Introduction
Photo Albums
No photos available
No photos available
No photos available
Pinned Items
Recent Activities
  •   Andy Everett reacted to this post about 7 months ago
    / #Porsche-911-Turbo / #Porsche-911-Turbo-992 / #Porsche-911-992 / #Porsche-911 / #Porsche-992 / #2021-Porsche-911-Turbo / #2021 / #Porsche

    Let’s get one thing straight – the 992 911 is annoyingly good. Like, beyond excellent, and that’s just the Carreras. We’ve not yet seen, let alone driven, a Turbo, GT3 or, god willing, a GT2 RS. That will change this year when we bolt ourselves into the 700bhp Turbo 992. Expectations high.
    Post is under moderation
    Stream item published successfully. Item will now be visible on your stream.
  • Mark Williams is now friends with C Gooch
    Post is under moderation
    Stream item published successfully. Item will now be visible on your stream.
  • Mark Williams is now following C Gooch
    Post is under moderation
    Stream item published successfully. Item will now be visible on your stream.
  • Mark Williams is now following Jethro Bovingdon
    Post is under moderation
    Stream item published successfully. Item will now be visible on your stream.
  •   Glen Waddington reacted to this post about 1 year ago
    MARK B’S #BMW-E30 / #BMW-M3 / #BMW-M3-E30 / #BMW-3-Series / #BMW-3-Series-E30 / #BMW

    Well it’s been a busy month or so and I’m pleased to be able to say that all remains well with my E30 M3. In fact, a recent trip up to Silverstone for the Pistonheads Sunday Service saw me cover nigh-on 550 miles in one day.

    The only real drawback with living here in Cornwall is everything else is just so bloody far away! Oh and that we don’t have a race circuit, although once my lottery millions roll in I plan to remedy that situation with a mini Nürburgring! I simply need to win the lottery first! Anyway, I had never driven Silverstone before, but the Pistonheads event had 30 minute sessions available for just £40, so I figured it was worth the trip. As well as a chance to get out on track there is usually a good mix of cars there to drool over and there was even a bit of sun forecast to make an appearance. I also knew that Sam Ratcliffe was due to be there in his stunning E46 M3 track car, which is just about my perfect specification. Added to which he can pedal a bit and who doesn’t like seeing an M3 getting used properly on track? In fact, look up DannyDC2 on YouTube and you can see both Sam and Dan driving their M3s back at Silverstone a week or so later.

    Anyway, the trip up in the E30 went without incident, although it has to be said that the Nankang AR-1 tyres aren’t exactly ideal on a cold autumn morning. I did consider swapping over to my spare wheels that wear an all-weather Toyo TR1, but as the forecast was for dry and bright weather I figured it best to stay with the Nankang and just be a bit more careful driving up. Once I was within a few miles of Silverstone I soon began to spot other cars heading to the same event. I ended up in convoy with a pair of serious-looking Caterhams, a stunning blue 911 GT3 and a Clio Sport. It reminded me just how useful a roof and windscreen are as the Caterham looked a bit of a chilly and damp place to be thanks to the early morning drizzle.

    Once we reached the circuit I was directed to the pit garages, while the rest of the convoy went into the main car park and joined the rest of the event. There were so many great cars there and a few rarities, such as the Renault 5 Turbo 2 and a pair of Nobles. There were several of the usual suspects that you see at track days, such as a 911 GT3 RS and the later incarnations of the M3 and M5, with a lovely track-prepared E34 M5 being a favourite of mine. The drizzle had stopped but the track was still pretty wet and there was certainly no visible dry line. Sadly one unlucky M3 owner had a pretty big off and wiped out the front of his car in a big way. Fortunately he wasn’t hurt, though, and an initial inspection suggested his M3 wasn’t beyond repair. It was still a sobering reminder of how quickly things can go wrong if you push a little too hard or get caught unaware by changing track conditions.

