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    JAWS 2 Ten years ago we featured this E24 in its original incarnation but now it’s back and meaner than ever. We’re going to need a bigger magazine… Words and photos: Andy ‘Sharkey’ Starkey

    / #JAWS-2 UK air-ride E24 #BMW-635CSi-JAWS-2 / #BMW-635CSi-Highline-E24

    The iconic Spielberg movie, Jaws, put a whole new spin on suspense and horror, and we have never looked back. This movie was responsible for making an entire generation of film fans squeal, hide behind their popcorn and give them involuntary bowel movements. It was such a success and a landmark in cinema history that it spawned several sequels. Now, I have a problem with the whole sequel thing. If you have made something good, I guess it’s a given that you want to continue the success and do it all again.

    That’s all well and good if the subject matter can cope with the return, and if the public want it. The big difficulty for the moviemakers is that we’ve already seen the shark, the villain, the hero or whatever in the first one; we’ve had the shocks, the cheers and the laughs. This usually results in a very loose link to the first instalment which develops into almost the same story but with more blood, scares, laughs, bangs or car chases; all a bit disappointing really.

    There are exceptions of course: Indiana Jones, Jason Bourne, Austin Powers and naturally Mr Bond – all have had continual success with their ongoing escapades and adventures, and that’s all because the key character has what it takes for audiences to keep coming back for more. They all have charisma, attitude and presence, which is exactly what this E24 has in abundance and this too is something of a sequel.

    We think you’ll agree that this particular 6 Series possesses the kind of credentials that any movie icon would give their right arm for. That’s because this #BMW-635CSi-Highline is a continuing story of ownership and development. It even graced the pages of this very magazine some ten years ago and was dubbed ‘Jaws’ by us at the time. For once, this is where a sequel really has paid off, although maybe sequel isn’t the right word, a ‘continuation’ is probably better…

    Way back when, this 635 was owned by a certain Kabir Miah and both he and his brother Lala had a very particular idea for this car in mind. The shark theme was to be played out by having the original paintwork in a two-tone scheme; grey on top graduating into a much paler off-white towards the sills, just like the skin of a shark. The front wings also got the ‘big fish’ look by having a large, striking set of gill slits added. These were not just a stick on adornment, either, these gills were actually pressed through the wings and the finishing touch was the addition of the Jaws number plate.

    That was then, but what about now? To start with, the car now belongs to Lala himself. It may have been Kabir’s car but Lala was the one to make the transformation happen both ten years ago and now. This is wholly because he’s a fully trained painter. In fact he co-owns and runs a Birminghambased styling business, LA Modz, specialising in window tints and wraps, so he’s going to know a thing or two about making cars look good. He still does some bodywork but, as he told me: “Tints and wraps are so much cleaner to work with.”

    As you have probably noticed the, two- tone paint job has gone this time around in favour of clean, bright Nogaro silver with a fabulously deep gloss. The trademark gills and numberplate still identify the car as the original Jaws but now a lovely set of rims highlight the new look.

    Lala does have an eye for detail so the choice of wheel that was to achieve the desired effect had to be right, and boy, are they right. They started out life as a set of M System II Style 21 ‘Throwing Stars’ but they’ve been made into a special set of bespoke three-piece splits by CR Customs in Poland. The guys there have added extra diameter and width, taking them from lowly 17s to a whopping 19”, with the fronts measuring 9.5” wide while the rears are now a massive 11”. The hardware has also been plated in 18ct gold and the wheel nuts had nifty covers made for them from 12 bore shotgun cartridges.


    The interior has been redesigned this time around too; the tired black has now been replaced with luscious terracotta leather. Lala has taken the lead from an M5 he’d seen with a Fox red interior and rather liked the contrast. The style and choice of covering carries on with modified and decluttered doorcards and centre console. The craftsmanship of the interior is something to behold and the stark difference between some of the retained interior scheme and the new is striking. Hats off to Autotrims UK for a sterling job. The whole interior theme has been topped off by the addition of an MTech 2 steering wheel and the all-important shark tooth hanging from the mirror.

    Ten years ago most suspension setups comprised springs and shocks but today air is where it’s at and it’s all about getting your car so low that sometimes you think you could sneak under a snake’s belly wearing a top hat. With its low roof and sleek look, the CSi is the perfect candidate for air and dropping it to the ground accentuates those long, low lines. Lala’s done something very smart here too; sure the air-ride gets the car down low but the clever bit is the use of a specially made M3-style chin spoiler and the fitment of, would you believe, Volvo 850 side skirts.

