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    THE MARKETPLACE

    / #Mercedes-Benz-600-W100 / #Mercedes-Benz-W100 / #Mercedes-Benz-600-Pullman / #Mercedes-Benz-600-Pullman-W100

    Buckley’s market matters

    I nearly struck a deal with a man in Birmingham on two #Mercedes-Benz 600s a couple of months back, both of which were right-hooker 1960s examples with royal or presidential connections. The first disappointment on arrival was to find out that they were limousines rather than long-wheel-base #Pullmans ; the short-wheel-base cars are relatively plentiful and not huge money for what they are.

    The next downer was that the car said to have 1000 miles on it was the shed of the two, and way beyond any economical repair. But then again, what 600 is economically repairable? The story was that the blue car (the aformentioned shed) had given its first owner problems early on, been parked up and left to deteriorate, having been quickly replaced by a second 600.

    I was surprised to see that the other, much more together-looking brown car fired up happily, although it was not left running long enough to see if any life went back into the suspension airbags and the hydraulics. I couldn’t readily see any chassis plates on the cars but I could see lots and lots and lots of money to spend just to make the ‘good’ one of the pair a driving prospect.

    I’m not quite sure why, but I suggested a swap with my Mercedes-Benz 220SEW111 Coupé – probably because I knew the man wouldn’t bite. Luckily for me he didn’t. I suppose, deep down, I do sort of want a 600 – if only as a box-ticking exercise.

    I suspect the cars are still sitting where they were, although I have a feeling they will end up as donor vehicles. Prices and availability of 600 parts being what they are, if you have the time, the patience and the skill, it is probably the only way you would ever make commercial sense of these dinosaurs.

    I also went to Southend in Essex recently and was amazed by the number of old cars floating around. Within the space of 20 minutes’ driving I saw a fastback Sunbeam Rapier, a Vanden Plas Princess 4 Litre R, an HB Vauxhall Viva and a Hillman Minx. And just when I thought it was all over, an old boy trundled past in an immaculate L-registered Triumph Toledo.

    The prospective purchase of two Mercedes 600s (luckily) fell flat recently, thus leaving Buckley’s itch yet to be scratched.
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    Martin Buckley
    Martin Buckley joined the group Mercedes-Benz 600 W100
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    FIAT 130 COUPÉ

    / #Fiat-130-Coupe / #Fiat-130 / #Fiat /
    RUN BY Martin Buckley
    OWNED SINCE 2009
    PREVIOUS REPORT Nov 2018

    I want to make #2019 the year in which I get everything – and I mean everything – sorted on the 130. It is 90% there but, as usual, the final 10% is proving the hardest. The problem with getting a car up and together piecemeal and ‘on the hoof’, as it were, is that as soon as you get one item right it tends to highlight all the other issues. What seemed acceptable last year now irritates the hell out of you.

    Top of my list for quite a while has been the suspension; every time I drive the Coupé, my overriding impression is that it wallows like a pig if driven with anything even approaching enthusiasm. Standards have moved a long way in 40 years, but these cars were fairly highly rated for their cornering capability. Yes, they rolled – everything did in the ’70s – but not quite as dramatically as this.

    It can only be dampers, really, but the odd thing is that when you bounce the car on each corner it feels rock-hard. I have mentioned this to Mark Devaney at Dino 24 Hundred several times, but we have now decided to galvanise ourselves. Mark has found a set of donor 130 Coupé struts and sent them off to Gaz Shocks in Essex which, as the name implies, builds custom gas shock absorbers. These take about four weeks to do (they are busy), so hopefully by the time you read this I’ll have a 130 that doesn’t want to scrape its doorhandles on the floor.

    Depending on how successful this proves to be, Mark is talking in terms of a thicker front anti-roll bar as well. The dampers will be adjustable, so hopefully we’ll be able to tweak them to best advantage without losing the good ride quality.

