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    So cool drives the avant-garde Citroën DS & Lancia Flaminia For the modern family Who looked for a large sedan with the latest technology in the 60s, which was found at Citroën and Lancia. Two completely different design ideas were available. Words by Franz-Peter Hudek. Photos Ingolf Pompe Good to know. / #Lancia-Flaminia-Berlina / #Lancia-Flaminia / #Lancia

    Key data: #V6 engine, OHV, 2458cc, 102bhp, 1430kg, 160kph, 1957 to 1970 Price: 34,000 euros (good condition) Character: Representative sedan with complex transaxle drive. Very solid, very comfortable, liked to ride in the Vatican
    Citroën DS 21 Pallas

    Tech data: four-cylinder engine, OHV, 2175cc, 100bhp, 1280kg, 175kph, 1956-1975 Price: 31,000 euros (good condition) Character: The most famous classic from France: unique, detail obsessed, futuristic, comfortable and capricious / #Citroen-DS21-Pallas / #Citroen-DS21 / #Citroen-DS-Pallas / #Citroen-DS / #Citroen

    Is that even a car? Or maybe a spaceship from the Perry Rhodan novels? Who is sitting behind the wheel for the first time in a Citroën DS, that raises this question. Almost nothing is reminiscent of a 1966 automobile, not even the steering wheel, whose only spoke, like the tongue of a reptile, sticks out of an oval mouth. Only a spoke! How should that be?

    And it's extremely light in here. The reason: The high, almost circularly curved windscreen seems to seamlessly pass into the side windows, as if there were no roof posts. This creates a perfect all-round view. That one does not see the front end of the big Citroën is not a handicap. We do not have to follow any bumpy asphalt bands, but float on our comfortable salon chairs simply through the universe. Even the bright, dynamically designed dashboard with a band tachometer embedded in fine corrugated iron and various chrome-plated dials signals the DS novice: This is not a normal car!

    Cool restraint in the Lancia Quite different is the Lancia Flaminia Berlina, whose interior is based on the traditional sporty car towards the end of the 50s: classic two-spoke steering wheel with semicircular Hupring, steering wheel circuit and two large round instruments for speed and engine speed.

    No experiments, just a few little peculiarities such as the indications of oil pressure and oil temperature, tank contents and cooling water temperature, which inform the driver within the round, up to 180kmh speedometer scale. Or a massive handbrake lever installed across the instrument panel, which acts like a handy baton.

    The seating position is similar to the Citroën. However, the Lancia driver overlooks almost a third of his own magnificent automobile: the two fenders pulled far forward and the dominant, only slightly sloping bonnet with the wide air scoop. In general, the aristocratic Italian makes no attempt to hide his impressive 4.85 meters in length. Both the huge forward-curved radiator opening and the tail fins protruding far beyond the trunk lid make the majestic Lancia look even bigger. The Flaminia is undoubtedly a prestigious automobile.

    The goddess from outer space

    The DS, on the other hand, whose name is pronounced in French as "déesse" - "goddess" - also reminds on the outside of a spaceship, which has extended the wheels to land. Its long wheelbase of well over three meters and the compact basic shape with tapered, almost cooler bonnet and sloping mini tail make the large front-wheel drive sedan compact. At 4.84 meters in length, the Citroën is only an inch shorter than the mighty Lancia with its decorative fin jewelry.

    If you were looking for an alternative to a Mercedes-Benz 220S for your family or other prestigious passenger transport in the early sixties, you could choose between these two extreme models. However, the car enthusiastic family man should pursue a lucrative profession, because the two import sedans were not cheap. The 220S with 110bhp gave it for 13,200 Mark, while Citroën for the shown here DS21 Pallas 14,300 and Lancia for the Flaminia Berlina even briskly called 22,500 Mark.

    For this you also got the most modern technology and an exquisite equipment. When introduced in 1957 Lancia a V6 engine made of light metal with initially 2.5-liters displacement and 102bhp, from the end of 1962 with 2.8 liters of displacement and 129bhp. The transmission and differential form a unit with the DeDion rear axle and internal brakes. At the beginning, the luxury equipment also includes rear window wipers and the small side windows which can be opened by the driver using compressed air. The workmanship of the bodywork is impeccable and is at Rolls-Royce level.

    The Citroën DS, which was introduced in 1955, offers even more modern technology: The hydropneumatic system, a complicated high-pressure suspension system, replaces the steel suspension and ensures a constant ground clearance that can be adjusted in three stages. In addition, it levels the rolling and pitching movements in curves and braking.

    The braking system and the optionally available semi-automatic systems also work with a high-pressure system developed for the DS series. Therefore, there is no brake pedal, but only a rubber button, on which one should enter with feeling, in order to avoid full braking.

    Our DS21 Pallas photo model reinforces the spaceship character of the interior with its red fabric upholstery and door panels. Its top features include larger seats inside, rear pocket cups and chrome door handles, exterior auxiliary lights, rubber bumpers, decorative trim, metallic paint and more. The unrestored topex copy with freshly reconditioned technology and new wearing parts was provided to us by the Citroën specialist Dirk Sassen in Düsseldorf. The DS 21 Pallas in Gris Palladium from 1966 is there for sale, contact in the purchase advice.
    DS with removable fenders One of the many peculiarities of the DS is the single-screw rear fenders, which you have to remove to change a wheel. And a four-speed semi-automatic without clutch pedal, the selector lever is mounted above the steering wheel.

    To start the 100bhp four-cylinder we press the selector lever in its neutral position upwards. The first gear engages with a slight body shake, and with little gas we go - no: we take off! In fact, the DS seems to hover almost contactless over the asphalt and can be controlled by the traffic with its fragile-looking steering wheel effortlessly and with little effort. The Lancia, on the other hand, calls for the old-school motorist: the massive, precisely crafted door and the crazy steering wheel gearbox, whose linkage extends to the gearbox on the rear axle, need a little bit of pressure in their handling.

