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    / #Audi-R8 / #2006-Audi-R8 / #2006 / #2007 / #Audi-R8-Typ-42 / #Audi-R8 / #Audi / #Audi-R8-V8-Typ-42 / #Audi-Typ-42 /

    (2006-2007) COST NEW £77k / VALUE NOW £35k

    Quentin Willson’s hot tips

    Back in 2006 the first-gen Audi R8 really should have been a massive hit – mid-mounted dry sump 414bhp 4.2 V8 32V engine, alloy spaceframe and monocoque, carbonibre cradle plus 0-60mph in 4.6 seconds and 187mph. Virtually hand-built at the Nekarsulm factory and sharing the Lamborghini Gallardo platform, only 28 R8s were made every day. This was a low-volume alloy supercar with four-wheel drive that was as reliable as a Golf. Yet only 164 R8s were sold globally in 2006, 4175 in 2007 and then, thanks to the 2008 recession, production tumbled to 2101 cars in 2009. The R8’s problem wasn’t only the financial environment into which it was born – it was just too clever and cerebral to catch the market’s imagination. Audi’s minimalist Bauhaus design grammar may have been fine for a TT, but for £77k before options, buyers wanted something that shouted a little louder. In many ways the R8 was too invisible, too quiet and too restrained.

    Back in those midmillennium glory days buyers preferred their supercars to wear prancing horses or bulls on their noses. But for collectors those early cars aren’t just worth seeking out because of their rarity – there are only 400-odd 2006-2007 R8s in the UK – they look howling value for money. Tradepricecars in Essex has a Silver ’07 with just 25k for £39,750 – or half the price of a very average Pagoda Merc. A private seller in Swindon has a black 2007, also with 25k, for £34,995 and it comes with £12k of factory options and full Audi history. That has to be one of the cheapest low-mileage supercars you can buy.

    Despite that prodigious top end those 4.2 R8s don’t feel properly ballistic – for that you’ll need the later V10. At 150mph things feel very stable and even exploring 180mph territory isn’t that scary. This is a well-planted and secure machine with a sublime ride. You’ll love the three turns lock to lock hydraulic steering but avoid the carbon brake option because they’re too grabby. I’d stick to the conventional six-speed manual because the sequential R-tronic isn’t as much fun.

    As a future classic a 2006/2007 UK rhd R8 could be a clever buy. They’re rare, respected, exclusive and technologically awesome. Find one of the very few 2006 #launch-year-examples and you’ll have something that’s already collectible. What’s more it’s a genuine supercar that doesn’t make you suffer to own and enjoy.
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    CAR: BMW / E61 530i SE / 2006 E61 530I / #BMW-530i-SE / #BMW-530i-E61 / #BMW-E61 / #BMW-530i-SE / #BMW-530i-SE-E61 / #BMW-530i-Touring / #BMW-530i-Touring-E61 / #BMW-5-Series / #BMW-5-Series-E61 / #BMW-5-Series-Touring / #BMW-5-Series-Touring-E61 / #BMW /
    YEAR: #2006
    TOTAL MILEAGE: 52,390
    MILEAGE THIS MONTH: 336
    MPG THIS MONTH: 22.1
    COST THIS MONTH: nil

    Life with the E61 continues to be a joy at the moment, although there’s some expenditure on the horizon – hopefully it won’t be too painful. So far, the list of items to be attended to is growing, but I’m saving them up to see if I can get them all done at once. The iDrive is showing that the front brakes pads have about 2,000 miles left in them, but my experience with this system is that it’s rather pessimistic, and that that things often last a little longer… here’s hoping!

    I’ve also started to experience a bit of a creaking from the front end when going over speed bumps, and I can occasionally hear this when turning from lock-to-lock, during slow, parking manoeuvres.

    There’s the soft-close on the off side, rear door to be checked, plus the tailgate rust I mentioned last month. Also, despite my best efforts to clean and adjust the windscreen washer jets, they remain pretty pathetic at their job, so there’s a potential issue there, too.