    The brakes are pretty decent, other than the fact that the vacuum in the servo disappears overnight so you have a solid pedal for the first minute or so; maybe it’s time to look at the booster. I still like the idea of finding an alternative disc and/or caliper to future-proof the car a little, because certain parts are getting rare and pricey. The way forward here may lie in the realm of the Stratos replica, because the genuine cars used a variety of 130 bits, possibly including the hubs and wheel bearings.

    I spent some time at the end of last year cleaning the engine bay with fairly good results. It was just a matter of some laborious elbow grease in every corner, making good use of the Polti steam-cleaner and the Gunk, then going over it again until you either get bored or realise you can’t get it looking any better unless you want to take the engine out – which, to be honest, is probably the only real way of doing the job properly. But still, it looks better than it did.
    As for the rest of the car, visually the only things I find irksome are the tired and faded window channels. I now have some samples of possible replacements from trim specialist Woollies to look at.

    Ace mechanic Gus Meyer sorted the fan-switch issue that cropped up on the Le Mans Classic trip, but we still need to look at the wipers (there’s only one speed when there should be two), the driver’s-side door lock (it won’t unlock) and fit the correct Marelli air horns: the Fiat’s American Edelweiss ones really should be on my #Oldsmobile-Toronado .

    It seems the 130 is going up in the world at last, because I’ve been contacted by two separate parties looking for parts for ground-up rebuilds; one the subject of a car restoration programme on the TV. This indicates that they are either climbing in value (they are, but only a bit and it’s never been about that with these cars for me) or, with the youngest now more than 40 years old, there just aren’t enough really nice ones to go around.

    This is true in the case of the right-hookers, but I seem to get offered left-hand-drive Coupés all of the time. Most are described as ‘rust-free but in need of recommissioning’ – an estate agent-style euphemism for ‘knackered’.

    THANKS TO
    Mark Devaney, Dino 24 Hundred: www.dinouk.com
    Gus Meyer

    Plenty of elbow grease has got the 130’s engine bay looking a whole lot more presentable.
    The Coupé looks good, but now Buckley wants to get it driving just as well; once rebuilt, the replacement dampers (right) should help.
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    CAR #Range-Rover / #Land-Rover / #Land-Rover-Range-Rover /

    RUN BY Martin Buckley
    OWNED SINCE March 2012
    PREVIOUS REPORT June 2018

    I decided to take pal Mark Cosovich up on his offer to detail the Range Rover, concentrating mainly on the engine bay. He doesn’t often stray far from Mercedes but he was keen to get his son Alex involved because he is saving up for a car, and thus able to do me one of his famous ‘super trade’ deals.

    RAY 606W cruised beautifully down the M4 to Swansea and Cosovich’s new W123 World workshop. An early G-Wagen was on the ramp; it’s hard to believe they still make these – it was an ugly pig of a thing, even in the ’70s. Not even Mark is a fan.

    Then again he’s not a fan of the Range Rover, either, reminding me of the old joke: ‘What are the two man-made things you can see from space? The Great Wall of China and Range Rover panel gaps…’

    A full interior valet started the work, with the carpet set removed and cleaned. The ‘teddy bear’ upholstery and trim were cleaned and the damaged plastic trim colour-washed. The scratched rear seat-back was painted, the spare wheel cleaned, painted and tyre-dressed. The whole vehicle was then pressure-washed and steam-cleaned, including the now-Waxoyled underbody. There is still a weird problem with the window-winder mechanisms in both doors, which occasionally refuse to wind all the way down. Somehow, opening the door releases them.

    The matt-black frames, bumpers and front grille were repainted in satin black and it was then time to move on to the engine bay. All of the ancillaries were removed, bead-blasted and new clips fitted. The inside of the bonnet was cleaned and repainted in Tuscan Blue, the inlet manifolds and air cleaner box restored, and the latter repainted and installed with new filters.

