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Alfa-Romeo Giulia Type-105 1962 - 1978 More
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  • No brakes in the rainfall
    CAR: 1967-Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Super / 1967 / Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Super / Alfa-Romeo-Giulia / Alfa-Romeo

    OWNER: Evan Klein

    / #1967-Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Super / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Super-Type-105 / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Saloon / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Type-105 / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Saloon-Type-105 / #Alfa-Romeo / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Super / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Berlina / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Berlina-Type-105 / #1967 / #1967-Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Super-Type-105 / #Marelli-Plex-electronic-ignition / #Marelli-Plex / #dual-Weber / #Weber

    That’s right, it’s 100% reliable. At least that’s what I tell everyone. Seems Alfas run great for short periods of time. I’m starting to become embarrassed when the car breaks; it doesn’t leave me stranded, it just, well, doesn’t do what it’s supposed to. And if I do tell anyone, I have to put up with the ‘Why don’t you get something new?’ speech.
    Last month, at the height of the Los Angeles rain-storms, the brake master cylinder failed, leaving me without brakes. OK, no problem, I’ll just carefully drive to the shop using that horrible under-dash handbrake. The traffic was horrendous, bumper-to-bumper, rain coming down in buckets. At one point I was following a motorcycle officer. If he only knew. Fortunately I arrived without incident. We lifted her up and pulled the brake master. A rebuilt Bonaldi unit was standing by; we put it on but it didn’t work. No pressure. What to do now? Its not like these single-circuit units are off-the-shelf items.

    We searched the shop, and with a stroke of luck found an original ATE rebuild kit. So we rebuilt my original, bolted it in and it worked. I had brakes, glorious, glorious, brakes again. King of the Road. We ate doughnuts to celebrate.
    That was Wednesday. On Thursday the brake pedal became very hard; the brake servo had decided to quit. Back to the shop. Have you priced a servo lately? Executive decision: let’s get rid of the servo and run a straight line.

    Now I had brakes again, test drive around the block, perfect. But I got a ‘Pop the hood’ request upon returning, the engine sounding funny and running on two cylinders. Bad gas? Carbs out of sync? Time for yet more fiddling. If it wasn’t for Guru Benny I would be driving something new. Everything is sorted now, I don’t smell of gas, my hands are clean. I have told no one; as far as the wife knows, the Alfa is 100% reliable.

    Above and below Giulia gets uncharacteristically wet during los angeles rain-storm; original master cylinder now rebuilt.
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  •   Evan Klein reacted to this post about 2 years ago
    Anger management

    CAR 1967 Alfa Romeo Giulia Saloon

    OWNER Evan Klein

    / #1967-Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Super / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Super-Type-105 / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Saloon / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Type-105 / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Saloon-Type-105 / #Alfa-Romeo / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Super / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Berlina / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Berlina-Type-105 / #1967 / #1967-Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Super-Type-105 / #Marelli-Plex-electronic-ignition / #Marelli-Plex / #dual-Weber / #Weber

    The guy was standing in the middle of the parking lot with his back to the car, wearing goofy red gym shorts and a puffy green jacket. To get his attention, I did what any gearhead would do with unfiltered dual Webers and a straight-through exhaust: I blipped the throttle. He spun around with a startled look and we locked eyes – it was actor Adam Sandler. He looked down at the Giulia and a huge smile spread across his face as he pointed at the car. I blipped again and smiled back.

    That’s the thing about classic cars: you can’t get mad at them. And it’s why I love the random nature of Los Angeles. Sure, I could have jumped out of the car and chatted to him, but no, a smile would do.

    The Giulia has had a busy month, trying to keep up with exotic cars in La Jolla at the concours show, and getting some new parts. I’d fitted a set of sport cams from Alfa guru Richard Jemison, then noticed one carb was having problems. No matter what we did, the air/ fuel mixture screws weren’t responding. We cleaned it and tried again, but still no go.

    Hmm. A rebuild? All the labour and parts would cost the same as a new carb, so, executive decision: new carbs. Done. And the car fired at first try. Once it had warmed up, the difference was Jekyll and Hyde; this thing was a little monster now, although I noticed a slight hesitation on initial throttle.

    Time to check out the distributor, #Marelli Plex electronic ignition, and idle jets. I compared my car’s distributor with another, on which the weights swing further out and the springs are smaller, giving more advance. And so we swapped the parts, checked the timing, and decided to go down a size in jets.