    I’m hoping that the front pads will be the only item I have to pay for, and that the rest will be covered by the warranty. But, as the policy is the version that has the £250 excess, I’m storing the jobs up to get them all done at once!

    I’m tempted to pop in and see the chaps at BM Sport, so they can give the car a thorough once-over before I go to BMW… at least that way I should know what I’m going to be in for, and there won’t be any nasty shocks when I visit a main dealer.

    More on all this next month.

    This expenditure is in the offing; I’m letting a few niggly jobs build up so that they can all be tackled together.
    Life with my ‘new’ 530i Touring continues to be a joy.
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    CAR: #Ferrari-F599GTB-F1 / #Ferrari-F599GTB / #Ferrari-F599 / #Ferrari-599 / #Ferrari-599GTB / #Ferrari-599GTB-Fiorano / #Ferrari / #Ferrari-V12
    Year of manufacture #2006 (first reg 2/1/07)
    Recorded mileage 26,250
    Asking price £124,990
    Vendor Simon Furlonger Specialist Cars, Ashford, Kent; tel: 01233 646328; simonfurlonger.co.uk


    WHEN IT WAS NEW
    Price £171,825
    Max power 612bhp
    Max torque 488lb ft
    0-60mph 3.6 secs
    Top speed 205mph
    Mpg 11-15


    The F599 is, as Furlonger’s Matt Honeysett puts it, “the last of the monsters”, sharing the Enzo’s engine block, though with the wick turned down from its 661bhp. This car was specced with just about every option, including 20in monolithic wheels, Giallo brake calipers, inset Scuderia shields, front and rear parking sensors, carbon driver zone with LEDs and red rev counter, centre console and carbon ‘Daytona’ electric seats. There’s full history with supporting bills. The front has been refinished to eliminate stone-chips, and it’s smooth under the chin. Each of its four owners must have treated it gently because the (week) 4606-dated rear tyres still have a few mm of tread. The 2012 fronts have lots of life.

    Inside, the carbon dash panels are unscratched, and the rest of it still looks new – except for the seat leather being lightly creased, with slight wear to the driver’s outer bolster. The motor is in factory finishes and dry on the outside; it was last serviced just 500 miles ago, in April 2016.

    It starts instantly on the button, feeling lither than a 6-litre, and is easy to conduct, having the Superfast generation of paddle shift. You have to click through a few menus before it will tell you such things as coolant temperature, but the tyre pressure monitoring system insisted we had a puncture. The bills show that this has had various resets, so we ignored it.

    Of more interest is the menu selectable by toggle on the steering wheel. In ‘Race’ the car is epically fast. Basically, floor it, then see if you can keep pulling the right paddle fast enough to stay in front of the succession of red LEDs that light up around the circumference of the wheel as you approach the 8500 (yes!) redline. It feels as if the back wants to squirm off somewhere over your right shoulder, but somehow the cleverness keeps it all contained and, just as you approach event horizon, the carbonceramic brakes kill the madness like an arrestor hook. Quite remarkable.

    It will come with the books, two sets of keys, warranty, fresh MoT, new rear tyres, a service and Furlonger’s usual six-month/3000-mile warranty.


    SUMMARY

    EXTERIOR Part refinished and like new
    INTERIOR Only slight wear to seat hide
    MECHANICALS Full history; errant tyre pressure monitor needs investigating

    VALUE ★★★★★★★★✩✩
    For Who needs Saturn 5?
    Against Not the subtlest shade for a large 200mph car

    SHOULD I BUY IT?