    When driving, however, the heavy car proves to be surprisingly handy. Even without power steering, the Lancia pulls thanks to optimal weight distribution quickly and almost without resistance by fast driven curves. The powerful, quiet and low-vibration VR6 engine also contributes to a superior driving pleasure. Which one should you take? Strict Classicism or courageous avant-garde? Hard to believe: At that time, nearly 1.5 million buyers (all Citroën D models) opted for the avant-garde and only 3943 for the expensive classicism.
    Conclusion

    Does the Flaminia sedan also look familiar? It's clear. Their trapezoidal style shaped the cars of the 60s. The big sedans of Austin, Fiat, Peugeot and others took over this epochal Pininfarina look. By contrast, there are no design items from the DS. There are still many roadworthy classics that amaze us again and again. Franz-Peter Hudek

    Citroen DS
    BODY-CHECK
    ■ Between the tank and the trunk, the box-shaped seats of the rear swingarm bearings sit on the floor of the car. If the Citroën DS rusted through here, then usually the whole car is destroyed. The frameless side windows often get water in the car and ruin seats and panels. If it penetrates the roof, it attacks the C-pillar next to the floor of the car. Because the rear fenders are fixed with only one screw, it is worthwhile to remove them and to check the condition of the C-pillar. Also check: outer box sections of the frame, door bottoms, fenders, trunk floor and the sheet metal under the chrome trim of the Pallas models.
    TECHNOLOGY-CHECK
    ■ With the change to the green LHM hydraulic fluid from 1966, the reliability of the hydropneumatics improved considerably. With well-maintained models it is usually sufficient to change the spring balls about every 100,000 kilometers. Less well maintained DS also leaks in the 34 meter hydraulic system due to corrosion or leaking connections. Steadfast are all engines - even the early Langhuber with only three crankshaft bearings. The DS 23 (especially IE) can get storage problems at almost 200,000 kilometers. The semi-automatic should be adjusted by the specialist.

    PRICES
    At introduction 1965 (Citroën DS 21) ....................................... 13 200 Mark
    Classic Analytics Award 2019 (condition 2/4) .................... 31 000/8500 Euro
    Insurance (Liability / Fully Comprehensive) * ........................... 61.64 / 187.43 Euro
    SPARE PARTS
    ■ Not only because of the more reliable technology, we recommend a late DS, ID or D version. As of 1967, almost every spare part is found - and this is easier than for early versions. These are also characterized by many variants that complicate authentic type-appropriate restorations or repairs.
    CLUBS AND SPECIALISTS
    DS-Club Germany e. V., Wermertshäuser Strasse 9, 35085 Ebsdorfergrund, Tel. 064 07/902 30, info@dsclub.de, www.ds-club.de DS Sassen GmbH & Co. KG (Import, Parts, Repairs), Benrodestraße 61, 40597 Dusseldorf, Tel. 02 11/711 87 02, www.ds-sassen.de Autohaus Schneider, Rosenfelder Strasse 5, 72351 Geislingen, Tel. 074 33/85 08, www.fahrzeuge-schneider.de
    WEAK POINTS

    1 pictures of swingarm bearings
    2 rear crossbeam
    3 leaking roof and windows
    4 A and C columns
    5 door bottoms and sills
    6 frame boom
    7 spent feather balls
    8 leaking hydraulic lines
    9 bearing damage motor (DS 23)
    10 BorgWarner fully automatic

    Practicality •••••
    Spare parts layer •••••
    Easy to repair •••••
    Maintenance costs •••••
    Availability •••••
    Demand •••••

    Lancia Flaminia Berlina

    Under the representative body is modern drive technology, which requires a specialist. Good copies are therefore rare.

    BODY-CHECK
    ■ Anti-rust was a stranger to both Italy and France at that time - often with devastating consequences for the large Lancia Flaminia sedan. Responsible for this are numerous box profiles whose closed cavities are difficult to examine and contain no preservatives. The bare sheet received only a layer of underbody protection from below. Often also dampened insulation material in the rear area developed into annoying rust nests. Other problem areas of the Lancia Flaminia are: lamp pots, fenders in the area of the A-pillar, sills, side panels and the entire rear area with luggage compartment floor and end tips.

    TECHNOLOGY-CHECK
    ■ Properly maintained, the V6 engine hardly causes any problems. However, there are a few peculiarities. So a defective Novotex wheel of the tachometer drive can block the camshaft. Corrosion residues from the silumin (aluminum-silicon die-cast alloy) engine case may clog the water channels, resulting in blown cylinder head gaskets. The transaxle transmission unit with DeDion rear axle requires a lot of service due to the internal brakes and drive shafts. The manual transmission has its own oil pump, whose failure causes damage.

    PRICES
    At introduction 1957 (Lancia Flaminia Berlina) ...................... 22 500 Mark
    Classic Analytics Award 2019 (condition 2/4) .................. 34 000/10 000 Euro
    Insurance (Liability / Fully Comprehensive) * ........................... 51,64 / 192,33 Euro

    SPARE PARTS
    ■ Due to the relatively large number of Flaminia coupes from Pininfarina, Touring (including convertibles) and Zagato - a total of 8700 units - technical and wearing parts are available. It is more difficult in body and especially interior components of the rare Berlina, which often served as a partial donor for the sports models.

    CLUBS AND SPECIALISTS
    Lancia Club Germany e. V., Secretariat: Sanddornweg 5, 53757 Sankt Augustin, www.lanciaclubdeutschland.de Lancia Club Vincenzo, Im Nußbaumboden 7, 79379 Müllheim, Tel. 076 31/79 98 21, www.lancia-club-vincenzo.com B & F Touring Garage, Hauptstraße 183, 53842 Troisdorf-Spich, Tel. 022 41/84 49 10

    WEAK POINTS

    1 mudguard with lamp housing
    2 A-pillar
    3 sills
    4 longitudinal beams underbody
    5 side parts
    6 trunk floor, end tips
    7 head gaskets
    8 drive shafts
    9 Rear brake assembly
    10 gears (bearings, leaking)
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    CLASSIC ON THE CUSP

    First-generation Audi TT

    / #Audi-TT-225 / #Audi-TT-8N / #Audi-TT / #Audi / #Audi-TT-Quattro / #Audi-TT-Quattro-8N / #Audi / #Quattro / #Audi-TT-MkI /

    I know, I know. You’re going to tell me that most alpha males would rather run a triathlon than an Audi TT. Girl’s car, too petite, a suburban trinket. But there’s more than one reason why you should lay down a first-gen TT before prices take off. Forget all the wearisome hairdresser clichés and remember that back in 1999 the world sighed in admiration at the TT’s design. One of the few concept cars that made it to production broadly unchanged, its timeless Bauhaus lines and modernist interior were universally praised and won a slew of awards. The TT was a game-changer.

    And few design icons look so cheap. Even low-mileage MkI TTs are still small change. A private seller in Uxbridge has a silver 2000 coupé with just 56k for £2195 while Surrey Hills Cars in Hampshire has a mint Olive Green 2001 roadster with 59k, one owner and full history for £3490 – and both are 225bhp versions. Spend some time trawling the online classifieds and you’ll find real bargains like the very early ’ #1999 V-reg 225bhp silver coupé with 60k being sold by Brian Whitcombe in Puxton for a just £2000.

