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Servicing 4,000 miles 8,000 miles 18,000 miles Routine Replacements: Time hours Labour Spares TOTAL Time Allowed (hours) 4 7 2-25 Brake pads-front (2 wheels) 0-75 £2.48 £8.61 £11.09 Cost at £3.30 per hour £13.2 £23.1 £7.43 Brake pads- rear (2 wheels) 0-75 £2.48 £7.32 £9.80 Engine oil £2.72 £2.72 — Exhaust system     Oil Filter _ £2.27 _ complete (one side) 30 £9.90 £37.25 £47.15 Sparking Plugs  — — £5.84 Dampers—front (pair) 10 £3.30 £10.24 £13.54 Total Cost: £15.92 £28.09 £13.27 Dampers —rear (pair) 1-5 £4.95 £10.24 £15.19         Replace half shaft 40 £13.20 £16.32 £29.52         Replace alternator (exchange) 1-1 £3.63 £62.0 £65.63         Replace starter (exchange) 1-5 £4.95 £59.10 £64.05   Jensen Interceptor MkIII Convertible 7.2 road test ...
  1.   votren911
  2.   Thursday, September 18 2014
Servicing and accessibility The jack is easy to use without getting one’s hands dirty, but it is both slow and heavy in operation. Although it should be possible to get at the nut in the floor of the boot to lower the spare wheel tray without taking out any luggage, the wheel itself is heavy and difficult to remove from the tray without kneeling on the ground. Despite the added complexity of front-wheel drive the long bonnet provides ample room for the engine and all the servicing points are easy to get at. Servicing is required every 4,000 miles and is surprisingly modest in its demands for so complex a vehicle, the main jobs being a change of engine oil, a top-up for front and rear axles plus greasing of three nipples. ...
  1.   votren911
  2.   Wednesday, September 17 2014
Fittings and furniture A clear and reasonably accurate speedometer with a matching rev-counter are mounted straight in front of the driver and are easily visible through the spokes of the steering wheel, but less fortunate in its location is the combined oil pressure and water temperature gauge which nestles low between them, angled downwards, and which cannot easily be read on the move. The ammeter and fuel gauge are mounted in the centre of the facia at the top of the switch console and are more readily seen. For map reading there is a rather feeble light incorporated in the dipping mirror, but this is backed up by two further, and much brighter, individually controlled lights on either side of the roof. Neatly styled into these is a pair of grabhandles for the rear passengers, while at the front there are armrests on the doors. Also on the doors are small pull-out ashtrays, matching a similar pair in the rear quarters — naturally there is a cigar lighter on the central console. Both front windows are electrically operated, and the standard equipment includes reversing lights and a very good radio installation with two speakers. The arrangements for the stowage of odds and ends are a little less satisfactory. The under-facia parcel shelves are small and shallow, as is the lockable glove box (which can foul your elbow when changing gear) on the transmission tunnel. The map pockets on the doors and the backs of the front seats are some compensation for this lack of space, and the large rear parcel shelf is fine until you remember that everything rolls off as it rises with the tailgate. Accommodation for heavy luggage is much better: the Jensen’s carpeted boot accepted 8.1cu.ft. of our test boxes — and you can get in more by temporarily removing the boot cover — and on one journey swallowed up our test kit, a lot of photographic gear as well as some rough weather clothing with sundry pairs of Wellington boots. ...