    Time for another trip around the block. Yes, it’s still fast but this time there’s no hesitation on take-off, and it pulls to the redline and then some without fuss. It is everything it should be. And I’ve now got my hands on a European airbox too, which will complete the look under the bonnet.

    As for the old carbs, once they were off, we saw that gas had been blowing against the back of the butterflies and not into the chamber. Easy fix, maybe. But the Alfa runs great and that’s the goal: more time driving, less time fixing.

    Above and below New cams, new carbs, and an ignition rebuild. The result? Hotter performance for this LA daily driver.
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  •   Evan Klein reacted to this post about 2 years ago
    Belt up, kids

    OWNER: Mark Sommer

    CAR: #1969-Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Saloon / #1969 / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Saloon / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Type-105 / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Saloon-Type-105 / #Alfa-Romeo /

    One of the reasons I bought my Alfa was so the whole family could enjoy it. Now that it’s back in the UK, the first job was to have seatbelts fitted, both in the front and, more importantly, the back, so that my sons (seven and nine) can travel in their car seats.

    Quickfit Safety Belt Service, this year celebrating 55 years in the business, is based in Middlesex. They were recomended by a few people I knew who had used them for their classic cars. Sales manager Pawel helped me decide on the best belts for my car: it would have to be inertia-reel type in the rear for the boys, and I decided to go for those in the front too, opting for comfort and security over period appeal.

    Although they have a large selection of coloured webbing and lots of finishes for the clasps, I decided to go for simple black webbing and black plastic clasps, which would suit the simple, mainly black trim of the Giulia best.

    I travelled up to Middlesex with my father-in-law David, arriving first thing as fitting would take at least six hours and I wanted to drive the car back home that day.

    Pawel ushered me into the workshop, next to an #Alfa-Romeo-SZ that had just had a rear seat fitted, to make it a 2+2, and a Bentley Continental that was also being fitted with seatbelts.

    While my car was being stripped out, Pawel showed us around the premises, including the sewing room where belts are made on the day of fitment, after trim has been removed, to ensure they fit correctly. It was decided that the rear belts should be installed through the boot onto the rear parcel shelf, and the fronts simply fixed onto the floor beside the seats.

    David and I took off for a visit to the Hendon RAF museum, just a short taxi ride away, and returned to find the Alfa ready to drive home – fully equipped with its latest modification. The seatbelts didn’t look out of place and I couldn’t resist taking the family out when I got home – in complete safety.

    THANKS TO Quickfit Safety Belt Service, www.quickfitsbs.com

    From top Mark’s Giulia in Quickfit workshop with SZ and Continental; rear seat removed to make way for fitting; choice of webbing and clasps; the finished article.
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  •   Mark Sommer reacted to this post about 2 years ago
    / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Super-Type-105 / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Saloon / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Type-105 / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Saloon-Type-105 / #Alfa-Romeo / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Super / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Berlina / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Berlina-Type-105

    Remember those hopeless Alfa police cars in The Italian Job? They never caught up with Michael Caine’s Mini Coopers – but they should have. The Giulia’s twin-cam 1570cc engine could hit 109mph, and at 0-60mph in 12sec it could outrun a Cooper S. Sadly, all the cheap ones have gone. Around £20k seems to be the benchmark price in Europe but values for rare right-hand-drive cars are slightly lower in the UK.

    Alfisti appreciate what a great handling saloon this is with just 1000kg, neutral steering and fine balance and they rate it as one of the best-driving Alfas of the period. Best Auto in Italy has a restored #1964 left-hand-drive 1600TI in grey with 10,000km since resto for £21,100 and by the time you read this Historics at Brooklands will have sold a very rare right-hand-drive ’1968 in burgundy that was originally Alfa UK’s Sloane Street demonstrator. It needs some light bodywork but is shiny with 70,000 miles and ready to drive away with a very tempting estimate of just £8k-£12k. Last year Historics sold a ‘1967 blue right-hand-drive 1600 with huge history and recent rally successes for £16,800.

    The peppy 1290cc versions are just as bewitching, look equally lovely and run at less money – £15k buys a very good one. But they’re more numerous and you’d be better finding a well-restored 1600 because they’ve got the greatest long-term potential and desirability factor. Best of all, the 105 Series Giulia 1600 saloon radiates as much Italian cool as vintage Lambretta scooters and Sixties Gaggia coffee machines. I think they’re gorgeous.