    These millennial TTs are the purest and the earliest chassis number cars will become collectible. And if a sixty dash of 6.4sec and 150mph aren’t fast enough for you there’s always the 2003-on 3.2 #V6 and #2005 TT Quattro Sport. The 246bhp V6 cracks sixty in 6.2sec while the lightweight 240bhp Sport does it in 5.9. But the limited-edition 800-unit Sport is the one everybody wants with its contrasting roof colours and brace bar instead of rear seats. Prices have warmed up noticeably of late and you’ll be pushed to find even a mileagy one for less than £7k. As the rarest TT of all they’re the going to be the best investment and low milers could see £15k before long. But the most compelling reason to snap up a first-gen TT is that they’re so reliable and easy to own. Cambelts and tensioners need regular changes, anti-roll bar bushes wear, the frail standard water pump should be upgraded to one with a metal impeller and instrument pod failure is common so look for missing pixels.

    The best TT MkIs won’t stay this ridiculously cheap for much longer. Find a sharp sensible-mile TT with a continuous Audi history and you’ll be buying at the rock bottom of the value curve.


    COST NEW £29k 1998 UK

    VALUE NOW £3000 2018 UK
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    Victory... then defeat

    CAR #1971-Reliant-Scimitar-SE5 / #Reliant-Scimitar-SE5 / #Reliant-Scimitar / #Reliant / #1971

    Owned by Nigel Boothman (nigel.boothman@drive-my.com)
    Time owned Four years
    Miles this month 250
    Costs this month £325

    Previously Tried to get the car going. Failed.

    A sticky starter motor foiled me at the end of the last report, but with that removed, tested and replaced (having found nothing amiss) the car had no excuses left. Time to start that rebuilt engine.

    At this point I thought of all that money I’d handed to the engine builder back in 2015 and of the two years the engine had remained stationary, bar periodic rotations by hand to make sure everything still moved. So I felt the first start and subsequent break-in should be performed in the presence of someone who’d done such things before.

    Luckily I knew Leroy Grimwood, of Dunedin Performance Centre, Edinburgh. With the car transported across town, we gave it a fill of Miller’s running-in oil, span the oil pump drive with an electric drill, fitted the distributor and turned the key.

    The engine burst into life, and continued to roar strongly for the 15 or so minutes deemed adequate to break in all those internal surfaces. With finer timing adjustment and some help from Leroy to make sure the brakes and lights were MoT-worthy, the Scimitar passed its first test in three years.

    All was not well, however. A serious running fault developed as soon as the engine was up to temperature, or if it was parked after a short run and left for a few minutes. Convinced it was fuel vaporisation, I spent hours moving fuel pipes, even re-employing the mechanical pump I’d bypassed when an electric one was fitted. Still no joy.

    I gave up and took the car for analysis on a Krypton machine at the Car Tuning Clinic at Holyrood, where the intermittent death of the HT voltage was discovered. And sure enough, my fuelling problem was electrical – the little electronic ignition unit in my freshly-rebuilt distributor was expiring when it got warm. With points and condenser re-fitted, it ran fine.

    Well… it ran fine when we gave it 20o of ignition advance, though it was supposed to need only 12o to 14o. I was sure the TDC mark was accurate, but I needed some confidence for a 1000-mile ‘running in’ round trip to the Goodwood Revival. With the possibility of some unknown fault hanging over it just two days before the event, I had to take a view. And that view involved my 1991 VW Westfalia camper.

    VW camper van stands ready in the unlikely event of Scimitar failure. 3.0-litre #V6 runs, but needs 20º ignition advance.
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    / #1978 / #Volvo-262C-Coupe-Bertone-Automatic / #Volvo-262C-Coupe-Bertone / #Volvo-262C-Coupe / #Volvo-262C / #Volvo-262C-Bertone / #Volvo-262 / #Volvo-260 / #Volvo / #Bertone / #Volvo-200-Series /
    Price: 16.500 euro. Car Cave, Hasselt, Belgium

    WE ALL KNOW Henry Ford offered his original Model T in ‘any colour as long as it’s black’. But most of us have forgotten that when Volvo launched its oddball 262C Coupé in 1978, the car was also available in any colour – as long as it was Mystic Silver Metallic. Some say Henry Ford II was partly to blame for the Swedish marque’s uncharacteristic foray into the world of luxury coupés. That’s because, during a visit to Volvo HQ, he turned up with a fleet of Lincoln Continental MkIVs – which may have inspired the Swedish designers to think they could create something equally unattractive.

    Whether or not they succeeded is debatable, because there’s something about the 262C that makes it strangely covetable. With its chopped roof sitting 10cm lower than that of the saloon on which it was based, a more steeply raked windscreen, stunted doors and a crowning glory of matt black vinyl, it looks both mean and stately – a sort of poor, safety-conscious man’s alternative to a Rolls-Royce Camargue. At the time, #Volvo didn’t have the facility to manufacture such a limited-production car in house. Therefore, 262Cs were hand-built by Bertone in Turin, with the majority of the 6622 made being exported to the US.

    This 1978, first-series example on offer at Car Cave in Belgium was originally sold in that country, and it remained there until 2006, when it made the short journey across the border to the Netherlands before being re-imported last year. The Low Countries are undoubtedly suited to the sort of sedate performance provided by the 1.3-tonne 262C’s 127hp #V6 which, in the case of this example, is further blunted by the option of a three-speed BorgWarner gearbox.

    Car Cave is asking €16,500 for the model. Given the 262C’s rarity, believed-genuine mileage of 65,000 (108,000km), sound, unrestored condition and the fact that it is on the button, this is probably quite reasonable. And, being a Volvo, it will probably serve you well – although there’s not as much room as usual for the dogs.
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    Five star. This ballistic B5 is packing 500bhp so has the go to back up all that show… Words Davy Lewis Photography AJ Walker. AUDI RS4 500hp B5.

    There’s something about an original that gets under your skin. The first version of something – whether it’s a trainer, a film or a car is somehow special. It’s odd when you think about it, as quite often, the first version of something isn’t quite right. It’s not until it’s refreshed and V2 is releases that everything comes together. This may be true of smart phones, TVs and other tech gadgets, but with cars? I’m not so sure.

    On the one hand, you can’t deny that each time Audi releases a new version of a well-loved model, it will be bristling with technology. It’ll be more powerful, more reliable and generally better all round. Yet many of us still hanker after the original. Nowhere is this more so than with the RS4.

    The original B5 was released in 2000 and immediately made a statement. Here was a 375bhp, four-wheel drive estate car that could outflank a Porsche. It boasted a Cosworth-tuned, twin-turbo V6, fantastic blistered wheel arches and a presence that oozed understated aggression – something #Audi does so well.