    These additions make the whole profile look even lower and very sleek. As Lala explains: “The idea with the spoiler was really to give the impression of a shark’s open mouth, but it does lengthen his nose.”

    His nose, did you say? “Definitely,” Lala says. “Jaws was certainly male, so this car must be a bloke too.” Looking at the car now after that statement, you have to agree it does look masculine. It has a sharp, angular feel to it and we’re sure that’s pure testosterone coming out of the exhaust…

    Having a wrap expert on-hand would make you think that this car would be littered with the stuff but on initial scrutiny you’d say there wasn’t any wrapping going on at all. Well, you’d be wrong. Look a little closer and you’ll find something very subtle, but very nicely done: the window surrounds. It may not look much but, while all the glass was out for the paint job, Lala took all the mouldings that fit between the glass and bodywork, and wrapped them in a fabulously deep gloss black wrap. Not only does this look really neat, but you just have to think of how much of a nightmare it must have been to do.

    Externally the look gets further enhancements with the fitment of American side marker lights, smoked headlamps, taillights and badges. The window glass has been replaced with some from a pre-1985 model, purely because the glass had a tasteful bronze tint to it (unlike this 1989 version). This was then made deeper by adding another layer of tint, thus creating a totally unique shade.

    How many times do you feel a tad disappointed when you’ve read all the interesting guff about the fancy bodywork and the trick bits only to be told that the engine has been left totally standard? Well, brace yourself, because this motor is pretty standard too but, before you go all ‘I told you so’ on us, remember one thing, this is a 635CSi which has the lusty 3.4-litre ‘Big Six’ under the bonnet. That’s over 200 feisty ponies in there wanting to get out so – why mess with something that good? Lala has added an induction kit, though, and a bespoke exhaust, making the tuneful straight-six sound even better, from air going in to exhaust gases coming out. To top off the whole package the standard 635 brakes up front have been swapped for the beefier ones from an 840.

    With the subtle changes, bespoke additions and attention to detail, Lala has given us a worthy sequel to his original Jaws, and just when you thought it was safe to go back on the road… This is real proof that sequels can work and work well, providing the main character has what it takes, of course, and this 635 has exactly that.

    “The idea of the chin spoiler was to give the impression of a shark’s open mouth”

    DATA FILE #Air-ride / #BMW-E24 / #BMW-635CSi / #BMW-635CSi-E24 / #BMW-6-Series / #BMW-6-Series-E24 / #M-System / #BMW-E24-Air-ride / #BMW-635CSi-Air-ride / #BMW-635CSi-Air-ride-E24 / #BMW /

    ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION 3.4-litre straight-six #M30B35 / #M30 / #BMW-M30 , induction kit, stainless steel exhaust system, four-speed auto gearbox #ZF-4HP / #ZF

    CHASSIS 9.5x19” (front) and 11x19” (rear) custom three-piece #M5-M-System-II-Style-21 ‘Throwing Stars’ with 3.5” (front) and 4” (rear) polished lips and 18ct gold-plated hardware, 235/35 (front) and 255/30 (rear) tyres, Air Lift Performance air suspension, 840Ci brakes (front)

    EXTERIOR Full respray in BMW Nogaro silver, gloss black wrapped window surrounds, pressed metal gills in front wings, custom E30 M3 chin spoiler, Volvo 850 side skirts, pre-1985 bronze window glass with additional tint, American side marker lights, smoked headlights and tail-lights

    INTERIOR Re-trim in terracotta leather, modified doorcards and centre console, #M-Tech 2 steering wheel, custommounted #AutoPilot-V2 digital air-ride controller, single #ViAir compressor, single air tank, 2x #Pioneer Champion Series 12” subs

    “The idea of the chin spoiler was to give the impression of a shark’s open mouth”

    The craftsmanship of the interior is something to behold…

    “Jaws was certainly male, so this car must be a bloke too”
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    Andy Starkey
    Andy Starkey joined the group BMW E24 Club- 6-series classic
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    RALLY E30 M3 Full-on 320hp Tarmac terror.