    VALUE 2012 £9.5k

    VALUE NOW 2017/8 £15k
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  •   Mark Sommer reacted to this post about 2 years ago
    The good, the bad and the Super

    Car: #1967-Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Super / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Super-Type-105 / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Saloon / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Type-105 / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Saloon-Type-105 / #Alfa-Romeo / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Super / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Berlina / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Berlina-Type-105 / #1967 / #1967-Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Super-Type-105

    Owner: Evan Klein

    The Giulia has been earning her keep. I took her up to Monterey this year for Pebble Beach and did all the usual stops: McCall’s, The Quail, Historics at Laguna, Lemons, and Concorso Italiano. I must say she did wonderfully, didn’t miss a beat. The nice thing too is that, when you drive a classic, they have a tendency to wave you in, with a lot of ‘Please sir, right this way’.

    One trick I learned was that parking at Pebble is horrible no matter what time you arrive. I got there at 4am (it was still dark), parked as close as I could and walked down to the field. Here’s the trick: they’re going to tow you, and you must accept this as fact. The car is 50 years old and it’s an Alfa; it’s not like it’s never been towed. But at Pebble it’s a complimentary tow. To a private, secure lot five minutes away. More like a valet service than a punishment.

    The Giulia’s other big adventure was the Targa Baja rally in Mexico, for which 32 classics met in San Diego and crossed the border into Tecate for four days of high-speed driving on the best roads in Mexico. From Porsches and BMWs to Alfas, any classic is welcome to enter.

    We climbed the mountains and followed the coast, the federales escorting us through the congested parts so we could parade quickly through the cities. In Tecate we stopped to gather at the main square for a welcome from the mayor and made the news – the locals waved flags and everyone was friendly. From there we headed up La Rumorosa, a stunning and treacherous drive on a desert mountain road, where it’s not uncommon to see 18-wheelers on their sides. We finished by the water in Ensenada, with a line-up of classics. Very impressive.

    On day three, the group headed into the mountains and an altitude of 9000ft – but, as we made our way out of town, the Alfa started backfiring and wouldn’t rev beyond 3500rpm. Oh no. So I pulled off the road and we gathered around the open hood. It was the ignition system. It had failed.

    Navigator Nick and myself decided not to hang around Mexico and to flatbed the Alfa back to Los Angeles. All my #Alfa-Romeo stories seem to involve a flatbed. Back at the shop on the Monday, we swapped the distributor back to Marelli Plex, cranked the ignition, and she was purring like the car I adore. And now it’s time to make a run to the grocery store, because she still has to earn her keep.
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  •   Mark Sommer reacted to this post about 2 years ago
    Time to fire up the Alfa

    Car: #1967-Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Super / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Super-Type-105 / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Saloon / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Type-105 / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Saloon-Type-105 / #Alfa-Romeo / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Super / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Berlina / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Berlina-Type-105 / #1967 / #1967-Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Super-Type-105

    1967 ALFA ROMEO GIULIA SALOON

    OWNER: EVAN KLEIN

    IT’S 5:43AM. The pounding on the front door is so loud I think the police are about to break through. Leaping from my bed, I shout ‘What?’ ‘It’s Don, your neighbour… FIRE!’

    It’s still dark outside but the hill across the street is filled with orange flames. The neighbours start gathering; I grab my camera and we watch the flames. What do we do?

    Fortunately, the winds are blowing towards the ocean, keeping the flames from moving towards us. One person says they won’t start dropping water with helicopters until sunrise. That’s at 6:48. I run inside and turn on the TV; the other side of the hill is in full flame and they’ve closed the freeway. While my wife starts packing things and throwing them in her car, I grab jeans, shirts and camera stuff and throw it all in the trunk of the Giulia.

    Back outside, we try to assess how quickly the fire is moving and how much time we have. This is Bel Air… surely they’re not going to let it burn! Where are the fire trucks?

    The flames are getting very close to the houses now, and as the sun rises the fire trucks start making their way down our street. Our house shakes as helicopters fly over, but why aren’t they dropping water? My wife says: ‘I’m going to work; let me know what happens.’ I hop in the Giulia and head to the end of the street.

    There are giant plumes of smoke, the flames on the hill are much bigger, and now I can feel the sense of urgency as the helicopters constantly pull water from a local reservoir and unload it at the fire’s leading edge. Four large tanker planes are also dropping retardant to contain it from spreading, while 500 firemen are clearing brush ahead of the fire.

    Police start evacuating the neighbourhood. I ask to stay; they take my name, address and phone number, and comment on how cool they think the Giulia is. They just want to make sure I’m OK.