    The time for my sessions soon rolled around and I lined up in the pit lane behind a lovely-looking Noble. The track had been drying out but there were still lots of wet patches to look out for and I knew my tyres needed a bit of heat before they’d have any real grip. There was also the added factor that my only experience of Silverstone was driving it at home on the PS4 and Project Cars, where spinning out in a Group A E30 M3 doesn’t matter. I opted to try and stay to the right (letting the faster cars past with a cursory flick of the indicators to confirm my intentions) and simply enjoy being on such a historic track and being able to really stretch the E30’s legs. One of the many things I love about the E30 M3 is just how communicative the chassis is. It’s just so easy to feel exactly what the car is doing beneath you and the feedback through the steering means that even clumsy amateurs like myself can make a reasonable job of putting a respectable lap in. The more laps I did, the drier the racing line got and the more my confidence grew. The only downside was that the KW Competition suspension I run is just a bit too firm for wet conditions. Ideally you want a bit of body roll, so the weight shifts and pushes the tyre contact patch into the tarmac, so I could have disconnected the ARB if I’d had more time, but it was still great fun all the same and reminded me just how capable the E30 M3 really is out on track. I had a couple of moments going into the faster corners where the inside rear caught the wet outer edge of the track and lost grip but it just made me more determined to go back once spring gets here next year.

    The drive home (after checking the engine oil, coolant, tyre pressures etc.) was just as uneventful as the drive up. I always enjoy seeing people react to spotting a track prep’d E30 M3 go past amongst a sea of modern Euro boxes, though. The engine has been great and, even out on track, the oil and coolant temperatures stayed perfectly constant, as did the oil pressure. I’m off to Mallory Park in late November so will need to change the oil and filter before then and have Joe at ARM BMW do a spanner check. I also plan on fitting some new brake pads from Pagid and fitting a vinyl sun strip on the windscreen now that the winter sun is so much lower, as the cage stops the OE sun visors from being used. I’m also thinking of getting Apex to supply a set of their stunning dished ARC-8 alloys.

    THANKS Joe @ ARM as ever Pistonheads Sunday Service Silverstone Circuit Nankang UK Apex

    BMW E30 M3 felt at home around Silverstone.
    Post is under moderation
    Stream item published successfully. Item will now be visible on your stream.
  •   Glen Waddington reacted to this post about 2 years ago
    MARK B’S #BMW-E30-Coupe / #BMW-M3 / #BMW-E30 / #BMW-M3-E30 / #BMW / #BMW-S14

    Since rebuilding the engine a few months back, I have tried to use the M3 whenever I can and it finally has the reliability it should have had. The engine performance is really strong and using the M3 in competition meant I was able to really drive it harder than regular driving allows. I kept the rev limit to just over 8000rpm for longevity and while 250hp isn’t much by modern M3 standards, combined with a shorter final drive and the low weight of a partially-stripped #BMW-E30 , you have a car that’s quicker than you might imagine. The combination of induction noise (thanks to the DTM carbon air box) and harder edged exhaust tone (from Eisenmann’s excellent Race exhaust system) only add to the experience. Whilst I always loved the look of the old ex-works race car clocks, they just didn’t allow me to keep close enough an eye on what was going on within the engine, which is why STACK suggested I run their classic analogue rev counter and LCD display. I must say, I am glad I followed their advice as having literally every parameter covered and the information available at my finger tips has meant I have total confidence in the BMW-S14 and its health. I can’t say it hasn’t been a pretty steep learning curve, especially when it comes down to learning which modifications work and which don’t, but I’m finally at a point where everything has come together. The additional cooling (thanks Rad-Tec) and tricks like remounting the oil cooler (albeit a slightly larger Mocal unit) mean the engine now runs at its optimum with power and performance being consistent no matter ambient temperature and altitude, thanks to running DTA Fast engine management. This wasn’t the case with Alpha-N, when the car could feel totally different from one day to the next. It just seemed incredibly sensitive to changes and I’m sure that wasn’t good for the engine. Thankfully that’s all in the past now.

    This past week saw MOT time roll around again (where does the time go?!). Thankfully ARM take care of this for me and as I know there’s no corrosion to worry about, plus the mechanical side is about as well maintained as it’s possible to be, I really didn’t have too many concerns. Usually it’s something trivial like the headlight adjustment or a blown bulb but this time it was a straight pass with no advisories. Job done! We also did a gearbox and LSD oil change as I plan on doing a track session at Silverstone at the end of November. I’ve never driven Silverstone before, apart from in Project Cars on the PS4, so I’m really looking forward to driving such an iconic track. The video from Petrolicious is also live now and I must say thank you for the positive comments. It’s been a tough few years if I’m honest and I have some more tough times ahead, so I’m extremely grateful. Sadly this may mean my selling the E30, although I am currently trying to find an alternative solution, but please feel free to contact me should you be interested.

