Toggle Sidebar
News Feed

Currently filtering items tagged with #Porsche-911-996


  • Post is under moderation
    Trending: #Porsche-911-Turbo-996 / #Porsche-911-Turbo / #Porsche-911-996 / #Porsche-911 / #Porsche-996 / #Porsche /

    One to buy!

    Keep it quiet but word is that smart money is starting to pick up Porsche 996 Turbos while they are still ridiculously cheap. While it’s understandable that regular 996s are at rock bottom because everyone’s scared of the potential engine problems threatened by those nasty initials IMS and RMS, the Turbos (and GT3) used a different engine that isn’t affected in the same way. It seems not a lot of people know that.

    We don’t use the term ‘ridiculously cheap’ lightly. Silverstone Auctions recently sold one that’s as good as you’ll find for £52,667. How good? Try UK market right-hook manual with genuine 13,000 miles, recently recommissioned after dry storage and immaculate. If that’s too steep – or too good to use – Historics followed with a similarly immaculate and well-historied one with 48k. Ready to play, it made £33,880.

    Now look at prices for the two predecessor 911 Turbos, the 993 and 964. Even after settling back a bit recently, their values are on another planet, topping out at £130k. History has a habit of repeating itself. Buy the right 996 and care for it and you may wind up grinning at more than just the driving experience.

    One of the great performance bargains – but for how long?
    Stream item published successfully. Item will now be visible on your stream.
  • Post is under moderation
    Last issue I mentioned how, after a mere three corners of my track day at Castle Combe, my #Porsche-911-C4S-996 suffered epic brake fail, forcing the car into an early finish. I didn’t hang around in getting the problem fixed, remembering my old man’s oft-recited saying that “the most important aspect of a car is its ability to stop”. Long-time readers will recall I changed the brakes on my previous 996.2 C4 to EBC a couple of years back, so the decision to turn to them once again was an easy one, promptly ordering Yellowstuff pads, Dot 4 fluid and braided lines. I then booked the car in at ZRS Engineering down the road in Poole, as Matt there now does all work on my beloved C4S.

    With the car on Matt’s two-post ramp, the wheels were whipped off and the pads removed. They had plenty of meat on them still as they were only installed at the end of 2017 but, as I’ve previously mentioned, I’ve just not been happy with their (complete lack of) feel and performance, despite fluid changes to alleviate the issue. Incidentally the pads had ‘TRW’ on the covers, which Matt informs me is the OEM brand, but whether or not it was just those covers which in this case were TRW remains to be seen. Either way, I took great pleasure in frisbeeing them into the bin.

    EBC’s Yellowstuff pads were then installed inside the C4S’s Big Red calipers: these are intended for fast road and occasional track use, as they offer performance in huge heat ranges without brake fade. Although fashion isn’t exactly a priority when it comes to safety, it was great to see the yellow hue of the pads adding to the visual flare of my yellow KW coilover springs, at least with the wheels off!

    Matt then replaced my rubber factory brake lines with EBC braided items. These will provide additional feel through the pedal, sorely needed in my case, and their braided element offers an increase in longevity underneath my C4S. With identical routing as per the factory lines, their it was simple enough. They’re good value: although the fittings don’t appear to be stainless steel (as they’re painted), they’re still good value when compared to vastly more expensive competitor items. I was pleased to have them fitted.

    Matt did have to make up new hard lines from each caliper as mine had corroded. A 996 will always throw up a curve ball on a job like this, particularly with rust or corrosion on chassis componentry, so the added time needed for Matt to make those up before connecting to the EBC lines was expected, really.

    With the braided lines in place Matt flushed out the old brake fluid, which ran for the hills when temperatures began to rise during the first few minutes of my aforementioned track day. I got two one-litre bottles of EBC ’s Dot 4 fluid, but the reality was we only needed the one. With the system bled, the wheels were soon back on and the 911 once again graced the floor.

    Next step was bedding the brakes in, which I’m still in the process of doing. This is crucial to ensuring the brakes perform well over a sustained period of time. Many people skip this step and then wonder why they get brake fade pretty quickly. The process for EBC’s brakes can be found on their website at ebcbrakeshop.co.uk, but essentially I have to cover 200 urban miles before conducting a series of high-speed stoppages down to 20mph.