    STAGE FRIGHT
    Once a racer, this absolutely awesome 320hp E30 M3 is now a Tarmac rally terror. Having made the transition from racer to rally machine, this E30 M3 is as focused and hardcore as they come. Words and photos: Andy Starkey.

    There’s no air-ride suspension, no handcrafted modified bodywork, no deep lacquered paintwork or fancy hand-stitched leather interior. There’s not even a smart ICE install or a glitzy set of sparkly rims. But this doesn’t stop Allan Davies’ E30 M3 being one hell of a car, one that’s more than worthy of being featured amongst these pages. The reason for the lack of all these pretty bits and bobs is quite obvious: this is a car built to do a job. To do battle on Tarmac rally stages, to be exact. But it wasn’t always that way…

    Way back in 2009 Allan had campaigned a pretty successful season in the Classic Thunder series, driving a 2004 Clio Cup car. However, he yearned to drive something more ‘classic’, preferably rear-wheel drive and with a good deal more poke. The search for such a beast led him to the doors of JC Racing in Yorkshire. There he found this ex-Mark Smith racing E30 M3 nestling amongst all the other treasures. Mark had raced it in the Britcar series and a few 24- hour events but had plans to move up to an E92. Allan, being the charitable type, naturally offered to help out by making a bit more space for Mark by buying the #BMW E30.

    Coming from a company like JC Racing meant that the car was already pretty well sorted. It came equipped with a Russ Cockburn-built #S14 motor which pushed out a useful 320hp. It’s an all-steel affair, high revving and fitted with Works throttle bodies, Works plenum and pretty hot cams. A real peach, as they say. There was a Drenth six-speed ’box and two-way adjustable KW coilover suspension. She was ready to race, straight from JC. Allan enjoyed the next two seasons in the Classic Thunder series again and notched up a couple of wins in the Pre-1993 Championship. He even had a pretty successful trip to Spa.

    There was, however, something of a thought starting to manifest in the back of Allan’s mind. You see, racing wheel-to-wheel on a congested race track certainly makes for exhilarating, heart-pounding action. However, the problem with that is that you can come a proper cropper at the hands of some other adrenalin-fuelled hot-head that reckons he can see a gap when quite clearly there isn’t one. This often results in some rather expensive carnage, and at no fault of your own.

    Now, Allan does have the good fortune to co-own Driveme, a Stafford-based supercar experience business. This means that the E30 has a permanent home and trusted spanner guys to keep it just so. That said, the team has more than enough to do keeping temperamental Ferraris and Lambos going, never mind the possibility of regular panel damage, or worse, to the Beemer from racing it. No, it was time to return to Allan’s roots: rallying. At least that way, if it did get damaged he could only blame himself!


    “There’s no way I’d take her into the woods on a loose event,” Allan assures us. “Tarmac is where it needs to be, and I was sure it wouldn’t take much to get her ready.” Really? Allan is first to admit, he’s a bit mechanically challenged. “In my own little world I thought the transition from race to rally would be fairly simple,” he explains.

    Well, after a bit of research and chatting to people in the know, it became obvious there was a bit more to it than he first thought. You may think that racing and rallying are very close relations and that it can’t be that difficult to hop from one discipline to the other. The trouble is, they both need very different skills and techniques to be competitive. Put a racing driver into a rally car and see how they get on. It’s not as straightforward as you’d think. And that goes for the machinery used, too.

    The E30 was already a superb bit of kit so it was only fair the conversion was entrusted to some people that knew what they were doing, as Allan explains: “It had to be done right. I’d be disappointed with myself if I’d undone JC’s sterling work.”

    Butler Motorsport took on the job of the strip down and eventual rebuild. The engine was the key to Butler’s work. It was already a fine motor but it was built to race. Butler’s Terry Wilson bored and stroked it with Arrow steel rods and forged endurance pistons. The head was specially reworked to give improved low-end torque and a set of Schrick special order cams finished the job. Harry Hockley took the shell into his care where it was media blasted, seam welded and painted. Sump guard mounts were added, as well as additions to the already modern sculpture of a roll cage. Sill stand mounting points were also added.