    But here’s the thing: the B5 RS4 is now 17 years old. Two further generation of RS4 have been released, with another, the B9, due to drop later this year. But, for many, the original B5 is still the one.

    Forget the fact that it’s been eclipsed dynamically by the newer models. Ignore the issues with reliability inherent in a highly-tuned-from-the-factory machine like this. Put to the back of your mind the horror stories you’ll hear from B5 fans who have almost bankrupted themselves attempting to keep their pride and joy on the road (times this by ten if you’ve tuned it) and focus on the good bits. Of which there are many. Which is why there’s such a healthy appetite for these things.

    So when serial Audi tuner, Julian Loose and our man, Adam Walker, spotted this in-your-face RS4 in Austria, I was keen to find out more.

    On the face it, this is ‘just’ another RS4 with a fancy wrap. It has a taste of the Jon Olsson about it– he of the extreme RS6 and R8 Gumball fame. However a bit more investigation revealed that this was a proper build, featuring a 500bhp engine, tuned chassis and more.

    Let’s kick off with that engine. The twin-turbo V6 needs no introduction. The 2.7-litre unit came with a factory fettled 375bhp and went very well indeed. But, as the years pass, this highly-tuned lump needs plenty of TLC to keep it running as it should. It’s a complete arse to work on and needs to be dropped for many, even routine jobs, which is why it can end up costing a small fortune in labour rates alone. Plus there are numerous documented issues that will occur at some stage from corroded pipework to blown turbos.

    So, it you’re really going to do it, you may as well get stuck in and go for more power right from the off – and make sure you uprate all the necessary parts in one hit. That way, you (hopefully) won’t be spending more time in the garage than on the road.

    The owner, Ilkka, has gone for a tried and tested setup of RS6 hybrid turbos to provide the boost. There are 630cc injectors and a TFSI coil conversion, plus Wagner intercoolers, a cold air intake and custom made exhaust with the cats removed – a sure fire recipe for big fun. With around 500bhp on tap performance is best described as brisk.

    The whooshing of those twin-turbos, combined with the snarl from that unrestricted exhaust means this thing emits the kind of V6 howl that makes you smile. It’s a special B5-ness that you simply can’t find anywhere else.

    The stock transmission copes admirably with the extra grunt and the tough sixspeed box takes it all in its stride. Again the manual gear lever is part of the reason so many people love these things.

    With significantly more power than when it left the factory and with the ravages of time, the chassis needed updating to cope. A full complement of poly bushes was fitted, to remove that saggy, vague feeling that occurs when stock bushes wear out.

    Again it’s a pain in the ass job to complete, but it makes a big difference, especially on older Audis. With less play in the suspension and steering components, the B5 feels tighter and more responsive. To allow the suspension to be finetuned, a set of KW Variant 3s were ordered.

    These multi-adjustable units allow full control over bump and rebound, to provide a sporty, yet forgiving feel. The geometry has been professionally setup to give this RS4 a more dialled feel, with far more adjustablity than the neutral, understeer focused stock set up.

    The final upgrade for the chassis is a set of brakes nicked off a Porsche. These meaty calipers were designed to stop a 170+mph sportscar, so do a fine job on the RS4 teamed up with ECS Tuning discs and Ferodo DS2500 pads.

    Styling wise Audi got it right first time and there’s no need to add bits, aside from the odd splitter or maybe vent if you’re into that sort of thing. So this B5 remains stock, aside from a wrap. Now, it’s not going to be to all tastes, but Ilkka wanted something to make the car stand out at events and the Jon Olsson-inspired camo wrap certainly ticks that box.

    One thing that had to be bang on the money was the wheels. The 3-piece, multispoke Rotiforms fill the wide arches very nicely – and at a girthy 10.5-inches, they should. Some work was required to get them to fit right, but they look great.

    Inside, the stock seats have been replaced with some of the best in the business, Recaro Pole Positions. These fixed back efforts not only look great but also save weight. The GT-inspired interior is completed with a suede steering wheel and gear knob.

    So there we have it – another wellfinished RS4 B5 that reminds us how much love there is for these things.

    TECHNICAL DATA SPECIFICATION #2000 / #Audi-RS4-B5 / #Audi-RS4 / #Audi-A4 / #Audi-A4-B5 / #Audi / #KW / #Rotiform

    Engine 2.7 twin-turbo V6, #RS6 hybrid turbos, #Wagner intercoolers, cold air intake, custom turbo back exhaust with cats removed, custom map, #Siemens-Deka 630cc injectors #TFSI coil conversion
    Power 500bhp
    Transmission 6-speed manual
    Brakes Porsche 911 calipers with #ECS discs and Ferodo DS2500 pads, braided lines
    Suspension #KW-Variant-3 coilovers, polybushed, full geometry set up
    Wheels 10.5x19in #Rotiform-INDT 3-piece wheels with 255/30 Michelin Pilot SuperSports
    Interior Recaro Pole Position seats, suede RS4 steering wheel and gearknob, PLX a/f ratio meter FIS control in the OEM screen to show boost, exhaust temp etc
    Exterior Full Avery charcoal matte metallic wrap

    “There’s still so much love for the B5”

    Above left Recaro Pole Positions.
    Above Alcantara-clad wheel.

    Above top: Porsche brakes sit behind 10.5x19in Rotiform INDs.
    Right: The 2.7 #V6 heart pumps out around 500bhp.
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    EVERYTHING TO EVERYONE: the #Porsche-Panamera-4 / #Porsche-Panamera-4E-Hybrid / #Porsche-Panamera-971 / #Porsche-Panamera-4E-Hybrid-971 / #Porsche-Panamera / #Porsche /

    Panamera for tax avoiders Hybrid tech is a stepping-stone to the future / Words Kyle Fortune

    E-Hybrid is like having your entire meal in one sitting. Starter, main and pudding. Luxury, sports and economy car all in one. As fusions go it’s an interesting prospect, and one that requires the mating of a 2.9-litre #V6 biturbo petrol engine to an electric motor, some batteries and a plug.

    The Panamera 4 E-Hybrid is the Panamera your accountant will like, its 56g/km of CO2 emissions offering sizeable tax advantages, while the quoted 112.9mpg promises serious fuel pump avoidance. The reality will be different, but the 4 E-Hybrid at least offers a useful 31 miles of electric-only range, which will easily cover the majority of commutes. It defaults to that #E-Power mode, and will drive at speeds in excess of what’s allowed in the UK on the motorway using batteries alone; just don’t expect them to last those 31 miles if you plan on doing so. Beyond that you’ll need the 2.9-litre V6 biturbo’s assistance, which can be accessed earlier if you turn the steering wheel- mounted mode switch through Hybrid Auto, or, if it’s the weekend, Sport or Sport Plus. Do that and the combined force of both motors is accessed, giving you the full 456bhp and 516lb ft, for 0-62mph in 4.6 seconds. Quick then, with naughty noises too; but clever as all that drivetrain management may be, there’s the odd knock though the eight-speed #PDK transmission and, for all the pace, there’s a disconnect between car and driver.