    The bodywork was then cleaned and orbitally polished, with special attention given to the paintwork on the arches and edges of the bonnet and tailgate. High-build polish was applied to all areas: “It came up from very dull to surprisingly good,” says Cosovich. “Maybe Leyland paint isn’t so bad after all?”

    Finally, the wheels were removed, orbitally sanded, primed and painted alloy silver and then lacquered. The wheel bolts were painted black and the tyres (described as ‘quite old’) were cleaned and dressed.

    The results are very pleasing indeed; so good, in fact, that while it was in Cosovich’s custody I was made a strong offer to sell the car. I thought about it for a few days and, on balance, reckoned it was the sort of bid that was hard to ignore.
    Trouble was, the man had no time to come and look so it was arranged that the Range Rover would be recovered down to his house for ‘approval’. By the time the car was finished the mystery buyer had evaporated and it was delivered back to my shed looking like a different vehicle.

    Secretly I wasn’t bothered because I had no particular plans to sell it; but, given how good the Range Rover is looking, perhaps now is a good time to let it go (for offers around £40,000).

    The matt black has been replaced by satin. Range Rover looks good enough to sell. Velour ‘teddy bear’ trim has been revived.
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    The Specialist. The increasingly collectible Jensen Interceptor has found a sympathetic home in Wiltshire. Words Martin Buckley. Photography James Mann.

    / #Jensen-Interceptor / #Jensen-FF / #Jensen / #West-Brom-Support / #Pale-Classics-Ltd

    Paul Lewis started #Pale-Classics in 2012, following a career in the RAF as a Flight Engineer on Hercules, 727s and Tristars. (The name ‘Pale’, in case you were wondering, is derived from the first two letters of the founder’s Christian and surnames.) The passion for old cars, however, came long before the aeroplanes. “I restored an MGB when I was 15,” says Lewis. “My dad had a sheet-metal business in Oldham and he let me use a corner of his workshop.”

    Today, as a former chairman of the Jensen Owners’ Club, Lewis is closely associated with Interceptors. At home, wife Lisa runs an Interceptor (and a Volvo Amazon), but Lewis sold his own III to focus on a rebuild of a MkI that, like the cobbler’s boots, has had to take a back seat to customer cars. There are seven or eight Jensens on site in the modern Chippenham workshop, including a four-wheel-drive FF, a ‘Six Pack’ SP and a glorious Interceptor III in Cerise, the end product of a £100,000 restoration that neatly illustrates the amount of detail work – and money – people are now willing to plough into these once-undervalued cars.

    While Lewis would have to accept that he is a Jensen specialist, in some ways he prefers to see Pale Classics, which is situated 10 mins from junction 17 of the M4, as a one-stop shop for all things 1960s and ’70s, but with an emphasis on big GT cars.

    The current seven-man team has worked on everything from Aston Martin DB7s (Pale offers an uprated rear subframe conversion) to Morris 8s and Facel Vegas, and they are as happy to change a light-bulb as they are to take on a full restoration.

    Dave Amor, Danny Williams and Pat Stuart tackle all things mechanical, while promising youngster Peter Griffin started with the firm as an apprentice and has recently been promoted to mechanic. Panel-beater/fabricator Dave Ward has his own purpose-built area set aside for welding and grinding an FF shell. As a general rule, bodywork and painting is farmed out (the choice of bodyshop depending on the customer’s budget) – although Ward can tackle the Interceptor’s notoriously rot-prone sills on site.

    Pale also has an in-house auto electrician who, when we visited, was retrofitting an 8-Track stereo unit upgraded to FM with a modern USB port. Lewis considers the big Jensens to be relatively easy to work on and the spares situation for them to be good, even the MkIs: “The only tricky panels are roofs – the tooling went missing years ago – and FF front wings. I could sell new FF wings for £5000 apiece.”

