these figures now, but they will soon seem cheap for a 328.”

Value Trend
1986 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015
$63.3K $45K $35K $35K $31K $65K
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