    That’s particularly true of the brakes. Tasked not only with stopping but also to regenerate energy while doing so, they rob the pedal of anything approaching conventional feel. The accelerator feels similarly strange. This, plus the greater mass that blunts the other-worldly agility of the conventionally powered Panamera, sees the sports element of the mix somewhat lost in the messy whole.

    There are glimpses of brilliance. In E-Power mode it’s quick, quiet and smooth, a real glimpse of a plug-in future, though it’s hampered by the need to haul all that old tech along just in case – fully electric Porsches are on their way, but hybrids like this are a necessary stepping stone. Forget the Porsche badge and it’s among the best hybrids out there, but consider it as a Porsche first, and hence a car for drivers, and it’s less convincing.

    Some of the Panamera’s excellence is in there, but it’s mired in a load of other flavours: ones that might combine, but ultimately ependently of each other. For now, that is – the breakthrough isn’t far away.
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    Alex Grant

    BEHIND CLOSED DOORS #Audi-SQ5-Stance / #Audi-Q5-Stanced

    3.0 BiTDI SQ5 killing it on 22” rims with lashings of carbon and 570lb ft of torque #Carbon-Clad #Audi SQ5. Built away from the social media limelight and unveiled without warning, Ian Kelly’s impossibly stanced SQ5 is a daily driver with details to die for. Words: Alex Grant. Photos: Si Gray.

    As a global melting pot of ideas, a live feed of projects and a route to finding obscure parts, you’d struggle to argue that the scene would be a better place without the internet. But for all the good it’s done, there’s one thing that the rise of forums, social media, and updates on every detail has robbed us of: surprises.

    That’s not to say we don’t enjoy a good build thread or finally getting to see the end result in the metal when it rolls into its first event. But those show-stopping projects, patiently and quietly put together out of the digital limelight and unveiled without warning, are becoming a real rarity. Which makes them all the more remarkable when they do happen.

    When we first met Ian Kelly back at Ultimate Dubs in #2014 we’d got no idea how he’d managed to keep this one quiet. In six months, he’d turned a box-fresh SQ5 into the talk of the show without even hinting at what he was up to: an impossibly low static drop over 22-inch wheels on a car nobody else had modified to this level in the UK. Impressive not only because the work needed to get it there was more than worthy of a project thread but also because it’s his daily drive.

    “I’d only told a handful of people that I’d bought the car,” Ian recalls. “The plan was always to keep it under wraps until it was ready for its first show. That was quite a challenge given I used it daily – especially once it was lowered. It was spotted a few times but nobody knew who the owner was.”

    Just under three years later and it’s lost none of its impact, the studio lighting picking out every crease of the carbon-accented, Zaino’d bodywork and two-tone Rotiform DUS wheels. But it’s more than just a one-trick car; the result of 15 years of developing ideas, this might just be the ultimate nu-wave build. Ironically, for someone who’s never gone for project threads, that’s something you don’t fully appreciate without understanding the work that’s got into it.

    Even Ian admits it almost never happened. Having moved out of an S3, he’d got far enough down the road of planning a Tiguan build that he’d even bought a Golf R bumper to graft onto it. But the performance, economy and rarity of the e big Audi was too good to pass up. “The key thing about the SQ5 for me was the engine,” he explains. “I wanted big power and torque but without having the fuel bills of a petrol car as my daily commute is 100 miles. Plus the fact the car was so fresh. Apart from the odd Q5 in Japan and the US no one was really modifying them.”

    Plans had started coming together before this car had numberplates. Ian is good mates with Paul Brown at C6 Carbon, having worked together on his previous cars, and they’re used to bouncing ideas off each other. For the SQ5 the route ahead was pretty obvious: the biggest drop, with the largest wheels that would fit, and enough carbon fibre to make a Formula One car feel inadequate. But getting there without the backup of other Q5 owners’ shared solutions to problems was never going to be simple.

    Even the car itself was a leap of faith. “I’d never even driven a Q5, let alone an SQ5,” Ian says. “Some would say that was pretty risky on such an expensive car but I knew I’d love it. It came from Bath Audi, which is a long way from my home in Newcastle, but the drive back home was fantastic. The exhaust note on the 3.0 #V6 #BiTDI in Dynamic mode is like a screaming petrol V8. I was hooked.”

    Ian didn’t make things easy, starting out with a static drop and a need for custom parts to get it as low as the picture in his head. Si Sweetland at StillStatic put him onto Alois Hankover at AH Exclusive parts in Germany to build a 150mm H&R Race Kit for the Audi; the first of its kind, it took two attempts to bring the back end low enough, and caused problems he didn’t notice at first. For example, taking several inches out of the ride height gave it excessive negative camber, lunching a set of tyres in a couple of thousand miles (the same also happens with the A4 and A5). “Everything was very much experimental at that point because nobody else was modifying the SQ5 or Q5,” he says. “I imported a set of 034Motorsport front upper control arms in the hope this would resolve the issue… it didn’t. The kit simply isn’t designed to run on cars as low as mine was, so we had to redesign them and C6 machined a new set to work with our specifications.”

    Even this didn’t fix all the problems. Filling the arches with 10.5x22-inch Vossen CV-T wheels highlighted a total lack of clearance, with suspension components hitting the frame on bigger bumps. Getting the ride height where he wanted eventually meant ditching the rear anti- roll bar and making some ‘adjustments’ to free up extra space.

    “The front and rear chassis modifications mean we can run the biggest drop of any Q5 or SQ5 to date, and it can drive this low static. The trouble was, having got the ride height how I wanted, it was too low to run daily. I was scuffing the fuel tank, so I had to change to air. People thought I was anti-air as I’d resisted it for so long; I wasn’t, I just hadn’t needed it until that point.” The end result of that two-year trial and error is a setup which Ian reckons is pretty much perfect. Paul at C6 Carbon modified a set of airbags to fit the shortened H&R dampers Alois had built for the car, and the kit is controlled via Air Lift 3P management. He drives it as low as it was when it was static but lifts it over tank- scraping obstacles when needed. Not that it’s finished yet. “We’ve got plans for some more front chassis development,” Ian laughs.

