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Alfa Romeo
Alfa Romeo club

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  1.   Alfa Romeo
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Alfa Romeo 147 937A / 937
  1.   Alfa Romeo
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Alfa Romeo 156 Type 932 1997-2007
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Alfa Romeo 166 (Type 936) 1998-2007
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GTV 1994-2005 916C-Series and Alfa Romeo Spider 916S
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Alfa Romeo 164 / Type 164 / 1987-1998 / Also called Alfa Romeo 168
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Alfa-Romeo-8C
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Alfa-Romeo Giulia Type-105 1962 - 1978
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Alfa-Romeo-155 Type-167 1992 - 1998
  1.   Alfa Romeo
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Alfa-Romeo-SZ 1989 - 1994
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Alfa-Romeo-4C-Type-960
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04/1979 - 04/1987
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Alfa Romeo 6C
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All new 2015 Alfa Romeo Giulia Typo 952
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Alfa Romeo Alfetta GTV
  1.   Alfa Romeo
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Alfa Romeo Alfasud 1973-1984 When a car is rare even in its homeland, you know there aren’t many left anywhere. But unlike Brits, the Italians didn’t take to the Alfasud. Proper Alfas were made in ...
Alfa Romeo Alfasud 1973-1984

When a car is rare even in its homeland, you know there aren’t many left anywhere. But unlike Brits, the Italians didn’t take to the Alfasud. Proper Alfas were made in the Northern city of Milan, not down south in goatherding country. And they weren’t front-wheel drive, either.

The UK took to the 1973 Sud instantly. The combination of an appealing Giugiaro shape, incredible handling and a rorty exhaust note was just too much when combined with a three-spoke steering wheel and a typical Alfa style dash – the 1974 Ti added five speeds and four headlamps, spoilers front and rear plus another 5 bhp from that revvy little 1200 flat-four.

By 1979, the Sud had provided the lion’s share of a record sales year of around 12,000 cars for Alfa Romeo GB. But by then, early M registration cars were being welded up or scrapped after major MoT failures and Alfa sales began a sharp decline as word spread. The Sud didn’t just rust like an old Escort, it exploded with ferrous oxide. You couldn’t stop it. As I know from painful personal experience, rust appeared in the middle of a panel for no apparent reason, wings practically fell off and terminal rot killed off sills, inner wings and vital box sections. Alfa made a big noise in 1978 about using zincrometal in various places and an improved rust protection process but they rusted out just the same although 1981-onwards Series 3 cars were slightly less disgraceful.

Rusty and worthless, Suds were bought cheap, driven hard and then scrapped when an MoT was too big a hurdle. There are almost no Series One (pre-1978) cars on the road now and no 1973 or 1974 cars on the road in the UK. While the Alfasud showcased what Alfa could do with regards to making drivers’ cars, it showed also just how badly they could be made, and the other ’70s Alfas were equally bad.
  1.   Alfa Romeo
  2.    Public
ALFA 75 In many ways the 75 was the last of the ‘proper’ Alfas, certainly the last to be designed by the firm as an independent marque before Fiat took full control in 1986 and the last of the firm...
ALFA 75

In many ways the 75 was the last of the ‘proper’ Alfas, certainly the last to be designed by the firm as an independent marque before Fiat took full control in 1986 and the last of the firm’s models to be rear-driven. With the evergreen twin-cam engine and the rear-mounted transaxle, it had its roots in the ’70s Alfetta and was launched in May 1985, the year of Alfa Romeo’s 75th anniversary, hence the name.

Essentially a heavily facelifted version of the older Giulietta, with which is shared its doors, the 75 was launched with the four-pot twin cam engines, but was livened up no end in 1986 when the 2.5-litre V6 was installed, later taken out to 3-litres in 1987 when it was joined by the twin-plug Twin Spark version of the 2-litre twin-cam.

Even today, the sound of a 75 in full flight, whether it’s the twin-cam or V6 is instantly recognisable and their balanced handling makes them a joy to drive fast… even if you do get the famous Alfa ankle cramp after an hour behind the wheel. You also get Alfa idiosyncracies like electric-adjust mirror only on the passenger side and the window switches mounted in a roof console.

The shift linkage to that rear-mounted gearbox can be a touch rubbery but with it all adjusted nicely and the suspension properly set-up the Alfa 75 has a character which is pure Italian and you just can’t help but drive it like you stole it. Purists prefer the Twin Spark, since the heavier V6 engine does tend to increase understeer. What’s more, parts support from the classic Alfa specialists is excellent.

How much? £500-£5000
  1.   Alfa Romeo
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Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint 101-SERIES Coupe Club
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Alfa Romeo 2600 series 106 Club
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Alfa Romeo Montreal Club
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Alfa Romeo Spider / Duetto club / Looking for a two-seater open-top classic for around the £10,000 mark? Paul Guinness offers an array of different models from a variety of eras… so which will you cho...
Alfa Romeo Spider / Duetto club / Looking for a two-seater open-top classic for around the £10,000 mark? Paul Guinness offers an array of different models from a variety of eras… so which will you choose?

Alfa’s gorgeous looking Spider of the late ’60s received its biggest visual change at the start of the next decade, when the original sloping rear end of the Duetto was replaced by the squarer ‘Kamm’ tail design. It was still a great looking car, though – and when the 1750 was dropped in favour of the 2000 Spider Veloce in 1971, it also had the power to go with its latest look.

Under the bonnet sat Alfa’s superb 2.0-litre twin cam powerplant, a highrevving engine that’s still as much of a joy to listen to as it is to pilot, aided by twin Dellorto carbs and – depending on the age and spec of your Spider – an output of around 135bhp. That makes a Spider a far livelier drive than MGB owners might be used to, complemented by sharp steering and nifty handling. The ultra-low driving position adds to the feeling of fun, with any Spider oozing typically Italian charisma.

Get one on a winding A-road and you’ll be able to exploit its power, the rev-happy engine sounding better the harder you work it. There’s no shortage of mid-range acceleration for fast overtaking, and when the bends come the Alfa’s grippy back end and overall ‘sharpness’ adds to the general entertainment.

With so much going for the classic Spider, it’s little wonder that values have been increasing in recent years, although the later S3/S4 models (of 1983-on) are relatively easy to find within budget. The 1970-on S2 is pricier, but most purists reckon it’s worth the extra expenditure.
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