    Having taken voluntary redundancy from the RAF, Lewis took on the unit on Bumpers Farm Industrial Estate as a glorified ‘man cave’ at first, drifting into taking on jobs and hiring staff as a way of covering the rent. By then, Interceptors were already a way of life. When hunting for an E-type, Lewis rediscovered the Interceptor in one of its natural habitats – a Barons auction – and soon forgot about the Jaguar in favour of this quintessential Euro-American grand tourer, which had the rear seats he needed for his children.

    After that epiphany there was no turning back: before long, he and Lisa were both running IIIs as everyday cars.
    It sounds ruinous but, in a way, the logic is hard to fault: “I had recently bought a Lexus brand new and lost £16,000 on it after a couple of years’ motoring. I decided that it made more sense to run two 7-litre Jensens, on the basis that they were going to go up in value. Also, being collected from school in an Interceptor did wonders for the kids’ popularity.”

    Main: (l-r) Paul Lewis/Dave Amor with one Interceptor, while Peter Griffin polishes another and Andy Teare/ Danny Williams check SP’s wheel bearings. Below, l-r: Amor services V8; Griffin checks electrics; Dave Ward welds Jensen-FF inner wing.

    The knowledge
    Name Pale Classics Ltd
    Address Unit 9-10 Westpoint Business Park, Vincients Road, Bumpers Farm Industrial Estate, Chippenham, Wilts SN14 6RB
    Staff Seven Specialism All aspects of Jensen servicing, maintenance and restoration, with emphasis on the Interceptor and FF
    Price £50 per hour
    Tel 01249 657544
    Email info@paleclassics.co.uk
    Web www.paleclassics.co.uk
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    Martin Buckley
    Martin Buckley joined the group Jensen Interceptor and FF Club
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    CAR: OLDSMOBILE TORONADO

    RUN BY Martin Buckley
    OWNED SINCE November 2017
    PREVIOUS REPORT Sept 2018


    / #1967-Oldsmobile-Toronado / #Oldsmobile / #Oldsmobile-Toronado / #Oldsmobile-Toronado-MkI / #1967

    I’ve had the Toronado 14 months and it still feels different and exciting every time I drive it. The best way to motivate myself to get minor things sorted is the prospect of taking it to an event; it had an invitation to the London Classic Car Show in February, but the plan changed and it wasn’t needed – yet it put some momentum behind getting a few things sorted nevertheless.

    Some of the jobs required are visual irritations, such as the missing passenger-side door button and the cracked cover for the floor-mounted seatbelt reel, which will require me to put an order in to the American parts specialist.
    Meanwhile, I got trimmer Dave Barker to make me a new boot-floor carpet to replace the terrible bit of rubbish that was in there. Ian Sealey at UK Detailing repainted the original pressed-steel air cleaner in matt black (it should be blue, but I went for a bit of artistic licence) to replace the chrome one, which looked a bit too hot-rod.

    The Toronado has never been easy to start from cold, so I got my mechanic Gus Meyer to clear a few days in his schedule to sort the carb, and at the same time fix the leak from the transmission that leaves little pink puddles all over-my shed.

    Gus had to renew the sump gasket, which is usually a straightforward job – drain the fluid, remove the sump, clean the mating surfaces, replace the gasket and refit the sump. On this gearbox, however, Oldsmobile omitted to fit a drain plug, so removing the fluid became an ‘interesting’ operation.

    “I had to remove all the bolts except for the ones along the front of the sump,” said Gus, “then loosen them slowly to allow the sump to tilt towards the rear and let the fluid drain out – or, rather, cascade out, with 50% missing the receptacle underneath.” Messy. Still, the rest went according to plan, the new gasket is now fitted and it looks to be leak-free.

    Another interesting incident was finding the correct transmission fluid. I thought all auto gearbox oil was the same – pink, with a very specific and not unpleasant whiff – but apparently not. “The original spec was a Type A,” explained Gus, “which is now almost obsolete. According to the internet, the successors went along the lines of Type A to Type A suffix A, then onto Dexron and Dexron II.