    Mark’s awesome M3 in action
    Post is under moderation
    Stream item published successfully. Item will now be visible on your stream.
  •   Guy Baker reacted to this post about 2 years ago
    F10 520d SE LONGTERMERS / #Jaguar / #BMW

    How much more fuel do you suppose is consumed through running your heated seats on full blast all the time? The recent colder weather has meant that the Five Series has driven around west Oxfordshire for nearly a month with heated seats and steering wheel on full roast, and I think the resultant 37.6 is the lowest average figure I’ve seen since we bought the car. The only reason the overall economy is actually 39.1mpg is due to a lastminute return day trip to Sudbury the day before I submitted this copy to the editor, which has had the effect of dragging up the average a tad.

    Full anorak-spec this observation may be, but a ten percent difference in terms of inferior economy (or thereabouts) is a marked drop. I doubt there’s another reason for it, and next weekend we’re off to North Wales again for our annual freezing-our-bits-off- because-we-have-children shindig at Betws-y-Coed (there’s a Winter Wonderland there every year), and given that I like to travel in a toasty oven these days, and especially at this time of year, it’ll be mildly interesting to see what kind of economy we get.

    Enough maths though, what else have we been up to? Well I’ve driven a Jaguar, around a year after I said no to the last one. That car was the XE, which turned out to be too small, not special enough inside and despite the 3 Series-esque road manners, not quite what I was looking for. Shock horror of course, because I ended up buying a Five Series. Ergo trying the XE really wasn’t giving Jaguar a fair chance. The XF would have been a far more suitable foe, ignoring for a moment the alluring finance deals which supported XE sales at the time.

    Without boring you with the logistics, I was able to spend some quality time with the XF, the idea being (risky I know) to ascertain whether or not it would indeed have been a better fit. And the short answer? No.

    On castor-spec 17-inch alloys it looks too bloated, the rear deck especially sitting very heavily over the wheels. Square-on from the rear, there’s a distinct muffin effect, too (i.e a narrow track). The F10 runs equal diameter rims of course (at least it does at the moment) but the styling is better resolved, possibly through being a more traditional three-box shape.

    The XF’s frontal aspect is spot on though. It’s as you walk around the car that is starts to unravel.

    So you climb inside, and this is where a Jaguar is supposed to excel, right? No again I’m afraid. The days of the low-slung and snug, highdashboard, hide and wood Jaguar interiors which I used to own back in the day have long gone. No bad thing some would say, but the honest truth in my view is that, compared to the driver-centric and well-finished premium feel to the BMW’s interior, the open-architecture fascia was in stark contrast to the BMW and for the wrong reasons. Firstly because this is the latest iteration of the #Jaguar-XF – not an update of the previous model, but a whole new version. Hence you would expect it to match the F10, at least.

    When the G30 goes on general sale in the UK in February, it’s going to date the Jaguar’s interior something chronic (plus the tech in the Jaguar isn’t too hot either, but we’ll get to that). And secondly because the interior in general, with thin and brittle-feeling paddle-shifters, ditto the electronic parking brake actuator and even more thin, brittle and poor-quality seat height adjustment, plus an impressive looking aluminium rising rotary gear selector which unfortunately then sits in a sea of plastic, felt quite inferior to the #BMW interior. And let’s not forget, this is where you spend most of your car time.