  1.   votren911
  2.   Wednesday, September 17 2014
Comfort and controls On British roads the ride was firm and well damped, with small amplitude movements and a trace of pitch. When subjected to the far bumpier French “routes de communication importante” the Jensen lived up to both its GT and luxury images by allowing us to drive at around 100mph without excessive movement of the car or any trace of bump-steering. It was only when driving at such speeds on roads of this kind that we noticed an increase in the amount of movement and some float on undulations when the Selectaride was turned to its softest setting; under all other conditions we could detect little difference. The large, high-backed seats with reclining backrests — slotted to receive optional headrests — provided reasonable lateral support but the shape of the cushion tended to make the occupant slide forward, promoting back-ache and fatigue on long journeys. A steering wheel adjustable for reach allowed anyone to adopt a straight-armed driving position if he wished, although a little more fore-and-aft adjustment would have been appreciated by the taller members of our staff, and the lever controlling the reclining mechanism is almost trapped between the seat and the door so that it is very difficult to use on the move. At the rear the legroom is barely adequate for small children, making it difficult to take advantage of the depth of the shaped rear seats, unless the front seats are pushed well forward. Major controls such as the steering wheel and gear-selector are well located in relation to each other, but the driver’s footwell is rather narrow — the brake pedal is of normal, “non-automatic” width — and some of our test staff complained that the left foot resting place (near the footrest-sized dipswitch) was uncomfortable. The more important minor controls, such as the horn button in the centre of the wheel, the indicator/flasher stalk and the rotary/push wiper/washer control which occupies a prominent position on the left of the central console, are similarly easy to find when required. For all other controls, however, it is to be hoped that the intellectual attainments of the typical Jensen FF owner are on a par with his income, for there are almost as many switches, levers and knobs sticking out of the panel beside the driver as quills on a porcupine. Part of the trouble arises from the complexity of the comprehensive heating and ventilating system, which has a lever controlling water volume mounted at the bottom of the console, flanked by a similar lever controlling air distribution, while air volume is governed by a quadrant control near the steering wheel. The windscreen demisting vents can further separately be controlled by knurled nuts and there are three eyeball type face-level vents on the facia. Then there is a two-speed fan for the heater and another to boost the flow from the fresh-air vents, and a third switch for the electrically heated backlight. Perhaps we did not get enough practice to master so many controls for we found that on the move continual adjustment was needed to maintain the interior at an even temperature. Our test car suffered slightly from an imperfectly sealed front quarter light which raised the otherwise low level of wind noise. Engine noise was very slight, but the cross-ply tyres made a muffled roar on coarse surfaces (which a Peugeot-owning passenger noticed immediately) and subdued thumps when the wheels contacted larger irregularities. The long, wide bonnet made placing of the car in confined spaces a very simple business; visibility is excellent and the goldfish-bowl rear window splendid for rearward vision. Equally good was the tremendous blaze of light on main beam produced by the four Lucas quartz-iodine headlamps. ...
  1.   votren911
  2.   Wednesday, September 17 2014
Handling and brakes If further evidence be needed to explode the theory that power steering systems are incapable of providing “feel” it is supplied by the Adwest rack-and-pinion system fitted to the Jensen FF series 1 (optional on the Jensen  Interceptor). Few drivers — unless they had considered the problem of coping with fat tyres and a front axle weight of nearly a ton — would detect power assistance were it not for the occasional slight twitching’s and hissings that sometimes betray its presence in the car park. Splendidly light for parking — yet without that almost total lack of resistance at the wheel rim characteristic of many power steering systems — there is always enough feel to let the driver know what is happening to the front wheels. When driving along iced-up ruts in a snow-covered Welsh mountain road, for example, the forces exerted by the ruts on the front wheels were always faithfully reflected at the steering wheel allowing the appropriate rapid corrections to be made; with a normal “feel-less” system almost the only indication of “rut-steering” would have been an actual change in the direction of the car. On bumpy roads there was also a certain amount of kickback. Despite a ratio which requires a little over 3 1/2 turns from lock to lock the steering seldom feels low-geared. More than anything it was this twirlability — coupled with the excellent feel — that inspired confidence in our drivers to chuck all 36 cwt. of the Jensen around as if it were an Imp. And the addition of front-wheel drive has made no difference to the (rather poor) turning circle. What the Jensen does on a comer is complex but consistent and always in the driver’s favour. Consider first the behaviour in the dry when cornering under power. The first thing most drivers noticed was the ability to accelerate on full throttle through a right angle from T-junctions and the like with no more than a faint grumble from the tyres. Such decorum is in marked contrast to the nasty manners of most other very powerful cars whose antics during such a maneouvre range from a tantrum of tyre-smoking wheel-lift to instant rotation about a polar axis. What happens at higher speeds up to 60-70mph depends very much on how much surplus power is used, for the 37:63 front/rear torque distribution ensures that the FF to some extent handles like a conventional rear-wheel drive car, so that pressing the accelerator tends to point the car into a corner, requiring a little lock to be unwound. It is, however, genuine oversteer rather than tail-slide, even at low speeds with a lot of right boot: the kind of opposite lock circumnavigation of a steering pad with the car lined up almost radially that is described in our test of the Interceptor is quite alien to the fastidious nature of the FF. At higher speeds the behaviour is more like that of a front-wheel drive car and there is mild understeer, until eventually the whole car slides bodily sideways for a brief moment before scrubbing off speed and regaining its grip. Actually understeer is not the proper term to use here, since it refers to a situation in which the front of the car tends to run wide with respect to the rear; all four of the Jensen’s wheels tend to run wide simultaneously, a phenomenon which one member of our test staff suggested might be called “crab-steer”. Lifting off while cornering hard creates a mild degree of front-end tuck-in which the hardest likely combination of simultaneous braking and cornering does little to aggravate into anything worse than an easily controllable change of line. It is only when the driver gets to the stage of adding 0.5g braking to 0.5g cornering — in the wet — that the laws of nature can no longer be defied and the tail of the car swings out — but still in a readily controllable way. Perversely, our period of tenure coincided with what must surely be a Briti ...