    Sure to become collectable like the Daytona and 575M – and this one has all the toys. Prices range from £119-150,000, so it’s competitive.
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    CAR: #BMW-E61 / #BMW-530i-SE / #BMW-530i-E61 / BMW-E61 / #BMW-530i-SE / #BMW-530i-SE-E61 / #BMW-530i-Touring / #BMW-530i-Touring-E61 / #BMW-5-Series / #BMW-5-Series-E61 / #BMW-5-Series-Touring / #BMW-5-Series-Touring-E61 / #BMW /

    YEAR: #2006
    MILEAGE THIS MONTH: 1,836
    TOTAL MILEAGE: 52,054
    MPG THIS MONTH: 27.6
    COST THIS MONTH: £27 ( #Tunai-Firey / #Tunai-Creative )

    BOB HARPER 2006 E61 530I

    One of the few defects I’ve found on the car so far is a small amount of rusting at the bottom corners of the rear window. My new 530i Touring has been a pleasure to own and drive so far.

    It’s been a busy month for the 530i and, judging by the miles I’ve covered, I may well have to get on to my insurance company with the bombshell that I’ve woefully underestimated my annual mileage. I had this idea that if I wasn’t commuting to the office every day, I’d cover far fewer miles – perhaps this month will be the exception to prove that rule.

    So far I’m one month into 530i ownership and, to say I’m happy with my purchase would be a bit of an understatement. The first big trip was a Bank Holiday weekend dash to the West Country and back, for a friend’s 50th birthday bash. The E61 shrugged off the 500-mile trip with disdain. Comfortable, quiet, refined – everything you could wish for on a long journey – and perhaps most importantly, it got a big thumb’s-up from Mrs H, who proclaimed at the end of the weekend that the seats were the best she’d ever sat in – they don’t call them ‘Comfort’ seats for nothing!

    The trip did highlight a couple of points of note. I don’t think I mentioned last month that part of the car’s comprehensive spec were adaptive xenon lights and at night in the Devon lanes, these really were very impressive. Perhaps not hugely powerful on their dipped setting, but once flicked to high beam, it was as if someone had strapped a couple of searchlights to the bonnet – they really do light up the road for some distance ahead.

    At the same time, I was able to check out the operation of the night vision camera, but have to admit that this was a major disappointment, or as my son Archie commented: “That wasn’t worth staying awake for!” When it’s switched on you more or less just get a cloudy grey screen and you have to be so close to a heat source for the camera to pick it up, that you’d have hit the object before actually spotting it.

    Despite having run an E61 several years ago, I’d forgotten the various rattles and creaks that can emanate from the rear load cover area and, as I’m a little OCD about these sorts of noises, I’m going to have to try and get to the bottom of them as they are driving me a bit mad. But I might have my work cut out, as the load cover goes up and down (most of the time) as the electric tailgate opens, so any fi x mustn’t get in the way of that.


    While we’re on the subject of the tailgate, I was having a quick look at the load cover mechanism the other day and noticed two small patches of rust, where the split folding glass section meets the rest of the tailgate. They’re at the outer edges of the hatch and I’m hoping they can be attended to under the anti-corrosion warranty. It’s not something I’ve really heard of before on the E61; has anyone else been affected by this problem?

    Another item that’ll need attention under the Extended Warranty is the off side rear door, because the soft-close mechanism no longer works. I’ve never really been a fan of this system, as it just adds weight and complexity but, if the car has it fitted and I can get it repaired without having to pay for it, then it seems worthwhile.

    Just room for two more points before I sign off. Firstly, despite only being a smidgen over 10 years old, it’s easy to forget how far automotive connectivity has come on in that time. The E61 doesn’t have an USB input, which means that controlling music via the iDrive from external devices such as an iPhone or iPod, isn’t currently an option. There’s an Aux input but, quite why BMW decided to locate this at the back of the centre console where it’s only really useful for rear seat passengers, is beyond me.

    While my VW Passat was terminally dull to drive, I did get very used to being able to stream music via Bluetooth, so I’ve purchased a little gadget called a Tunai Firefly, which allows me to stream audio in the E61. It’s basically a tiny Bluetooth gadget no larger than a USB drive, that plugs into the Aux input. It needs power, but this isn’t a problem as the car is fitted with two, 12V power outputs, right next to the Aux input. Once you’ve paired your phone with it you can stream music via the Aux input section of the Entertainment menu on the iDrive. Sadly, you can’t go to the next track or anything like that without touching the phone, which is obviously a no-no these days but, as I quite often just listen to audiobooks on longer journeys, this isn’t a problem for me. I’ll find a more long-term solution for this with one of the various aftermarket systems but, as a quick-fix measure, I’m very pleased with it.