    “It just depends when we can fit it all in.” There was, at least, plenty of room to be greedy with wheel sizes. It’s still remembered on the Vossens it was wearing when it broke cover, but they spent only a year on the car before Ian moved on to the set he’d wanted from the start. “I had been a fan of Rotiform from day one and had been chatting to Brian for a while about changing to a set of three-piece wheels,” he says. “They were going to be the main change for the car in 2015 and they were fitted just before MIVW. It totally changed the look of the car, adding more class to it. The centres are painted the same dark black bronze as the Vossens.”

    As easy as it is to get wrapped up in that hard-earned stance, it’s only part of this car’s talents. Ian and Paul’s collective eye for detail is woven through every part of the SQ5. For example, they deleted the chrome before Audi offered that as an option and replaced the seat belts and all the stitching with yellow matched to the brake calipers – one of the few bits of colour left on the outside. Both bits you can miss at a glance.

    Harder to miss, though, is the acres of carbon fibre. Ian had started working with C6 Carbon when he was building his old S3 but the SQ5 took that carbon skinning obsession to an all-new level. We’re even talking boot hinges, the inside of the armrest, even the end caps of the dashboard – parts that are usually out of sight. Everything got treated the same way, with Paul using a larger weave than usual and rotating the roll 45 degrees which means the weave follows the line of the car instead of being diagonal.

    Actually, Paul’s had such a big hand in the project that he’s the only other person who gets to drive it. When it made the trip to MIVW last year with its new RS6-style front bumper, it was Paul who’d fitted it while Ian was on holiday in Ibiza. It had also meant a week of frustration when the new bumper’s paint didn’t match, and a last-minute rush before heading for Valkenburg.

    But it seems Paul likes a challenge; so when Ian opted for seamless air tanks for the boot install, there were no corners cut with the layer you can actually see. Paul skinned the tank in a single sheet of carbon fibre – a job which would usually take three pieces. As we said, it’s as much about what you don’t notice at first, as what grabs you at a glance.

    Ian’s had his hand in where possible, though, as he explains: “The air install was my first attempt at air and hardlines. It didn’t go to plan first time and after a set of PTC cartridges later and numerous lengths of tube, the air install was finally in. Then the management just wouldn’t fire up. Paul eventually found the issue after chatting to Phil James at the Install Company. Somehow the loom was wired incorrectly from the factory. It’s never easy.”

    With 313bhp and 480lb ft of torque, and 62mph out of the way in around five seconds, big performance upgrades were never really on the shopping list. Ian’s swapped to an APR intake and custom DTUK map which takes power up to 370bhp and 570lb ft of torque without denting economy for commuting. He then treated the bay to plenty of matte carbon fibre to bring it in line with the rest of the car.

    Which means – even with a two-year-old daughter and a wedding to pay for this year – life shouldn’t get in the way of SQ5 ownership any time soon. Just as well, really, as it almost happened the other way around. Ian’s fiancée Karen went into labour while he was at Edition 38, leaving him frantically shuffling of the showfield before sprinting back to Newcastle to get there in time. Having poured so much effort into the Audi, 2017 is all about the final details rather than big changes – the priorities, for now, are elsewhere.

    “It’s great taking it all in when it’s parked-up at shows – I love how complete it is yet how simple. There are so many details that most people miss and that is how I wanted it, and how it should have left the factory.” So it’s part of the family now then? “Karen, my fiancée doesn’t mind it although she does say it’s ‘daddy’s silly car’ to our daughter… read into that what you will,” Ian laughs.

    Of course, that’s not stopping him planning further ahead. So, what’s next? “I have a plan for a new car. However, I’m not going to say too much… all will be revealed once the car is ready to show, just like the SQ5,” Ian smiles.

    We love this new-wave Audi, not just for what Ian has done to it but because it’s right out of the old-skool – built the way projects used to be before the internet made every nut, bolt and late night public. For that, Ian, we salute you. Now close those garage doors and get building!




    “Everything was very much experimental because nobody else was modifying the SQ5 or Q5”
    “There are so many details that most people miss and that is how I wanted it”

    Dub Details #ARP / #Rotiform / #Audi-SQ5 / #Audi-Q5 / #Audi-SQ5-3.0-BiTDi / #Audi-SQ5-Tuned / #Audi / #Audi-Q5-8R / #Audi-SQ5-8R / #Audi-MLB /



    ENGINE: 3.0 BiTdi diesel, #C6-Carbon / #APR-intake , #DTUK-Tuning-Box (370bhp, 774Nm), one-off C6 Carbon strut brace, C6 Carbon slam panel and scuttle panel, one-off C6 Carbon R8 washer bottle cap, R8 coolant cap and oil cap

    CHASSIS: 10.5x22” forged #Rotiform-DUS , 265/30 Nankang NS2 tyres, #H&R 150mm #RSS-Race coilovers modified to run airbags on C6 Carbon CNC hardware, Air Lift Performance 3P management, C6 Carbon front upper control arms, C6 Carbon chassis development, rear anti-roll bar deleted

    EXTERIOR: #Xenonz-UK RSQ5 front bumper conversion, C6 Carbon grill surround, C6 Carbon crash bar, C6 Carbon side blades, C6 Carbon rear diffuser, exterior trim painted black

    INTERIOR: Yellow seat belts and stitching, C6 Carbon dash/door trim, sill trims, seat backs and seat sides, RTA Fabrications #Air-Lift-3P controller holder modified to fit into the ashtray, C6 Carbon air install with Speciality Suspension one-piece seamless tanks, C6 Carbon acrylic/carbon illuminated #Air-Lift manifold plate, C6 Carbon fire extinguisher #Air-Lift-Performance-3P

    SHOUT: My fiancée Karen and daughter Grace, my family, my friends, Paul at C6 Carbon, Simon at StillStatic, Alois at AH Exclusive Parts, Brian at Rotiform, Steve and Rod at RA Bodyshop, Simon at Syco Graphix, Matt at Only Charged Dubs, Parm at Car Audio Security, John at Bespoke Leathering, Richard for CAD work, RTA Fabrications, Zeeshan at Xenonz UK Ltd, John at Zaino Europe


    The perfect daily? We’re struggling to think of many cars on the road today we would rather have for the daily drive!

    There’s just something so badass about slammed SUVs isn’t there? Imagine seeing this in your rear view… GET OUT OF MY WAY!
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    Subtle intentions. This tuned A5 3.0 #TDI shows you don’t always need an S or RS badge to have a fast and fun Audi…

    AUDI A5 COUPE Nardo grey 3.0 TDI

    Words Davy Lewis. Photography Dan Sherwood.

    There’s something about a nicely done coupe that never gets old. Maybe it’s something to do with the fact they have only two doors and represent the notion of freedom and style – something that a growing family often puts the brakes on. Or it could be that the designers are given more scope to express themselves with a coupe. Either way, it’s clear that Audi has always been good at them – from the iconic Urquattro that set the benchmark back in the 1980s, right up to the current version of the A5.