    “Comma claims that its ATF AQM is a suitable replacement for the earlier Type A suffix A, so that is what I used.” It’s worth checking if you are running something old with an automatic in it.

    Replacing points and condenser was simple, using the tune-up kit pal Merrill Benfield brought over in the summer, as was setting the dwell angle and renewing the oil-pressure sensor, which was also leaking. Gus traced the cold-start issue to a non-functioning acceleration pump plunger seal. A new carb kit is on order, but he managed a temporary repair for now. The next job will be to set up the automatic choke and fast idle, once Gus has worked out the grainy pictures in the workshop manual.

    One thing I must remember to do is replace the fuel sender: the current one is vague, and I blessed the spare can of fuel that previous owner Marko left in the boot when I ran out last summer. I suspect the drum-type speedo tells similar fibs; coming back from the Bibury Classic Car Hub on a summer evening, I thought I was doing well in the Toronado until a pal in an Aston V8 went past as if I was at a standstill. We did all the local shows last year and got some nice comments.

    At the Tetbury Classic Car Show I had an interesting chat with a guy from the Ford Corsair Owners’ Club and told him about the one I used to play in as a kid on my auntie’s farm in Worcestershire circa 1971. I had to smile when he asked if I could find out if it’s still there!

    The Oldsmobile is the perfect art installation for The Shed, and never fails to generate interest or start a conversation. Martin’s mum Barbara tries Olds for size Dave Barker measures up for boot carpet. Ruby the dog enjoys the vast, comfy cabin. Buckley’s futuristic Toronado on show at Kemble airfield, with suitable jet-age backdrop.
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    CHEVROLET CORVAIR MONZA SPYDER

    RUN BY Martin Buckley
    OWNED SINCE August 2016
    PREVIOUS REPORT Nov 2017

    / #Chevrolet-Corvair-Monza-Spyder / #Chevrolet-Corvair-Monza / #Chevrolet-Corvair / #Chevrolet / #GM

    The Corvair is now running. In fact, I commuted to my shed in it for a whole week in November before a carburettor leak stopped play (probably caused by a blocked fuel filter and/or a rusty fuel tank). A few electrical things remain on the to-do list, and I haven’t worked out yet how to make the heater function – although warm air does waft in from somewhere.

    But the point is that the car is on the road after months – possibly even years – of frustration. You may recall that I destroyed the diff in 2017 and decided to give the engine some love, on the basis that it had to come out anyway. The diff turned up in the post one morning from Clark’s Corvair – a nice surprise for me, if not for the delivery driver.
    Meanwhile, I ordered a variety of additional parts (standard rings, gaskets, a seal for the turbo and engine-shroud seals) and sent the heads over to Gardias Engine Services in Witney to lap the valves and re-cut the seats.

    By the end of May, my master mechanic Gus had everything he needed and was all set to rebuild the #flat-six . But he’s a busy boy with his Mercedes work and it wasn’t until September that he called to say it was time to get the car back to him in Swindon. A month later, Gus drove the Corvair over to me with instructions to use it and see how I get on. It starts easily and is pleasant to drive – I’m not sure what I was expecting, performance-wise, but the vacuum gauge on the dash indicates that the turbo is working. What I can say is that it feels relatively sluggish in first and second but seems to get on its toes in third and pulls well. Reading contemporary reports, this sounds about right but I can’t tell you much about what speeds it gets up to – the speedometer is stuck at 90mph. Also, the rev counter seems to be running some way behind.

    The gearchange is on the stiff side but the clutch is light and the brakes are effective enough, if slightly wooden in feel. The engine has a lovely growl and, because Gus has had the various shrouds repainted, it looks smart. I still need to rescue its battery from a Datsun Fairlady (it’s a peculiarly long, tall shape) and Gus would like to tidy up the wiring and cure a small oil leak.