    As I say I’m still in that process, and as soon as that’s done I’m heading for the track. What I will say, however, is that even now, after only a few miles, the difference is commendable. There’s now so much feel through that middle pedal that I can push it with confidence, those pads now clamping to the as-new discs with a conviction sorely lacking before. Once this set-up is run in, this is going to be an unbelievable car.

    Living the Legend – 911 owner reports Our contributing enthusiasts from around the world share their real-life experiences with their Porsche 911s

    Lee Sibley Bournemouth, UK

    Model #Porsche-911-Carrera-4S-996 / #Porsche-911-Carrera-996 / #Porsche-911-Carrera-4S / #Porsche-911-Carrera / #Porsche-911-996 / #Porsche-911 / #Porsche-996 / #2002-Porsche-911-Carrera-4S-996 / #Porsche /
    Year #2002

    Acquired April 2017 @lee_sibs
    Stream item published successfully. Item will now be visible on your stream.
  • Post is under moderation
    / #Porsche-M96 short engines reduced / #Porsche-996 / #Porsche-911-996 / #Porsche / #Porsche-M96-generation

    Porsche has reduced the short engine price of its Porsche-M96-generation flat six. Now available for £3,500 from Porsche – a reduction of around 50 per cent – this latest development should weaken the fears of 996 owners who may be worried about total failure of their M96 rendering their cars uneconomical to ix, and may inspire others to make a purchase.
    Stream item published successfully. Item will now be visible on your stream.
  • Post is under moderation
    John Barker
    ‘Some cars can’t cope with the tricky roads of the North York Moors, but the 13-year-old, 60,000-mile 996 Carrera 2 made itself right at home and confirmed that it’s a “proper” #Porsche-911 / #Porsche-911-996 – characterful and capable, tactile and engaging. It’s currently Porsche’s most underrated and undervalued car.’
    Stream item published successfully. Item will now be visible on your stream.
  • Post is under moderation
    David finally buys a 911… #2001-Porsche-911-Carrera-2 / #2001-Porsche-911-Carrera-2-996 / #2001 / #Porsche-911-Carrera-2 / #Porsche-911-Carrera-2-996 / #Porsche-911-996 / #Porsche-911 / #Porsche-996

    DAVID LILLYWHITE

    You know when there’s car money burning a hole in your bank account? How easily it slips away into kitchens, holidays, mortgages and other such non-essentials, when really it should be spent on another highly impractical vehicle. So, with the Citroën SM sold, it seemed I should get on with making use of the cash – but what to buy? My plans veered wildly, but kept returning to the car that has escaped me for 20 years: #Porsche 911.

    It wasn’t so long ago that I could almost afford a pre-73 but those days are long-gone, thanks to everescalating prices (Porsche values started to increase as soon as I sold my 914, it seems). Then I could almost afford an SC but I never found one I really liked. A 964? Well, maybe, but by the time I’d overcome my distrust of that model, they’d shot up in price. Too late for a 993 too, though that would have made a great blend of classic 911 feel and more modern usability.

    What about a 996? I’m sure I remember being as appalled as everyone else when they were launched in 1997 with watercooling and the same front end as the Boxster, but they’ve grown on me and are refreshingly petite compared with the current 911. And they’re still cheap, as 911s go. There are horror stories about leaking rear main seals (not such a big deal) and the self-destructing intermediate shaft bearing (a very big deal. though not as common as is made out, and avoidable). It’s also fair to say that interiors don’t wear as well as in previous 911s. But they’re great to drive, if not quite as characterful as older 911s.

    And they’re going up in value! I was hit with The Fear. Surely I wouldn’t miss out again? It seemed that prices started at £10,000 but, once I started looking more closely, that was for Tiptronic convertibles, maybe with accident repair history, certainly with 100,000 miles or more. I wanted a manual coupé Carrera 2 with full service history and absolutely no previous bodywork repairs. A high mileage I could put up with. Seemed that £15,000 would be needed. I viewed hundreds online, and a handful in the metal. None quite did it for me, the deciding factor often a dubiously coloured interior, or the rather too-common silver paintwork. And then I found a metallic black (with black leather) 2001 Generation 2 Carrera 2 with full history, three previous owners and 52,000 miles. It was just over my £15,000 budget but Gen 2 gives a better-quality interior, torquier 3.6-litre engine (Gen 1s are 3.4) and cleaner styling.