    If this sounds quite harsh then it’s fair to also point out that the car did grow on me a little during the two days we had it, but nowhere near enough to be convinced by it. And I’m also acutely aware that I do like a bit of ‘wood’ trim in my cars. The standard BMW trim is also pretty awful in my view (and the metallic-look plastic in the M-Sport offerings is even worse) but it’s at least underpinned by some better thought-out design. Who, for example, decided to locate the driver assistance buttons in the XF down on the lower right-hand side of the dashboard by the driver’s knee, where they are almost completely out of sight and difficult to spot without considerable determination whilst on the move? And when you do activate the system, the tell-tale icon in the instrument cluster is apologetically small. Driver assistance? Hardly. In terms of overall tech, BMW wins again. Not in the availability of tech, as the Jaguar also offers up lane guidance, radar cruise, cameras and so on, but in how the tech is deployed. The iDrive pro-nav in the Five Series, as I’ve said before, is a fantastic piece of kit. As is the HUD. The Jaguar offerings however, lag behind. The touch-screen interface lacks appeal, the graphics are outmoded and the presence of a memory card for the nav’s maps in the armrest had me mentally winding the clock back ten years.

    Jaguar sold a little over 80k cars in 2015 (contributing around 20 percent to the overall JLR sales figures once the approximately 400k annual Land Rover sales are taken into account). BMW shifted 1.9 million. So naturally there’s a monumental investment hole. One does wonder how the gap will be closed on this evidence. In terms of the drive, bearing in mind I’d already been underwhelmed by the looks and the interior, the abrupt quality to the auto shift (which is the same ZF unit I believe, albeit with Jaguar-specific calibration) no matter the drive mode selected at the time, was the final nail in the coffin.

    The XE did this too and I didn’t like it then, either. Ride quality was excellent though, wind and road noise well-suppressed, and the rotating air vents are amusing pieces of theatre (even if the central vents are now bog-standard items on this latest version). These positives weren’t enough to tip the balance however. So no, I didn’t fancy it, and the F10 is definitely the better car, at least from my perspective. There’s a video review of the XF on my YouTube channel. And I’ll apologise in advance for the hat…

    TECHNICAL #BMW-F10 / #BMW-520d-SE / #BMW-520d-SE-F10 / #BMW-520d-F10 / #BMW-5-Series / #BMW-5-Series-F10
    YEAR: #2016
    MILEAGE THIS MONTH: 1319
    TOTAL MILEAGE: 11,878
    MPG THIS MONTH: 39.1
    COST THIS MONTH: Nil
    Post is under moderation
    Stream item published successfully. Item will now be visible on your stream.
  •   Guy Baker reacted to this post about 2 years ago
    F10 520d SE

    I knew I was going too fast as the nose of the M4 approached the apex. I was going to run out of track. In a heartbeat, cutting the corner a little more seemed the sensible thing to do. Severe of kerb and blind on the approach, I’ve driven this track enough to know what lay beyond, but even so in that moment I wasn’t sure quite how much road I would have left if this went wrong.

    In the next breath, I knew I’d misjudged it. The front rode the kerb well enough without displacing the chassis more than expected, but then a thousandth of a second later, the rear hit the kerb right at its most extreme and rather than enjoying that balanced feel of front and rear in unison, just on the edge and peeking over the point of no return, it all started to unravel with the rear of the car rotating into the air, the force through the steering wheel increasing, the windscreen full of trees and not the corner which I’d just been looking at, and with said bend now coming at us through the passenger window…

    Those of a certain age and a gaming inclination will recall the earliest days of the driving sim, and those halcyon days of the mid-‘90s, by when the earliest games (impressive but hampered by the limitations of the hardware) had evolved into something more realistic with the dawn of the modern console era, are the starting point of the evolutionary process which has brought us to where we are today.

    The likes of TOCA Touring Cars and Colin McRae Rally, plus of course Gran Turismo and later, the Microsoft Forza series laid the ingredients for the successful formula, and today’s iterations are something to behold. Virtual Reality is the latest thing in gaming. But if you’re like me, you’ll feel that sitting in a room wearing a headset and headphones which isolate you from the surrounding environment (not to mention looking like a dork) is a tad anti-social. I like to be aware of what’s around me, hence I stick to the 32-inch monitor. But games tell you they offer a realistic interpretation of the art of driving so is there any truth in that, or is it a load of tyre smoke and mirrors?