    One of the best selling models so far has been the first generation A5. The sleek lines, muscular haunches and purposeful front end sold it for many and it’s no surprise that Ingolstadt churned out a huge number of them. Of course the ones that get all the attention tend to be the S and RS models, but there are others to choose from. One of the highlights is the 3.0 TDI. The V6 diesel is smooth, refined and offers plenty of poke as standard. You may not get the aural satisfaction of an S or RS engine’d car, but as a rapid and capable daily driver, they make a lot of sense.

    Which brings us on to the car you see here. After several unsuccessful years of waiting for the right new car, Marc Wale decided that he would keep his existing A5 and turn it something a bit special This may not be as extreme an undertaking as it first sounds as Marc owns Cheshire-based GM Tuner MW Performance so therefore, shall we say, he had the tools of the trade to take on such a build.

    What Marc wanted to create had to perform as a daily car not purely a show car. He wanted it to retain its Audi heritage so, whilst wanting to build something a little different, it still needed to look as though it could have come straight out of Ingolstadt.

    The first stage was to upgrade the mechanicals. The 3.0 V6 was treated to some bespoke software, a K&N air filter with simple airbox de-restriction, and an S5 exhaust system. With power up to around 300hp and a whopping 600Nm of torque, things were already looking good.

    Next up, the chassis came in for some work. A set of Eibach springs help to reduce pitch and roll, as well as giving a much more sporting ride height. The sleek coupe looks stunning hunkered down over the Raywell wheels, finished in satin anthracite. The A5 is a fairly weighty beast, so a set of TT RS front brakes were adapted to fit, offering improved stopping power. A set of S5 rears were added and help retain the OEM feel of the build.

    Then it was the turn of the interior. After purchasing some very sorry looking and weathered S5 trim at a bargain price from his local breakers, it was brought back to life with a good clean, some leather treatment and various repairs by Chester Autotrim. This was then installed and wired into the car, all programmed up with VAG-COM and complemented by all the S5 carbon fibre inlays – not forgetting the all important S5 logo programmed onto the Audi MMI display, plus hard wired dash cam and Road Angel.

    For the exterior, Marc decided to go for a full respray in one of the most talked about RS colours – Nardo grey. There’s something about this stealthy shade that oozes class in that understated, Audi way and it looks spot on covering the A5. Sprayfiction were entrusted with the job and had it all turned around in just a week – nice work. The grey finish really shows off the sleek lines of the coupe a treat. It was then back to Marc to have the finishing touches completed including the 2012 rear LED light conversion, S5 rear bumper, followed by gloss black folding mirrors and satin black grille and window surrounds. The final stage was a trip to Ceramic Pro North Wales where owner and good friend, Jason, set about the two-day process of detailing the bodywork & interior. The overall result is amazing and the car, once finished, looked literally brand new. So there we have it. Some carefully chosen upgrades have transformed what had become a bit of a tired looking daily into something worthy of a show car, with decent performance to match.

    SPECIFICATION #Audi-A5-3.0-TDI-Quattro / #Audi-A5-8T / #Audi-A5 / #Audi-A5-3.0-TDI-Quattro-8T / #Audi-A5-3.0-TDI-Coupe-quattro / #Audi / #Audi-A5-Coupe / #Audi-A5-3.0-V6-TDI-Quattro-Coupe / #Audi-A5-3.0-TDI / #Audi-A5-3.0-V6-TDI-Quattro-Coupe-8T / #Audi-A5-Type-8T

    Engine 3.0 TDI #V6 , custom S5-style exhaust, modified air box with #K&N filter, custom #Superchips software
    Power 300hp and 600Nm

    Transmission 6-speed manual

    Brakes TT RS front brakes with custom adapters, S5 rear brakes

    Suspension Eibach springs

    Wheels 20in #Raywell design in satin anthracite, #Audi centre caps, 265/30 Dunlop Sport Maxx tyres
    Exterior Painted Nardo grey, S5 rear bumper with gloss black valance, satin grille and window surrounds, gloss black grille and lower front bumper, gloss black folding mirrors, 2012 rear LED lights, de-dadged rear end, PPF applied to the front end, tinted rear windows, chrome RS-style quattro badge on front bumper
    Interior Red leather heated electric S5 seats and door cards, hard wired Road Angel and upgraded MMI system

    Thanks SMV Accident Repair 07903 411975, Ceramic Pro North Wales 01978 661236, Elite Films 0151 321 2151, Superchips UK 01280 816781

    “The Nardo grey paint really shows off the coupe’s lines”

    Above: 3.0 TDI makes an ideal daily driver.
    Left: Red leather S5 interior.
    Above: 20in Raywell wheels.
    Right: 3.0 TDI now makes around 300hp.
    Above: Nardo grey looks ace on the A5.
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    A6 3.0 TDI 850Nm and some amazing images

    Winter Warmer

    Performance Audi contributor, Jape Tiitinen, tells us about his stunning, 850Nm A6 3.0 #Bi-TDI – his daily driver during the harsh Finnish winter…

    A6 QUATTRO Stunning C7 with 850Nm

    For regular readers, our Finnish contributor, Jape Tiitinen needs no introduction. He’s an accomplished photographer, demon skate boarder (even at 43!) and a committed Audi fan, responsible for bringing us some of the most inspirational and exciting cars from all over Europe. When he’s not behind the lens (or busting some moves on his board), you’ll find Jape working on his cars.

    His real passion is a stunning RS4 B5, which we featured back in 2015 – a real labour of love that goes every well as bit as it looks. But for the daily grind, he runs something a little more sensible.

    “When I saw a C7 bi-turbo diesel for the first time I knew I had to get one someday,” says Jape. “I had only three mandatory requirements for the car: it had to be an S-line, in Daytona grey with full LEDs.” The big diesel A6 would serve as the perfect family car, swallow his full camera kit with ease, provide sure footed grip in the harsh Finnish winters, and not bankrupt him on fuel costs.

    “My friend Ville at Realcars.fi. texted me to say he’d found the car from East Germany, close to the Austrian border,” says Jape. “I didn’t see any pics of it (only an equipment list) but I was sold. It was almost fully loaded with HUD, ACC, NVC, Webasto, S-line in and out, air suspension etc.” The car was delivered to Jyväskylä in Finland where Jape collected it right before Christmas 2015. He wasted no time getting stuck into the upgrades.

    “I fitted some 21in RS6 C6 wheels with winter rubber to replace the originals that had summer tyres which are no good in Finnish winter,” says Jape. The following week he ordered an air suspension control module, to lower the ride height, and a sound module from Active-sound.eu.