  1.   votren911
  2.   Wednesday, September 17 2014
Transmission Just as satisfying as the effortless performance was the character of the Chrysler Torqueflite automatic transmission which usually changed gear smoothly and neatly. So long as kickdown was selected below about 50mph, the attendant downward shift was performed with equal neatness, but above that speed the change became rather violent and jerky. Manual downchanges on the over-run were inclined to be rather sudden, too. Although 37 and 70mph may seem rather low change-up speeds for a car with a maximum of 130mph, not much improvement in acceleration is to be gained by resorting to manual control which is mainly needed for holding a gear on roundabouts, twisty roads etc. On the Jensen this is a simple matter of selecting 1 or 2 as marked on the selector quadrant, although the lever was initially stiff until adjustment was carried out. The Ferguson four-wheel drive system has already been described at length in Motor and needs no more than a brief re-cap here. Behind the conventional automatic gearbox is the Ferguson control differential which distributes the drive to a normal live rear axle via a short prop-shaft, and to the front wheels through a chain drive and another prop-shaft which runs forward beside the engine. The control differential apportions 63% of the torque to the rear wheels; 37% to the front, but more important prevents the front wheels from overrunning the rears by more than 16.5% and the rears from overrunning the fronts by more than 5.5%. The Dunlop-Maxaret brake sensor is driven off the differential and transmits electrical signals to a solenoid which in turn controls the action of the powerful vacuum servo. ...
  1.   votren911
  2.   Wednesday, September 17 2014
Performance With all those extra drive-shafts, differentials and gears to turn — quite apart from the extra 3 cwt they weigh — one might expect both the performance and the economy of the Jensen FF seies 1 to be significantly worse than of the Interceptor, but in fact the difference is slight. Thus although the 130.5mph top speed is lower than the 138.5mph attained by our Interceptor, we have reason to believe that the earlier car had an unusually good engine with a bit more power at the top end. Certainly the standing start acceleration times of the two cars are virtually identical until 100mph when the FF begins to fall a little behind. Hence with the ability to get from a standstill to 60mph in 8.1s. (7.7s with manual selection of the gears) the Jensen FF S1 is one of the very quickest rare old cars available today. At 100mph the engine is humming unobtrusively at less than 4000rpm making the Jensen one of the most restful cars we have ever driven. Above 4000-4200rpm — the speed at which the automatic transmission changes up — engine noise becomes a little more noticeable and the car is just beginning to work hard at 110mph but still in a very calm relaxed way with a noise level that allows the radio to be heard in comfort. For acceleration there is little point in using much more than 4,000 rpm, since the peak of the power curve is attained at 4600rpm and the engine runs abruptly out of urge at its 5,100 rpm red-line limit, perhaps because the critical “pump up” speed of the hydraulic tappets is being approached. The back seats are deep and comfortable with a central armrest and ashtrays on each side. Rear-seat legroom is limited unless the front seats are pushed well forward. Almost the only evidence of increased weight and rolling resistance is in the poor constant speed fuel consumption at the lower end of the range — 30 and 40mph. But as the increase in consumption with increased speed is from then on very gradual, and as the maximum speed is slightly lower than the Interceptor’s, the touring consumption works out more or less the same at 14.8mpg. Similarly our 11.5mpg overall fuel consumption was actually a trifle better than for the Interceptor — not that petrol economy, if you can call it this, will be of too much concern to an FF buyer. A 10:1 compression ratio means, of course, that only the best fuels will do: although the car ran quite happily on French 98 octane super, certain 99 octane petrols bought in England produced quite marked pinking. ...