    The first thing to understand, whilst I’m hacking around the Nordschleife in my virtual BMW M4 (that wasn’t an actual #BMW-M4-Coupe-F82 I was referring to at the start, do you think #BMW had taken leave of its senses!?), is I’m not sat in one of these gaming rigs which wouldn’t look out of place in McLaren F1’s R&D studio. Some people do spend thousands on these setups, but for that kind of cash I’d rather buy an actual car and do some track days. But at the same time, I’m not sat there on a cardboard box twirling a plastic plate, so some cash has been spent beyond the presence of a sturdy, reclining office leather chair…

    We have a force feedback base by Thrustmaster, a TX to be precise at about 200 quid, to which is attached a 22-inch TM racing rim. Leather covered and equipped with tactile metal paddles and a solid metal centre, this adds weight and realism through avoiding feeling too plasticky or ‘light’ in your hands. And another 100 quid. Next, my feet drop onto the cool metal plate of my inverted #T3PAPRO pedals, offering up full threepedal heel-n-toe control and a socalled canonical brake pedal mod, which allows proper resistance to be felt underfoot and hence, the judging of braking effort up to the point of lockup. Thrustmaster will relieve you of £150 for those.

    The last item of what I consider the essential equipment without resorting to one of those rigs (and discounting the obvious requirement for a decent television or monitor, in my case a 32- inch HD 1080p LG bought used off eBay for 50 notes) is the TH8A shifter, again by Thrustmaster, and again fostering realism through allowing full manual gear changes when combined with the aforementioned pedal set.

    Seven-speed capable, cool to the touch at least at the start of a gaming session and with an exposed gate, it’s a beautifully tactile addition and really sets the rest of the kit off a treat. And another 120 quid or so.

    The total cost is somewhere around £570, to which we need to add around 50 quid for a decent set of headphones. With other sundries, we’re at 600 quid before factoring in the cost of the actual console. Xbox One bought new upon release, we’re at nearly a grand for the whole lot. Barmy, but still less than the £3.5k and up for one of those rigs. So, in short, it’d better be worth it…

    Back to the Hohe Acht turn-in around the latter half of the ‘Ring (on a rise, blind entry, falling camber on the exit, the fella who drew this place had a really sick sense of humour). I’d gone in far too fast, clipped the kerbs and immediately sent the inside rear into the air… Travelling too quickly on increasing opposite lock and with the outside wheel scrubbing the surface, lifting off now would spell disaster. Split-second analysis of the decision (hindsight is a wonderful thing) resulted in a little more power being deployed, and in a nanosecond we’re broadside on the track as the inside rear regains its useless purchase on the Tarmac. And Wippermann is now looming in the side windows. Hmm…

    At least it’s a right-hander, just about. As was the last corner, so we’re heading in vaguely the right direction. What to do? Drop anchor and hope enough speed is lost before the passenger side smashes into the Armco, or try to drive out of it? How to even try to drive out of it? Figuring that if this goes pear-shaped all I’ll lose is my pride and I won’t actually die, I work the situation. Modulating the power (coughs and crackles audible from the exhaust) but fighting the steering all the time, I twirl the wheel with such force my bottle of (thankfully, unopened) Dr Pepper falls off the table whilst I whoop far too loudly. The outside kerb of Wippermann is almost upon us but a combination of lost speed, reduced torque and a shallower steering angle scamper us around in a manner which almost implies pre-planning. My heart-rate says different. My wife looks up briefly from what she’s doing, shakes her head in amusement at my “THIS IS AWESOME” exclamation and returns to her task.

    The M4, with not a mark anywhere on it, continues on its way up the road. The next lap (still with the tyre marks showing on the surface through Hohe Acht – a nice touch) is a good deal less eventful and by the end of the second lap, the tyres are shot and we need fuel too. But my mind tells me that was epic and a very realistic modelling of an M4’s behaviour in extremis.

    But all this is supposition unless one has some actual real-world experience of the Nordschleife, not to mention your chosen wheels. So what are my credentials? An E46 320d which was collected new as a company car in Brussels years ago, and handed back two years later with 100km on the clock and decidedly second hand, gave me a few tastes of life around the ‘Ring. White-knuckled runs (bearing in mind company cars weren’t allowed to do such things if one listened to HR) and some interesting tussles with a muppet in an Opel Manta convinced me to get out whilst the going was good. So after four or five visits over a 12 month period, never once visiting the Armco, witnessing the increasing madness of some people and stringing together a circa ten-minute lap (in an E46 #BMW-320d-E46 , don’t forget) I declared the place ticked off my bucket list and haven’t been back since.