    One thing that desperately needed sorting was the window in the hood, which afforded virtually zero rear vision and was plain dangerous on the road. However, once my father-in-law had attacked it with a buffing wheel and fine cutting paste, a huge improvement was achieved. The hood is pretty good otherwise, as are the white plastic seats and red carpets.

    But what you really want to know about is the handling. The truth is, I have not had a proper play with it, but even without the important differential between front and rear tyre pressures it feels very acceptable. Dropping the fronts by 10lb gives a lot more weight to the light, low-geared steering, and even then you can virtually park the Corvair with one finger. You would have to be quite committed to get into trouble, but I’ll give it a try and get back to you. The car’s future on the fleet is still in the balance, but the more I look at it, the more I like the Corvair. It is cheeky-looking but elegant, with a pretty tail treatment. These aesthetic observations have gone over the head of my wife, who was traumatised by towing me back to the shed when the diff ate itself and has also been watching hours of YouTube films showing them flipping on their sides.

    However, she’s the sort of person who would drive a skip if you told her it was a convertible, so I predict a more positive attitude in this parish when the sun comes out.

    THANKS TO
    Δ Gardias Engine Services: 01993 703053
    Δ Clark’s Corvair: www.corvair.com
    Δ Gus Meyer

    All painted, the engine looks in fine fettle

    Gus Meyer rebuilt the engine, and gave strict instructions: “Drive it and see how it goes”

    The Corvair is back on the road, but its time could soon be up – unless it continues to charm
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    A MATTER OF A OPINION? #Jaguar / #Jaguar-AJ16

    Why oh why do you employ writers like Skelton?

    His diatribe on the #Jaguar-XJS / #Jaguar-XJ-S is exactly the type of thing that Clarkson would write and puts the classic car industry and hobby back years.

    It’s not the car’s fault that he is too big to fit in it, it’s not the car’s fault that he has chosen a pre-facelift 3.6 car to write about, possibly the worst of the entire breed of XJS. That car was built in the ’80s and he seems to expect it to be as accommodating as a modern Eurobox. He should try driving a facelift from ’1995-’1996 with the sublimely smooth #Jaguar-XJS-AJ16 engine and matching auto box which makes driving one of these fine machines a total pleasure. Note that I said auto box, for yes, the car was badged as a GT! Not a sports car but one to waft down to Monte Carlo with the minimum of fuss and effort.

    I do sometimes wonder why media such as yours, that is clearly aimed at the classic car fraternity write such rubbish and employ such people like Skelton to write it. As my late father used to say, “if you can’t find anything nice to say (write) about someone or something, then don’t say (write) it at all.” Shame on you as well for even agreeing to publish it.

    Thankfully, there is a huge following for this car, and its enthusiasts’ club recognises the importance of the car that saved Jaguar.
    • People - and what they like - are all different. And my experiences of XJ-S’s on a personal level aren’t great. I’ve driven V12 autos, #Jaguar-AJ6 mPeople - and what they like - are all different. And my experiences of XJ-S’s on a personal level aren’t great. I’ve driven V12 autos, #Jaguar-AJ6 manuals, AJ6/16 autos from before and after the facelift, and across all three body styles - and very few have felt like they should.

      That’s not the fault of the breed as a whole, it’s because somewhere down the line someone’s skimped on care - as with any expensive car that could once be bought for peanuts. This 3.6 was one of the good ones. But that night in November 2016, when suffering whiplash, trying to navigate some very tight roads and then being barely able to get out, my dislike of the best XJ-S I’d ever driven tainted them. I wished I hadn’t bothered, and when you’re talking about something as emotive as a British GT, apathy is the quickest way to spoil it.

      If someone wants to give me a late 4.0 and a nice road on a nice day to try to change my mind, please do. I want to like the XJ-S, because were it not for the niggles it’d come close to being the best Jaguar of all time. That’s what makes them frustrating for me, and why I’m so emotive about the things that spoil them.
        More ...
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