  1.   votren911
  2.   Wednesday, September 17 2014
Motor road test Jensen FF. Performance with safety. Four-wheel drive does not significantly reduce performance, superb power steering, best handling car of its size and power we have tested.   PRICE (1968): £4,707 15s plus £1,309 15s 10d purchase tax equals £6,017 10s 10d. Fog and spot lamps extra. For the second time in a matter of weeks Motor has tested one of the first production examples of a new car which embodies outstanding advances in automotive technology. But almost the only features common to the two cars are superb power steering and magnificent handling, for while the technical interest of the NSU RO80 derives mainly from its Wankel engine, the Jensen FF is distinguished by its Ferguson Formula four-wheel-drive and anti-lock braking system. More significantly, while a substantial German car maker took up the Wankel invention and forcefully pushed through its development, the British motor industry seems to have turned its back on the equally important ideas of the FF system, leaving their evolution to the relatively slender resources (financially speaking) of Harry Ferguson Research Ltd., and their realization in a production form to the courage of a tiny lone-wolf firm, Jensen of West Bromwich. As a result the British buyer has to pay heavily for his advanced engineering, for the extra cost of the Ferguson system is £1,499 — the difference in price between the more complex car and the ordinary Interceptor. What does he get for this sum of money — itself more than most people are prepared to pay for a complete car? In its Interceptor form the Jensen is already an outstanding high-performance car with excellent roadholding; the combined effect of the four-wheel drive and first-class power steering with excellent “feel” is to make it quite simply the best handling car of its size and power we have tested, with tremendous cornering power, wet or dry. Above all it is wieldy and can be thrown about as if it were a car of half its size and weight. To make a large car weighing 36 cwt. behave in this way is a very considerable feat. And of course the system has other advantages: no FF owner is likely to get stuck in a muddy field; nor should he ever need such aids to adhesion as chains or studded tyres. Our approval of the Dunlop-Maxaret anti-locking system is a little more cautious. It does its job of preventing the wheels from locking under wet and slippery conditions, but the rate of release and re-application seems to us to be a little slower than we remember it to have been on the Ferguson R5 prototype and the whole car bounces up and down as the Maxaret does its work. Our test staff found this bouncing action rather disconcerting at first, but having grown to accept it, we feel that the system could be a life-saver, especially in a really high-speed emergency, as it is possible to brake, steer and corner at the same time in a way which would be impossible with an ordinary car. The front seats have an adequate range of fore-and-aft adjustment but are not very comfortable. The lever at the bottom of the photograph locks and releases the reclining backrest, but is difficult to reach with the door shut. The knurled knob above it controls the tension of the spring which forces the backrest forward when released. ...
  1.   votren911
  2.   Wednesday, September 17 2014
Perfect auto - Jensen Interceptor What auto writers say about the Excerpts says S.F. Sunday Examiner, Chronicle — Oct. 25, 1970 — by Dick Nolan The Perfect Auto — I suppose that a motor car does make some kind of statement all out its owner, however superficial. The Jensen suggests that the guy is well heeled, imaginative, a touch adventurous but not rash, tasteful, unconventional, young where it counts." Devon Life — June, 1970 - by John Whit ell "Once in a lifetime a motor correspondent finds a car that will make him sell his house, auction his wife and hock his children just so he could own one. I have just discovered such an ear and after driving it nothing is sacred any longer, this is the effect the Jensen had on me, it was love at first sight." The Sunday Express — April '20. 1969 — by Robert Glenton "It is a lazy, docile purr of a car. Its great Chrysler engine drowses until you want it, its very good power steering and its automatic transmission make it one of the easiest laziest cars in traffic, and yet one gap one touch of the throttle, and you are two traffic blocks further along, as politely angelic as an unjustly accused choirboy. The Jensen looks menacing, for it has splendidly powerful lines.” Nottingham Evening Post News — April 2, 1969 — by Jerry Ames “Cruising in silence at 100 m.p.h. with plenty of power in hand, is one of the features that makes the Jensen Interceptor such a delightful car to take along fast. Continental roads." — by Sterling Moss.   "For all that, the Jensen Interceptor is a magnificent car. It is extraordinarily responsive to the power of its engine, yet there seems little doubt that the driver is always in command." ...
  1.   Martin
  2.   Tuesday, September 09 2014
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