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    Werk II, Zuffenhausen, Stuttgart Porsche / #Porsche-911 / #Porsche-911-993 / #Porsche-911-Carrera-2 / #Porsche-911-Carrera-2-993

    An 86-year-old #Ferry-Porsche , who was responsible for the first-ever #Porsche car sold by the company in 1948, stands alongside the millionth example nearly 50 years later. The car in question, a 993 Carrera 2 with VarioRam, was given to the German highway patrol, where it served for ten years before being handed back to Porsche. Today it can be found on display in the Museum, just the other side of Porscheplatz from where it first rolled out into the Stuttgart sunlight.
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    Johann Venter
    Johann Venter uploaded 13 photos in the album 1969 Porsche 911 T.
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    Behind The Scenes On Our 1969 #Porsche 911 T Film

    / #1969-Porsche-911T / #1969 / #Porsche-911T / #Porsche-911

    Each week, with every one of our films, our goal is to bring you not only the cars you love, but the kinds of stories that speak to our shared interests from an individual’s perspective. This week we join an old favorite in the form of this 1969 911 T as we follow Kurht Gerhardt through his favorite driving spots during Los Angeles’ early hours.

    After a stint owning some classic Italian steel, Kurht decided that he wanted to hang onto the romance of the vintage experience, but in a package that was altogether more reliable and decidedly easier to find parts and service options for. “I wanted something that was efficient, and that ran right, and that I could get into and just drive.”


    An early 901 Porsche fit the criteria, and so he bought two. It might sound strange to label this one-to-two car swap as an instance of reduction, but looking past the size of the garage space required that’s just what’s happened here. The 911, and the T, or Touring, model especially so, is a very simple car. It’s not fitted with extra functionality or many amenities to dilute the driving feel and feedback provided in such a lightweight and focused sports car. This holds true for all early 901 chassis, but it’s the T that’s the most stripped-down model in the range, and arguably the most pleasurable experience because of it.


    It’s every bit as quick as he needs it to be, and outside of an R, the T can be considered the Porsche that’s been reduced to the maximum degree — not in the sense of loss in the negative though, but rather that its simplicity adds to the driving characteristics and overall temperament by way of not getting in the way; the T channels a level of purity, of unrefined Porsche personality.

    So what does Kurht do to take advantage of this? “One of my favorite things to do is to get up at like six, seven o’clock in the morning on a Sunday.” Living in LA, these early morning weekend hours are the most opportune time to have the weave of the city streets all to yourself, and as you can see in the film, Kurht makes good use of the space available in the first hours of light. It’s a time when the city is still quiet, and the urban and mountain roads alike can offer their true potential to the drivers who seek it.

    He also plans to participate in the Peking to Paris race in 2019, taking the dizzying 8,500-mile route as an opportunity to live out a dream of his. “I can’t wait to get out in the Porsche and camp and just rough it,” he says, “being out in the middle of nowhere for six weeks, it’s going to be an amazing adventure.”

    In the meantime though, he will continue driving the snot out of this sweet piece of Porsche history, and it’s a plan he has stretched out into the furthest future too; “It’s something I want to keep for life because it’s such a solid car. No matter what, it just keeps on running, and you can beat it up a bit and you can haul ass and it still does great. It starts up every day.”

    This is how you use a classic car and wring the most out of it, this is how you Drive Tastefully.
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    For many buyers, asset performance is now more important than driving performance

    Just looking #Porsche-911 / #Porsche

    This year has seen one of the hottest trading runs ever for pre-owned Porsches. This has been fuelled by strong sales of cars under ten years old, combined with a long overdue market correction for the classics that continues to bring values towards the levels of Ferrari and the other Italian exotica. The buoyant market has resulted in me driving a remarkable selection of Porsches over the past six months. I can't complain my job doesn’t have its benefits! The most active and exciting sector has been the classic Porsches – everything from the very first 911s and 912s through 944 Turbos and S2s to the blue chip 993 Turbo. Sadly though, as I flick through my road test impressions on these cars, I'm left with a feeling that for many buyers asset performance is now more important than driving performance.
    The first Porsche that really brought this home was a 964 Turbo 3.6. The seller claimed the car was the best thing since sliced bread and priced it accordingly. The 964 Turbo is the best of the single turbo 911 Turbos, but at 1470kg it is a heavy car. That weight combined with the fierce power delivery adds up to a point-and-squirt machine – some way from the being the all-round performer that is the hallmark of a good 911.

    That accolade would take some justifying on the 996 GT2 also. A few weeks back I was checking boost levels one fresh morning along a straight country road and I didn't spot some overhanging trees ahead, shading the asphalt. This beast doesn't have traction control and it duly served up a tank slapper as the tyres found what was left of the morning dew. I caught it, but the experience underlines why this car is not for the inexperienced.

    964 RS values have gone into orbit and everybody is complaining they should have bought one years ago when they were £25,000. As a driver's car, the 964 RS is a cracker and deserves its value upswing. It’s the driver's benchmark for any late, air-cooled 911, being more edgy than the 993 version – another ingredient I love in a good 911. The great thing is that a standard 964 Carrera can provide some of the same thrills and experience for a fraction of the cost and, if you want to, it’s easily upgraded to RS spec. I drove a 964 C that had been modified as such and it was a peach in terms of delivering pure driving fun for a fraction of RS prices. While the top spec Porsches have always grabbed the headlines, we tend to forget that the entry level 911s have always offered the ability to put a smile on their driver’s faces. That applies to the 993 as much as a 964. Two ’94 Carreras demonstrated the truth of the old adage that there’s always a 911 better than the one you can afford, but that doesn't mean the more affordable cars are any less fun.

    Another stand out was a very enjoyable run in a great 944 S2. I've always been a 944 Turbo fan and these two water pumpers may arguably lay claim to being the best built cars Porsche ever made. What the cars have in spades is fantastic cornering balance and a strong family of engines. Pointedly, somebody commented recently that perhaps 944 drivers are the only classic Porsche drivers who really enjoy driving their cars today (as many classic 911s are hooked up to cash generators and tucked away in cocoons). Is that controversial or what?

    I've logged a long and enjoyable list of Boxsters, Caymans, 996s and 997s this year, but two specials were notable – a Cayman R, which delivered the same character as the old 968 Club Sport and surprisingly, has been somewhat neglected by the modern classic seekers because it still has a way to go on the depreciation curve. The other was a 2012 997 GTS, which using the 968 comparison, could be described as a 968 Sport with all the toys. The Powerkit’s extra 23hp over the DFI-engined 997 Carrera S gives the car more flexibility to snap overtake, but you can’t escape the firm ride.

    But call me biased (as I have one), my overall benchmark for any 911 remains the 1972-’73 2.4 911S. In the past weeks I’ve driven three really brilliant 2.4s, the two Ss included an astonishing original and a French restored ‘made as new’ restoration. The third T was a mature restoration from the 1990s. What marked these cars out as undiluted driving machines was their combination of lightness, peaky power (for the S) and handling edginess that demands your full attention. They are also cars that take time and practice to drive well. Next to the S, the T isn’t intimidating at all and showed that as with the basic 964 and 993s, the Cinderella models really earn their Porsche badge.

    Today, we often launch straight into values when talking about collectible Porsches, but we shouldn't forget that the best driver’s cars aren't necessarily the most expensive.
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