    Not physically anyway. But the number of virtual miles I’ve completed around that track would likely run into thousands, and it’s now gotten to the point that I can replay a lap in my head, every corner entry point, clipping point and track position on the exit logged in my brain on a virtual, rotating 3D image of the place. Whether that ever translates into a decent actual lap, I’m not sure I want to try and find out.

    And the M4? Well okay there’s some artistic licence at play here because I’ve not actually driven an #BMW-M4 as yet (and if anybody from BMW is reading this, I’d be more than happy to remedy the situation, and we don’t even have to go to the Nordschleife either). But time spent in an F80 M3 last year represents the next best thing, and whilst the ‘Ring wasn’t the stage for that experience, the noise, the feel and response and the gusto in evidence during the miles I drove the car on the public roads have stuck in my mind.

    I can therefore declare that Assetto Corsa, the game in question, is very realistic. Sound-wise, the game is spot on. Oh I know the M3 and M4 pairing have received a load of stick in the press for not sounding as good as the E90 generation, but that’s like criticising the Euro Fighter for not sounding quite as evil as the Vulcan bomber. Doesn’t mean it’s any less capable of ruining your day should the need arise.

    So the virtual M4 sounds pretty good, at least in terms of matching the real version. The creators have even successfully managed to model the interior, although as usual the lack of a HUD frustrates (other cars in the game get one). As for the handling, the one thing the game doesn’t model is weather beyond a little mist or fog, so the M4’s supposed spiky handling on the limit in damp conditions can’t be explored (a pity, one may have been able to learn to a certain extent, and in controlled conditions, how to drive around it).

    We can still comment on the dry handling though. So get the chassis loaded-up in a turn, now adjust the balance with a little more throttle, feel the rear start to slip. No need for corrective lock, at this point the rear is turning the car with the fronts pointing at zero degrees. Hold this attitude for as long as the corner lasts and the M4 arcs around gracefully; a mournful wail from the tyres filling your world. Allow some more power and the feeling of balance remains (remembering we are using a force feedback wheel, which accurately mimics steering and chassis loading, even if the fixed seat doesn’t) whilst the rear now slides out a little. This is where the simulation really starts to tell. One has to know exactly how much corrective lock to apply. Too little and the car will slide further outwards until it runs out of road and you crash into the barriers on the inside of the turn. Too much and the slide ends abruptly. From there it’s almost inevitable that you’ll nose it at speed into the opposite barriers on the outside of the turn. Get it wrong and you’ll tut-tut, press restart and try over. Get it right and you’re convinced you’ll never get it wrong, and you’re off to try it again at the next corner…

    Perhaps you can’t afford an M3. Or an M4. Or a 1M which is also modelled in the game and unnervingly accurate with its wailing straight-six and spin-in-its-own-length handling. I know I can’t. So for many, the possibilities offered up by a good driving sim are intriguing, and if you’ve not tried it, I urge you to do so.

    As for the 520d, no I wouldn’t dare attempt to take this one around the ‘Ring because it’s my own car! We’ve been to North Wales again this month though, and hacking across country from Shrewsbury and then out into the sticks up the A5 with the heated seats and wheels going full blast and -3°C outside (it was -7°C the following morning!), plus some decent toons on the hi-fi was a very pleasurable experience. I’ve said before that travelling at night in the F10 is a very pleasurable way of putting distance behind you and that doesn’t change with familiarity. One assumes the same sense of well-being will be evident in the G30 when it arrives. We spent a pleasant couple of days in Betws-y-Coed, nosing around the local shops and generally having a good time, and I spent far too much money in the model railway place.

    Again. Then the time came to leave and as night approached we scampered south back along the A5, the sun setting rapidly to our right as night crept over the hills, turning the landscape from green, through husky greys to darker browns before blackness and night enveloped us silently. Mercifully free of traffic, and hence cracking on whenever I had the chance, we made good time on the return trip and the nigh-on 40mpg returned by the B47 despite the aforementioned heated occupants proves that modern engines, for all their efficiency and as I alluded to last month, are better with more demanding usage than just crawling around town.