    Back at Butler, discussions were afoot regarding the transmission. The Drenth six-speed had been great on track but would prove to be ill-suited to twisty #Tarmac stages. A friendly natter with Carl from Tractive Motorsport Transmissions led to the fitment of one of its RD906 six-speed sequential boxes. With his help, a set of ratios have been selected to give a top speed of around 120mph at 8500rpm and a full remap of the S14 would soon make those figures a reality. The tunnel needed further modification to accept this new gearbox, which meant the extra hassle of getting it back to Hockley’s again to have it sorted, but it was worth it. At least the extra time there was utilised to change the fuel tank from a large endurance race one to a smaller capacity bespoke cell which sits low on the boot floor and looks like a real work of art in its own right.


    You’ve heard the term, ‘opening a can of worms’, well that’s an understatement with this build. Hurdles popped up at every turn; time-consuming things like attaching mudflaps, fitting a second seat, and having to design an entirely new wiring loom. The loom in a racer is pretty simple compared with that of a standard car, never mind one needed for a rally car. There were very few creature comforts in the original race version, a simple dash display and rudimentary lighting all made it a bit of a doddle to wire up. Now, though, there were things like the dipped and main beam, spotlights, a trip computer and a Works dashboard to wire up. While we’re on about the dash, it does look the absolute dog’s danglies and sets off a very purposeful looking interior.

    Then there was the reworked fuel system and pumps, along with an accessible fuse box. All in all, quite a headache, and that’s putting it mildly. “I couldn’t believe the stuff that had to be done that just kept cropping up,” Allan explains. “Putting a second wiper back on and needing power steering just added to the adventure.” Apparently the rack was a real pain in the proverbial. It was on and off more times than Casanova’s trousers. It does work now and is just about two turns lock to lock, an absolute must when hustling this beauty around a tricky twisty event. The braking system is pretty much as it was when prepped to race with four-pots, servo assist and adjustable bias control, only now the calipers are home to different, more suitable pad materials. The only other change was a hydraulic handbrake. Apart from the brave muggins that sits in the passenger seat, the hydro handbrake has to be one of the most vital parts to a rally car. Any rally driver worth his salt will rely on a good handbrake to help flick the tail out when the need arises. The KW adjustable coilover suspension remains, except that Allan is still testing different spring rates to achieve the best combination.

    So, what’s next? “The car is just about event ready,” Allan reckons. “There are some new circuit based rallies in an MSV Championship for 2016. These will be a great testing ground as they’ll be at venues we already know, albeit made a lot tighter with added chicanes and in some cases run in the opposite direction.” Well fella, we have to admit, it all sounds a real hoot and the car looks ready for anything. The only thing we would say is, after all the anguish and swearing in getting it sorted, don’t bloody bend it!

    DATA FILE #BMW-E30 / #BMW-M3 / #BMW-M3-E30 / #Rally-Car / #BMW-E30-Rally-Car / #BMW-M3-E30-Rally-Car /

    ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION 2.3-litre four-cylinder #S14B23 / #S14 / #BMW-S14 , steel crank and rods, fully lightened and balanced, gas-flowed cylinder head with special profile #Schrick cams, #Works throttle bodies and plenum, dry sumped, race flywheel, #Tractive-RD906 sequential six-speed dog ’box, competition multi-plate hydraulic clutch, Works LSD

    CHASSIS 8x17” (f&r) #Team-Dynamics forged motorsport wheels with 215/45 (f&r) competition tarmac tyres (wheels and tyres are event dependant), #KW adjustable platform coilovers, four-piston calipers with Pagid RS 4-2 pads (f&r)

    EXTERIOR #BMW-Motorsport E30 M3 shell, fully seam welded, Evo rear spoiler and front bumper, polycarbonate side windows and sliders, #Kaylan-Rally mud-fla ps and MSA regulation towing points

    INTERIOR Fabricated fuel tank in wheel well with twin Facet pumps, full FIA multi-point cage with harness bars, Works Stack and AVO dash and fabricated switch panel, quick release Momo steering wheel with launch button, all lines plumbed inside with brake bias control and FIA regula tion extinguisher system, Corbeau Pro Series seats and five-point harnesses

    E30 M3 rally car looks absolutely awesome on the outside, with some ridiculously cool mud-flaps.

    (Top) Russ Cockburn-built S14 puts out a seriously impressive 320hp; bespoke fuel cell mounted in boot floor with twin Facet pumps.