    It’s amazing how coordinated the effort is. A single aircraft flies in circles at a higher altitude to give directions, so that planes and helicopters don’t collide. Firemen are given instructions and positioned. Meanwhile, homes in the valley are burning.

    At 4:30 the winds shift. The last home on our street has flames feet from its structure. The police are given the order for full evacuation and the fire department says we have less than 30 minutes. I grab the dog and sit her on the Alfa’s front seat. As I run to the driver’s seat, memories of cracked radiators, bad distributors and faulty alternators fill my head. I stare at the ignition key. Please, dear Alfa, all I ask is that you start. I put the key in, pump the pedal, and with a twist she starts. I look at the dog, she looks at me, and we’re off.

    I drive between the 15 police cars stationed at the end of our street and head to another hill to watch the fire. When it gets dark, I drive back to my street, and the police recognise my car. I keep it running. As I talk with the officers, they tell me that windblown embers are now their biggest concern, because they can start fires again randomly. I feel relieved that we live next to a fire hydrant.

    Next day, after spending the night with friends, I return. I feel proud: the Giulia hasn’t let me down, and at one point I come outside to see a group of firemen taking pictures of it. You don’t realise what’s important until you’re forced to decide. If this happened again, would I do anything different? Not at all. I’m just glad I only have one Alfa – otherwise I’d have to make a choice.

    Clockwise from facing page, top This was the view from the end of Evan’s street; Alfa about to become a getaway car; aircraft and helicopters fight the fire.
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  •   Evan Klein reacted to this post about 2 years ago
    Mark Sommer updated the cover photo of the group
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  •   Quentin Willson reacted to this post about 3 years ago
    On the home straight

    / #1968 / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Saloon / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Type-105 / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Saloon-Type-105 / #Alfa-Romeo /

    Mark Sommer / Photo by MASSIMO DELBÒ

    It’s not long now until Mark Dixon and I fly over to Italy to pick up the Giulia, but in the meantime there are a few things left to do before the Alfa Romeo is ready to collect.

    I recently sent a brand-new bootrubber set, original radio blanking plate and a few other small parts over to Italy. Most spares are easy to source thanks to specialists such as Classic Alfa and Alfaholics, who are both based in the UK, as well as many others. Drive-My’s ever-helpful Italian contributor, Massimo Delbò, visited the bodyshop and gave me an update on how the work was going. The guys there decided to fit the boot mat on top of a shaped section of hardboard to protect the fresh paint underneath – something that was not done originally, and meant that the rubber mat would often start to split above the floor pressings when luggage was placed on top.

    They had also unearthed a motorised screen-washer bag, but I’d bought a new manual foot pump and I think I’ll stick with this original for now – for the novelty value, if nothing else. Unfortunately my blanking plate was a little too small to conceal the cut-out made for the previous radio, but Fabio at the bodyshop is confident that he can create a matching lip to sit behind the plate. Meanwhile, the round mirrors that I bought for the car offer little visibility on the passenger side, so I have decided to go back to the original oval-style units, as they provide much better all-round vision. I had been struggling to find some stainless steel weather strips for my car. These sit at the bottom of the front and rear side windows, and mine are a little the worse for wear – but after contacting nearly every Alfa specialist in the UK, Europe, US and Canada, I had drawn a blank.

    I was beginning to despair, until I received an email from James Wheeler, the former Alfa Romeo specialist who was based at Black & White Garage. James has now sold the site and the business no longer exists, but he remains an Alfa devotee. He was extremely complimentary about my choice of classic, being the owner of a 1969 Giulia Super himself.

    He offered his advice and support should I need it, and his kind gesture couldn’t have come at a better time, because he thought he might have a near-complete set of weather strips left over from a former project. Sure enough, a week later he delivered them to the Drive-My office. The felt that sits inside the metal strips has been remanufactured, so was easy to source, and the result should be a big improvement on my existing set.
    Now, with our flights to Milan booked for the end of April, the next step for Mark and I is to work out the logistics of our trip and plan our route home. I think we will take our time and use the backroads wherever we can. One way or another, you’ll be able to read all about our adventure in an upcoming issue of Drive-My.

    Above. Looking good: the Alfa is on schedule to be collected from the Italian bodyshop in late April and driven back to the UK.
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  • Mark Sommer created this group

    Alfa-Romeo Giulia Type-105

    Alfa-Romeo Giulia Type-105 1962 - 1978
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