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    Richard Heseltine

    Fiat Barchetta Tipo-183 Open Group

    Fiat Barchetta 1995-2002 / 2004-2005

    The Barchetta was developed between 1990 to 1994, under the project name Tipo B Spider 176. It was designed by Andreas Zapatinas and Alessandro Cavazza, under the supervision of Peter Barrett Davis and other car designers at the Centro Stile Fiat, and prototyping was carried out by Stola.
    <...br /> Production began in February 1995 and lasted until June 2005, with a brief pause, due to the bankruptcy of coachbuilder Maggiora. The Barchetta was based on the chassis of the Mark 1 Fiat Punto. The Barchetta has 1,747 cc DOHC petrol engine fitted with variable camshaft timing, used for the first time in a Fiat production car, after being patented in 1970.

    The engine has 132 PS (97 kW; 130 hp) and 164 N⋅m (121 lb⋅ft) of torque. The Barchetta weighs 1056 kg (2328 lb) without air conditioning and can accelerate to 100 km/h (62 mph) in 8.9 seconds and has a top speed of 200 km/h (124 mph).

    It came in various trim levels which offered different features, for example, diamond cross stitch, patterned red leather instead of the standard black leather or fabric seats, alloy wheels instead of steel wheels, or fog-lights as an option. Arguably one of the biggest external cosmetic changes was made by the addition of the third brake light, first introduced by Fiat on the Lido and Riviera in 2000, and on sub models thereafter.

    The Barchetta was revised in August 2003, for its relaunch the following year, with some alterations inside and out. The most notable changes were the revised front spoiler and rear bumper. Production of the car eventually stopped in June 2005.
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    Richard Heseltine
    Richard Heseltine joined the group Fiat Coupe Tipo-175
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    Richard Heseltine
    Great Reader
    Loves reading through articles.
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    / #Rolla-Vollstedt 1918-2017 / #Indy-500 / #1964 / #IndyCar

    An unconventional star of racing, says Richard Heseltine

    From street racing in the ’30s to upsetting the Indy establishment by installing a woman to drive his car at The Brickyard, Rolla Vollstedt did things his own way. He took on the US motor racing elite from his basement, gave a leg-up to a legion of future stars and even ran the sainted Jim Clark in his last-ever Champ Car outing.

    As he told Octane when interviewed for issue 55 in 2007, Vollstedt was a racer to the core. Of German descent, he arrived in Portland, Oregon, aged two. As a teenager he terrorised the neighbourhood in a ’37 Buick while working at Frank Costanzo’s speed shop. Called up for WW2 and having landed at Omaha Beach on D-Day, he was awarded a Purple Heart after stopping a bullet.

    In peacetime, he picked up from where he left off, racing a Lincoln-engined roadster on dirt ovals. Realising his talents lay elsewhere, he installed local man Len Sutton in his car in 1947 and the partnership led to countless honours on the Pacific Northwest before a first run in the Indy-500 in 1964 with a Vollstedt-made, mid-engined single-seater.

    Sutton qualified eighth and was running fourth at the halfway mark when the fuel pump broke. Vollstedt would never win in 21 attempts, but gave early rides to Mario Andretti, George Follmer and the pioneering Janet Guthrie (above, on left, with Vollstedt). After entering a car for Emerson Fittipaldi for the 1984 Indy 500, Vollstedt turned his hand to restoring vintage oval racers.
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    Richard Heseltine
    Richard Heseltine joined the group Alfa Romeo SZ / RZ Club
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    / #Leo-Kinnunen 1943-2017 Always genial Finnish driver who set the fastest-ever #Targa-Florio lap / #Porsche-917K / #Porsche / #Porsche-917

    When Leo Kinnunen lined up on the grid for the start of the #1974-Swedish-Grand-Prix , he created a bit of history on the quiet: this permasmiling trailblazer became the first Finnish driver ever to participate in a round of the Formula 1 World Championship.

    He retired from the race aboard his privateer Surtees TS16 and failed to make the cut in other points-paying rounds that season, but if his status as an F1 one-hit wonder in terms of starts gives the impression that Kinnunen was something of a tail-end Charlie, a gentleman driver who was in above his head, then nothing could be further from the truth. His sole GP outing was a mere downward blip in an otherwise glittering career.

    Kinnunen, who died on 26 July aged 73, enjoyed a highly successful career that spanned almost 20 years, campaigning all manner of machines on two wheels and four. Nevertheless, he is best remembered for taming the mighty Porsche 917. After a few years racing motorcycles in the early 1960s, he rose to prominence in rallying, autocross and ice racing before switching to single-seaters in 1967. Kinnunen raced an outdated Brabham to a single victory in the national Formula 3 series, beating Ronnie Peterson in the process, before making the switch to sports cars. In 1969, he won the hotly contested Nordic Cup, which led to the invitation to test for the works Porsche team.

    Kinnunen landed a full-time seat for 1970 and won first time out in the Daytona 24 Hours, sharing a Porsche-917K with Pedro Rodríguez. The Finnish-Mexican duo also claimed honours in subsequent International Championship of Makes rounds at Brands Hatch and Monza, and he shone in that year’s Targa Florio aboard the latest 908/03. Kinnunen drove much of the distance after Rodríguez was taken ill, finishing second behind the sister car of Brian Redman/Jo Siffert. Kinnunen somehow mustered a 33min 36sec lap of Circuito Piccolo delle Madonie on his final tour, and this blistering new record was never eclipsed. He finished third in the 1973 Targa, too, sharing a 911 RSR with Claude Haldi.

    Kinnunen also excelled in the Interserie championship, the European equivalent of Can-Am, steering variants of 917 to consecutive titles in 1971-73. He claimed 18 outright wins and 11 heat victories over three seasons, and was still a factor in the World Endurance Championship up to 1977, when he retired from circuit racing. Despite staying away from track action, Kinnunen continued to dabble in other disciplines. He had dovetailed race and rally programmes for much of the 1970s, his third place on the 1973 1000 Lakes Rally behind Timo Makinen and Marku Alén being a stand-out performance. He continued to compete off-piste to the end of the decade, claiming outright honours on the 1979 Arctic Rally among others. Kinnunen remained a strong supporter of motor sport after hanging up his helmet, becoming a close friend and supporter of Valtteri Bottas among other fellow countrymen who followed in his wheeltracks. Sadly, Kinnunen was wheelchair-bound for the last ten years of his life after suffering a massive stroke, but he never lost his sunny disposition.
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    Richard Heseltine
    Richard Heseltine joined the group Le Mans forever
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