    It had to be done right. I’d be disappointed myself if I’d undone JC’s sterling work.
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    Andy Starkey
    Andy Starkey joined the group BMW E30 Club
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    Aspi-Rant
    Aspi-Rant is now friends with Andy Starkey
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    Andy Starkey
    Andy Starkey unlocked the badge Reviewer
    Reviewer
    Reviews blog posts that is created on the site.
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    JAG XJ-6 CUSTOM / #1970 survivor inspired by #Broadspeed / #Jaguar-XJ6-Series-1 / #Jaguar-XJ-Series-1 / #Jaguar-XJ6 / #Jaguar-XJ6 / #Jaguar /

    JAGUAR XJ6
    His dad offered him his old Jag and he said no. Then he saw sense
    PERIOD DRAMA WORDS & PHOTOGRAPHY Andy Starkey
    Don Lewthwaite’s Dad had to persuade him to accept this Jag as a free gift. Luckily he got his act together soon afterwards.

    ‘THE NOISE OF THREE WEBERS AND THE CUSTOM EXHAUST STIRS THE SOUL’

    How can you tell when you’re getting old? There are certain signs. For instance, you ask everyone to be quiet when the News is on telly, Gloria Hunniford starts to look increasingly fanciable and you think those slippers look ever so comfy. Now, there are certain cars that look as if they have been specifically designed for the older generation. Estate cars seem to be one of them, along with large lumbering saloons like a Rover 75, a Volvo 740 or a series 1 XJ6. Don Lewthwaite felt the same at one time.

    Back in 1973 this particular #Jaguar-XJ6 was bought brand new by Don’s Dad. He ran it for the next few years and then decided to upgrade to a newer model. He was so dismayed at the tiny bag of beans of trade in value that he refused to sell it back to the dealer.

    Instead, it was offered to Don – free! Now Don really didn’t see the appeal of this car and he wasn’t particularly keen on taking on the ownership. Not until his Dad agreed to let him do what he liked with it. Ah, now that makes it a lot more interesting. Back in 1978 when Don took over as legal guardian of the Jag, customising cars was getting pretty big in the UK, thanks to influences from America. Metal flake paints, polished wheels with fat tyres, airbrushed flames and sidepipes were all becoming more common on our streets. Thankfully Don wasn’t quite into the full on American taste, (or should I say lack of it)?

    Don had some appreciation of Dad’s Jag, and he knew that this car could easily have been spoiled if he’d gone totally Yankey Doodle with it. He did however, still have some big ideas. The bodywork saw a huge commitment in time and effort for Don and a coach building friend. They painstakingly produced bespoke arches with a combination of steel rods and sheet metal. Taking hours upon hours to perfect the shapes and ensure they matched perfectly. The original idea of adapting a set of Big Cat style glass arches would’ve been so much easier but, wouldn’t have looked as good that’s for sure. The body was then treated to more than a few coats of #British-Racing-Green . I think 17 was mentioned somewhere in our discussions. However many it was, it was certainly enough because it’s not been repainted since. A grille from a V12 helps complete the look.

    The flared arches weren’t just for looks, Don wanted the true American Custom look with a set of 15inch Cobra Superslots fitted with the customary huge Pos- A-Traction, General Grabber type of tyres.


    You might be wondering then, how come they’re not on the car in the pictures. Simply, the tyres aren’t made in the required size anymore. This did lead to some difficulties for a while as the only tyres to come close were off roaders. ‘Not only did they look daft but, the noise was intolerable’ Don explains. ‘I had to bite the bullet and get a new set of wheels’. In typical fashion for Don, they are both gorgeous and very expensive. ‘Took a bloody year to save up for these’, he says. ‘Nice though aren’t they’? Oh yes matey, nice doesn’t really cover it. 18 inch custom split rims from Image Wheels. They keep the Cobra look but are now shod in a much more practical and modern profile. They certainly help to give the Jag a more up to date stance and look.

    The engine of an XJ6 is almost as famous as a Rolls Royce Merlin. The straight six 4.2 has been the mainstay of so many Jags throughout the years. Don of course wanted to improve things. He’d seen a photo taken under the bonnet of a racing Jag and was besotted with the layout. So, the seed was sewn to replicate not just the looks, but some of the power too. A 4.2 from an XK was sourced and although it came equipped with an injection system this was ditched in favour of three Weber 45 DCOE carbs. The engine received a full on race quality build with a lightened and balanced bottom end, forged pistons and a gas flowed, big valve head and higher lift injection cams.