    So as you can see, I bought it. I’m not sure what to do with the registration plate at the moment but other than that I’m delighted! More next month.

    Meanwhile, there was still a chunk of SM money hanging around. I wondered aloud on Twitter about a VW camper (but did I really want another timehungry vehicle?) and was rescued by Toyota PR manager James Clark, who suggested the press garage’s Proace van, converted to a highspec camper for a trip to Le Mans, and about to be offered for sale. You’ll see it above in Toyota’s Le Mans vinyl wrap, since removed. Not quite the classic camper I’d romantically imagined but actually rather useful for long-distance trips to Spa, Nürburgring and the like (when I don’t take the 911). And so another vehicle joins the fleet…
    Stream item published successfully. Item will now be visible on your stream.
  • Post is under moderation
    Porsche 911 GT2 With values of the original GT2 going through the roof, Nick Trott contemplates what this means for his later version.

    Top: the only way is up? Only time will tell if #Porsche-996 / #Porsche-911-GT2 values will emulate those of other rare 911s. In the meantime, Trott’s just going to enjoy his.

    Date acquired June #2015 / #Porsche-911-996 / #Porsche / #Porsche-911-GT2-996 /
    Total km 45,395
    Km this month 350
    Costs this month $0
    L/100km this month 14.8

    The 996 GT2 is defined by the fact it was the last Porsche without driver aids

    I’ve been dodging this subject, but it keeps being raised. So let’s talk Porsches, auctions, market values and the grubby subject of cash.

    The circa $3,100,000 sale (including fees) of a 1995 993 GT2 at a recent RM Sotheby’s auction in London raised eyebrows clean off some people’s faces. How on Earth, they mused, did it achieve significantly more than double the estimate? Well, I’m guessing two very wealthy bidders wanted it very badly – and all but fought to the death over it. Naturally, this means it’s unlikely that the car was bought by a dealer eager to flip it for a quick profit, and so it’s probably gone to someone who will love, cherish and hopefully drive the hell out of it. And this makes me happy.

    The 993 GT2 was always going to be a high-value Porsche. It’s rare (just 194 were built), it was one of the last air-cooled 911s, it looks suitably berserk and, crucially, it is a true homologation special. Plus when you consider that its racing rivals of the day – F40 LMs and McLaren F1 GTRs – fetch big, big money, perhaps the sale price isn’t so absurd after all. So what, people have asked, does it mean for values of the later (2002) 996 GT2 like mine? I’ll be honest – I struggle to care because at present my car isn’t for sale and I can’t buy anything with the equity within.

    I paid c$250K for it in June 2015 – which still gives me cold sweats – and it’s now insured for $350,000. Is it worth this amount? Okay, let’s break it down. Yes, the 996 GT2 is rare (circa 1000 built in total, with around 100 of them right-hand-drive), but it’s not a unicorn like the 993 version. The styling isn’t to everyone’s taste – not modern enough to tempt people out of the latest GT3s, and not yet ‘period’ enough to appeal to the nostalgic buyer. The latter, of course, is also an important factor for those attempting to profit from a purchase: when will the generation who lusted after the car in their teens be in the position to buy one? It’s this trend that’s pushed the prices of the 205 GTi, and some RS Fords, into the stratosphere over the last 12 months.

    Finally, and perhaps crucially, the 996 GT2 wasn’t a homologation special. Instead its story is defined by the fact it was the last Porsche without driver aids. This is a factor, no doubt, because Porsche is highly unlikely to build a high-power, two-wheel-drive, turbocharged semi-track car with uncompromising suspension and zero safety net ever again.

    In summary, the 996 GT2 has significant upward potential – but I guess you’d expect me to say that.

    However, if it ever reaches the giddy heights of that 993GT2, I shall eat my (very expensive) hat. Psychologically, the increasing value of the car hasn’t changed me at all. I figure it’s insured, it’s got a Tracker and it’s always securely parked. I don’t commute in it anyway and I never leave it at the train station, so my driving habits haven’t changed. Most importantly, I still love it and its value doesn’t feel like a burden. If and when the latter happens, I’ll flog it. Until then, it’s a quite magnificent car that best expresses its value in the way it drives.
    Stream item published successfully. Item will now be visible on your stream.