    “The air suspension module is super easy to use and takes only 5mins to install. You just plug the module into Audi’s own system and save different ride heights to the drive select.” The sound module allows the V6 to really open up and can also be saved differently in selected modes on drive select. It’s a very OEM solution and typical of Jape’s attention to detail.

    Next came some VCDS coding to personalise the car to his own tastes. “I deactivated the start-stop system, but this the button still works if I want it to. I also deactivated the rear wiper. It was really annoying that rear wiper went on every time I put the car in reverse if the windshield wipers are on mist.” Finally, he added the cool RS6-style needle sweep on start up and auto boot closing to work from inside the car and via the remote – very cool. “There’s a good link (http://tinyurl. com/hs39ypk) for all these and tons more upgrades on the Audizine.com forum,” says Jape.

    When it comes to wheels, Jape is a self-confessed addict. The A6 currently has three sets available. In the summer it runs either OEM RS6 C7 21s, or Rotiform 21in 3-piece forged ROCs. In the pics it’s on a set of winters – some RS6 C6 segments with studded Nokian tyres. To fit the 21in wheels, the arches had to be rolled and the camber adjusted, as well as skimming 2.5mm off the S6 discs.

    Lurking behind the rims you may spot a set of red calipers. Jape fitted a set of 8-pot S6 units complete with 400mm discs, with adapters. “These brakes give some serious stopping power. A big thank you goes to STRSolutions’ Sami for install,” says Jape.

    When it comes to performance the 3.0 Bi-TDI isn’t exactly lacking, but when your other car is a 600hp RS4, you need something a bit lively to keep things interesting. These units respond really well to remapping and Jape took his C7 to STR-Solutions and Petri at Erikoismoottori.fi. A headline figure of around 400hp is estimated along with 850Nm of torque – impressive numbers for sure. “The difference between stock 650Nm to current 850Nm is huge – the car pulls like a train, but it sure should with an extra 200Nm!” laughs Jape. “There’s no need for any more in winter,” he smiles. The A6 will be back to STR in the summer to see if they can extract even more power with some further upgrades.

    Perhaps the most impressive aspect of this A6 is the exterior – it looks fantastic. It helps that it’s Dayton grey of course, but Jape has refined it to create something with the presence of an RS6. The gloss black window surrounds, roof rails and door handle tops looks sweet, as does the RS-style front grille and black fog light surrounds. Even the larger oval exhaust tailpipes are black. With the badges removed and the front windows tinted to match the rears, it’s a very moody looking A6 – emphasized by Jape’s stunning images using light painting in the snow. It was minus 5 when he did it, so there’s dedication for you!

    The final upgrade was to put 2016 maps and firmware on the 3G MMI system. “It took me a good two days to upload all the data and transfer it in the system – I don’t want to do that again,” he laughs. This is one of those cars that on the face of it may not have many modifications, but the more you look, the more you see, and the overall effect is absolutely stunning. As Jape says, “With the RS4 sleeping for winter, this has been the perfect daily for me.” Of course, it’s still used during the rest of the year, but as winter transport goes, this has to be one of the finest around.

    TECHNICAL DATA SPECIFICATION #2012 / #Audi-A6-C7 / #Audi-A6-3.0-TDI-Quattro / #Audi-A6-3.0-TDI-Quattro / #Audi-A6-3.0-TDI-Quattro-C7 / #Audi / #Audi-A6-Avant-C7 / #Audi-A6-3.0-TDI-Quattro-Avant-C7 / #Audi-A6-3.0-TDI-Avant-C7 / #Audi-A6-3.0 / #Audi-A6-3.0-TDI-Avant-C7 / #Audi / #Quattro / Audi-A6 /

    Engine 3.0 #V6 #Bi-TDI with #STR-Solutions and Petri at #Erikoismoottori / .fi re-map

    Power 400hp and 850Nm

    Transmission 8-speed tiptronic

    Brakes 400mm S6 C7 discs with 8-pot S6 calipers in front, 365mm S6 rears

    Suspension Factory air suspension lowered with Active-sound.eu control module

    Wheels & Tyres OEM C7 RS6 9.5x21in ET25 with Continental 255/30 tyres, #Rotiform forged 3-piece ROC 10x21in ET35 with Continental 255/30 and winter OEM C6 RS6 9.5x20in ET36 (CB drilled to 66.6mm) with Nokian Hakkapeliitta 8 255/35 studded tyres

    Interior Stock S-line sports seats in black Valcona leather, centre console wrapped in flat black. Head up display, 2016 maps and firmware on 3G MMI system

    Exterior RS6 style front grille, EZ front lip, ACC surroundings painted in gloss black, window trim and roof bars wrapped in gloss black, rear valance painted in gloss black, oval exhaust tips from Martelius.fi, front and rear arches rolled, tinted front windows, semi-dynamic rear indicators, debadged

    Tuning contacts/thanks Fb.com/JTmedia.fi and IG @jap3 https://vimeo.com/ Japetiitinen

    Top: Fiinish plates are way cooler than ours. Fact.
    Left: Front end looks bang on the money.
    Left: Interior is nicely kitted out with options.
    Bottom: S6 brakes and RS6 C6 wheels.
    Above: Loving this front end shot.

    “The A6 pulls like a train, but it should with an extra 200Nm!”
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    / #Volvo-200-Series / #Volvo-264 / #Volvo / #1980 / #brochure

    / #Volvo-264GL /

    The GL model includes the 2.7 litre #V6 fuel injection engine, 4-speed gearbox with overdrive or 3-stage automatic (3-speed), power-steering (hydro), headlamp wiper/washers, central locking, sun roof, tinted glazing, integral rear fog lamps, tachometer, heated driver’s seat.

    / #Volvo-264GLE /

    The GLE illustrated in this brochure includes as standard air conditioning, electrically powered windows, electrically operated door mirrors, rear seat head restraints, rear window blinds.

    / #Volvo-262C / / #Volvo-262 / #Volvo-262C / #Bertone / #Volvo-262C-Bertone /

    Designed and styled in collaboration with Italian designer Bertone, the 262C is only available in limited numbers. Specification includes: air conditioning, electrically operated door mirrors, electrically powered front windows, tinted windows, leather upholstery, rear seat spotlights, power steering, electric aerial.

    / #Volvo-260-Estate Cars / #Volvo-265 / #Volvo-260 / #Volvo-265GL / #Volvo-265GLE

    Performance and specification of the 265GL and GLE are similar to their saloon counterparts. They have exceptionally high standards of design and comfort coupled with enormous carrying capacity. A separate brochure is available detailing the benefits and specifications of these luxury load carriers.
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