    All this was beautifully assembled with the help of a Mr Rob Beere, a man well known for his Jag engines. An absolutely gorgeous sculpture in stainless steel is the 6-to-3-to-2 exhaust manifold that finishes one of the most fantastic engine bays I’ve ever seen. It curves elegantly down and under the bulkhead where it meets up with even more bespoke stainless in the form of one off exhaust system. The mixture of the noise of the three Webers gulping at the atmosphere coupled with a muted roar from the twin tail pipes is simply awesome. It’s not shouty and angry, it kind of just lets you know that it’s there and willing to use its 300 plus horses at a moment’s notice. In fact that’s how the whole car presents itself. It’s no shrinking violet but, it’s not some loud, coarse, in your face hot rod either. The modifications have a subtlety about them and retain the very British essence of the car.

    The interior continues in the same way. A cursory glance would lead to think that nothing has really changed. The dash is festooned with the usual Smiths dials surrounded in a wood veneer. But have another look at those front seats. They’re actually Recaros that have been re-covered in a leather to match the interior. Even the original T handle gear shift helps disguise the fact that the Borg Warner 65 auto box it’s attached to is reworked and with a locking torque converter. All of which helps get the power sent reliably through to the XJS Power-Lok differential.

    Suspension wise too has had the subtle but proper attention spent on it. There’s no sign of a custom car, arse in the air, jack up job here. Oh no, the layout remains as intended but, now benefits from adjustable Gaz shocks all round and all the spongy rubbery bits have been replaced with Superflex versions. The whole thing offers a great combination of ride quality and control. Stopping this beauty has been left to the already hefty standard braking system. For good measure the original servo remains in place.

    Now, there is one aspect of this build that may not sit well with everyone, the roof! As you can see there is a matching pair of tilting glass sunroofs. Could it be that these additions spoil things? I’m sure that some people could clutch their chest with anxiety on seeing them but they’re not a huge shock to me. You see, that style of sunroof was from way back then, just the same as the car itself. And in keeping with customising tradition of the time, why use one when there’s room for two. It happened all the time with lights, exhausts and airhorns so, no big deal I reckon. To prove a point Don picked up another trophy at Tatton Park.

    Don has managed to create something very special with this Jag. It has all its Britishness still very evident and intact, because the changes have all been pretty subtle. The use to which the car is put isn’t far removed from its original purpose either. It is still a very stylish, comfortable cruiser. Only now it has a bit more character and a good deal more grunt. It’s my kind of car, mind you – I am a bit of an old man.
    Thanks to - Tatton Park

    BROADSPEED RACING JAGUARS

    Midlands based engineering company Broadspeed was renowned for competition cars throughout the 60s and 70s. Many will remember some of the more famous cars like the John Fitzpatrick BTCC winning Anglia, or Andy Rouse’s Dolomite Sprint. My favourites were the incredible Mk1 Escorts. Heaven knows what they’d be worth now.

    In 1975 there was a rather interesting request by BL to race prepare the Jaguar XJ12 Coupé. These cars were to be entered into the European Touring Car Championships. Extensive modifications were made mechanically to these large machines to provide more power and improve handling and braking. The body received just as much attention too, with a large open grille at the front and deep rear spoiler. The biggest change to the exterior though, were the strikingly large arches.

    These were not only a regular addition to many a Broadspeed creation but, were very much a necessity to house the much larger rims. The Big Cat certainly commanded a presence. Sadly the BMW 650 CSLs were lighter and outperformed the Jags.

    Broadspeed XJ12 Coupé didn’t win but it looked coolest.

    Arches were created in steel not glassfibre.

    Image wheels ape original Cobra Superslots.
    Glass roofs are back in vogue on modern cars.

    ‘I TRIED OFF ROAD TYRES ON THE COBRA RIMS BUT THE NOISE WAS INTOLERABLE’

    Big rims on old cars can look out of place but the #Jaguar-XJ 6 pulls it off with aplomb.

    ‘FRONT SEATS ARE RECAROS TRIMMED TO MATCH THE ORIGINAL INTERIOR’
    Three-speed autobox remains but has locking torque converter.
    Custom stainless manifold is beautiful.

    4.2-litre Jag XK engine has injection cams and three glorious Webers.
    Well petrol’s only 99p a litre – so why not?
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    Andy Starkey

    Jaguar XJ Series-1 Open

    Jaguar XJ Series-1 1968 - 1973 models V12 and R6

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