    CAR: #BMW-F10 / #BMW-520d-SE / #BMW-520d-SE-F10 / #BMW-520d-F10 / #BMW /

    YEAR: #2016
    MILEAGE THIS MONTH: 897
    TOTAL MILEAGE: 12,775
    MPG THIS MONTH: 39.6
    COST THIS MONTH: Nil
    Post is under moderation
    Stream item published successfully. Item will now be visible on your stream.
  •   Guy Baker reacted to this post about 2 years ago
    LONGTERMERS #BMW-F10 / #BMW-520d-SE / #BMW-520d / #BMW-520d-F10 / #BMW / #BMW-5-Series / #BMW-5-Series-F10
    CAR: BMW-F10 / BMW-520d SE /
    YEAR: #2016
    TOTAL MILEAGE: 20,149
    MILEAGE THIS MONTH: 972
    MPG THIS MONTH: 39.2
    TOTAL COST: nil

    Fate has played a hand in my story this month. The other day I was ruefully thinking how it was going to be yet another ‘quiet month’ for OU16, and then a rock came sailing over a fence, hit my car, and all that changed. My daughter attends an afterschool club and it was while I was collecting her from there that the trouble started. The car park is next to a sports field, but separated from it buy a high, solid fence.
    Evidently, what had happened was that one of the ‘sportsmen’ on the other side had found the lump of stone in the grass and thought the simplest thing to do was to lob it over the fence.

    The trouble was, of course, that they’d obviously not thought about what or who might be on the other side – or, worse still, didn’t care. I was sitting in the car as my wife and daughter approached, and was about to start the engine when, ’crack!’, the stone landed out of the blue, literally.

    The loudness of the impact certainly gave me a shock; it was like close-proximity gunfire. My first thought was for my wife and daughter so I jumped out of the car to check on them but, thankfully, they were both fi ne. Initially a little confused, I then spotted the rock on the ground and the damaged windscreen.
    Now, as much as I like my car, it is insured and repairable. What a different story it would have been had the rock hit a person. As I write this, Autoglass is booked in to visit and, for a 75 quid excess, will fit a new windscreen.
    Needless to say, ‘nobody saw nuffink, guvna’ when I went round into the sports field to investigate. Even though I could tell by the body language of some of the youths that they knew full well what had happened, nobody was prepared to own up and take responsibility.

    I’ve had no luck taking the matter further, with the authorities responsible for booking the playing field, the police or my local MP. I’m still waiting to hear from the latter but, to be honest, I’m not holding my breath. In many ways, I think I’d rather that it had stayed a quiet month, after all.

    Thrown ‘blind’ from a nearby sports field, this rock could have done some serious damage. ‘Luckily’ it hit my front screen rather than a person. Autoglass is coming to the rescue.
    Post is under moderation
    Stream item published successfully. Item will now be visible on your stream.
  • Mark Williams is now friends with Tanya Lieder
    Post is under moderation
    Stream item published successfully. Item will now be visible on your stream.
There are no activities here yet
Unable to load tooltip content.

Drive-My.COM MEDIA EN/UK based is United Kingdom’s top cars/retro/classic/modern/tuning/moto/commercial news, test drive, classic cars and classifieds. For car advertisement be it an RETRO/CLASSIC/OLD-TIMER/NEW-TIMER, Coupe, MPV, SUV, Luxury Car, Commercial vehicle, OPC car or even an auction car. We update you with latest information on new car prices from both parallel importers and car authorised dealers with brands such as Aston-Martin, Bristol, TVR, Bentley, Ford, Porsche, Jaguar, Land Rover, Citroen, Tesla, DS, Alfa Romeo, Subaru, Toyota, Acura, Honda, Nissan, Audi, Kia, Hyundai, Volkswagen, Volvo, Mitsubishi, BMW, Mercedes-Benz. Find new car pricelists, new car promotions, new car reviews, latest car news, car reviews & car insurance UK. We are also your information hub for parking, road tax, car insurance and car loan, car audio, car performance parts, car discussion, motor insurance, car grooming, car rental, vehicle insurance, car insurance quotation, car accessories, car workshop, & car sticker, tuning, stance and Cars Clubs

Our Drive-My EN/USA site use cookies