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  •   Peter Tomalin reacted to this post about 1 year ago
    Demand grows for #Aston-Martin-V8 projects #1973-Aston-Martin-V8 / #1973 / #Aston-Martin


    One of the surest conirmations of a classic’s growing popularity is when people start paying what looks like silly money for project cars. With Astons it very much prefaced the epic rise of early DB values some years ago. Now it appears to be happening with the V8s. Two results on successive days recently put the seal on it.

    First we saw a 1973 V8 offered at South West Vehicle Auctions that had been buried under storage boxes in a garage for 20 years. Said to be a runner – probably – it will obviously require plenty of attention even if the new owner is only aiming for preservation-class standards. Estimated (rather pessimistically) at £22,000-£26,000 it was deemed good enough to pay a ‘Good’ £48,224 for.

    Similar happened at ACA the next day with a #Aston-Martin-DBS #V8 that had been recently repatriated from Japan and was in need of a complete going-over. Offered at no reserve it topped out at just over £66,000.
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  • CAR #Aston-Martin-V8-Volante 7 LITRE / #Aston-Martin-V8-Volante-7.0 / #Aston-Martin-V8 / #Aston-Martin / upgraded motor to 7003cc, from 5340cc
    Year of manufacture #1979
    Recorded mileage 67,080
    Asking price £195,500
    Vendor Aston Sales Kensington; tel: 020 7985 0111; www.astonkensington.com

    WHEN IT WAS NEW
    Price £33,864
    Max power 310bhp
    Max torque 320lb ft
    0-60mph 6.7 secs
    Top speed 140mph
    Mpg 11.8

    This PoW-fronted Volante jumped out at us because the price didn’t look greedy, especially when you take the expensively upgraded motor (to 7003cc, from 5340) and appropriate registration into account. It turns out to have been a former C&SC cover star, too, from May 2011.

    The V8 was rebuilt by RS Williams from the original block at 56,000 miles in 2002, roughly contemporary with when the bodywork was restored with new sills plus outriggers and the colour changed from the factory gold to Balmoral Green. It also had a new rear bumper at about that time, and some of the bills around 2007 are from Zurich.

    The paint is still good overall, with a few minor stone chips around the nose and one small scratch on top of the right front that would probably polish out. There are tiny bubbles under the quarterlights, which is normal. The alloys are unscuffed, shod with well-treaded Turbosteels, ditto for the spare, which retains its remote inflation tube. The exhaust appears to be fairly fresh from the downpipes back and the rear dampers look recent.

    Inside, the leather is the original with some character, the carpets look new and the veneers are mint bar one small crack in the centre console. It starts instantly, with a sharper bark than standard and you feel the more urgent acceleration from the big motor. The steering has a nice weight, and the gearchanges are smooth with a responsive kickdown.


    The brakes are very much of their era, but once past the initial shove they get the job done. Oil pressure is at least 60psi, coolant about 90ºC and the oil-temperature needle barely moves in London traffic. Everything works, including the hood, windows and even the aircon – eventually. The Aston will be sold with a handbook, spare keys, extensive history file detailing the works done and including the original guarantee sheet – plus the registration number, the value of which will be in five figures. It will come with a new ticket, after a trip through ASK’s workshops.

    SUMMARY

    EXTERIOR Excellent overall, with just a few small stone chips
    INTERIOR Original leather; all very good
    MECHANICALS Strong, sorted and 7 litres

    VALUE 5

    For Old school; plenty of prod
    Against Like owning the Forth rail bridge; you get to one end and…

    SHOULD I BUY IT?

    If you’re going to have one of these, this is probably the model to go for; it’s more discreet than Vantage and X-pack cars that cost much more.
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  •   Alastair Clements reacted to this post about 1 year ago
    CAR: #Aston-Martin-V8-Vantage / #1984 / #1984-Aston-Martin-V8-Vantage / #Aston-Martin-V8 / #Aston-Martin / #Aston-Martin-Vantage
    Name Andrew Forret
    Age 67
    Occupation Engineer
    From Leeds
    Other cars BMW 325i E30, Land Rover Defender 110 300TDi
    Daily driver Any of the above
    Best trip Anything in the Aston Martin


    RACKING UP THE MILES IN A BIG GT

    When did it all begin? The seed was sown in the ’70s when I saw a picture of a Mandarin Yellow Aston V8 Vantage on the wall of a filling station. Many years later, during a chance conversation with the late Chris Meek I mentioned what my dream car was, but that I couldn’t afford one. Chris replied: “If you really want one, you’ll get one.”

    Scroll forward a few years and I came across an ad for two Astons at an auction house specialising in bankrupt stock. Enquiries were made, and I was surprised to find that purchase was a possibility. Further research took me to Aston Martin, then the Club and finally a local specialist who knew the cars.

    I placed a bid, but was unsuccessful. I later met some Aston Martin Owners’ Club members at a show at Harewood House and was told that it was possible for non-owners to join. I became a member in 2000, my aim being to find out about the practicalities of ownership and establish which would be the most suitable model to use every day. I also took the opportunity to call in at as many Aston specialists as possible, and they were all very helpful.

    Eventually, I decided that the car for me was a V8 – the later Oscar India if possible, manual and, if I was lucky, a Vantage. In late 2002, I placed an advert in the Cars wanted section of AM News and received 14 responses. Over the next three months I looked at almost every one, and settled on an ’1984 Vantage with 32,700 miles on the clock – actually the second car I’d looked at.

    In April 1981, Motor’s headline read ‘Aston Martin Vantage – the world’s fastest production car?’ The test figures quoted were 0-60 in 5.2 secs and a top speed of 168mph – not bad for a car weighing in at 1783kg, or 35.1cwt in old money. So has my dream been fulfilled?


    Absolutely! I have used it whenever possible, and covered an additional 96,000 miles. Other than driving it to visit clients around the UK, I have been on tours to Interlaken in Switzerland, Lake Garda in Italy, Granada and the Atlantic coast of Spain, Sweden and Norway, the Le Mans Classic (six times) and Monaco (taking in the Millau bridge and Route Napoleon). My other passion is track days (in the Aston), with visits to Goodwood, Mallory Park, Kinnekulle in Sweden, Silverstone, Oulton Park, Guadix in Spain and Blyton Park.


    The AMOC organises numerous events around the country, including a spring and autumn concours, and earlier this year the car was awarded first place in the Pride of Ownership Heritage Class at the new factory in St Athan, south Wales (Your events, July).

    Has it been an expensive (albeit enjoyable) experience? As with many things, it depends how you look at it. The purchase price was no more than a new mid-range Mercedes. Had I purchased such a car and replaced it every three years, the depreciation would probably have been equivalent to that of the underbody restoration and engine rebuild that the Aston has needed.


    Service intervals are 5000 miles but most of this is oil, greasing and filters, etc, which you can do yourself. At 15mpg – better if you take it steady – fuel consumption is what you would expect from a 5340cc V8.

    Residual values are another matter, with those of older Astons going through the roof – nice but not relevant if you have no intention of selling. More modern cars (DB7, Vantage and DB9) are now much more affordable and can provide as much enjoyment. My advice is to join the AMOC, buy a car to drive, and always pay a specialist to inspect it first.

    Forret gets the Vantage airborne during a spirited run at the Cholmondeley Pageant of Power in 2013.

    Gunning the V8 at #Blyton-Park with guidance from ex-BTCC ace Mark Hales. Luxurious interior ideal for long journeys. Aston’s 5340cc #V8 provides stonking pace. Alongside Jet Provost at #AMOC concours. Taking in Spain’s Atlantic coast in 2015.
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