    Finally, a word about the sat nav. Perhaps I’ve been spoiled by driving so many modern cars whose iDrive set-ups are akin to superfast broadband, but the system in the E61 is more like going back to using a dial-up modem! It’s so slooooow and clunky to use, I find it hard to believe we used to think it was pretty good. It is possible to retrofit the later, CIC navigation system (which would also sort any connectivity issues), but this is likely to cost about £1,000, To put that in perspective, it’s.

    This neat little device enables me to stream audio from my iPhone; a connectivity feature not available in the E61.
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    YEAR: #2006
    MILEAGE THIS MONTH: 106
    TOTAL MILEAGE: 50,218
    MPG THIS MONTH: 20.4
    COST THIS MONTH: Not telling!
    CAR: #BMW-E61 / #BMW-530i-SE / #BMW-530i-SE-E61 / #BMW-530i-Touring / #BMW-530i-Touring-E61 / #BMW-5-Series / #BMW-5-Series-E61 / #BMW-5-Series-Touring / #BMW-5-Series-Touring-E61 / #BMW /

    With the M6 gone and the Passat shortly to be returning to the leasing company who own it I was rapidly running out of time to purchase some new wheels. I’d more or less decided on an E9x 330i – Saloon, Coupé or Touring, I wasn’t going to be too fussy, but if the right car came up a Touring was the ideal option as it just gives that added bit of practicality while not losing out dynamically to its two- and four-door relations. Just about the only stipulation was that it would have to have the N52 engine as I didn’t fancy shelling out £1500 when the N53 incarnation would inevitably fry its injectors and that the car would have to have heated seats, and would preferably have an auto ‘box. I went and had a look at a few and in the price range I was looking at the cars really weren’t up to scratch. Of course most things can be fixed, but if you have to shell out on remedial work just after buying a car you might as well buy a better one in the first place. And my budget wasn’t looking too healthy.

    After a few wasted journeys it was always back to the drawing board and then one Saturday morning the car you can see in the pictures popped up on my saved searches from when I’d been considering a 5 Series. Reading the ad had my mouth watering and I was on the phone and arranging a time to go and view the car before you could say, ‘But it’s not a 330i!’

    It was close to me and had a spec to die for – Comfort seats complete with heating, ventilation and massage functions, Professional sat nav, Bluetooth, Style 32 alloys, an electric tailgate as well as Night Vision and best of all a Head- Up-Display. And I love a HUD.

    Mindbogglingly for a 2006 machine it had only covered 50k miles and the icing on the cake was that it’s still under a Comprehensive BMW extended warranty until November this year. The extra layer of icing was that it was cheaper than all the 330is I’d looked at.

    So, it’s a 530i, and the first thing I’m getting used to is its thirst, but that was a conscious decision I took – not to buy a diesel. Living in London and having a non-Euro 6 diesel doesn’t really mix any more (or shortly won’t when the new Ultra Low Emission Zones kick in) and as I couldn’t justify spending Euro 6 diesel money on a car I decided it would have to be a Euro 4 compliant petrol, which thankfully the 530i is.

    I’ve literally just picked it up so have done less than 100 miles so far, but as far as I can work out everything works and it drives very nicely indeed. There are a few body blemishes that need attending to and the biggest decision I’m going to have to make will be whether or not to invest in an M Sport body kit as I do think they look so much better in M Sport guise. I’m currently telling myself that with the money I saved on buying the car I could easily justify the expense of getting the styling upgraded… Watch this space.
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    Forecourt find #BMW-M6 / #BMW-M6-Coupé-V10 (E63) (2005-2010)

    / #BMW-M6-Coupé / #BMW-M6-Coupé-E63 / #BMW-M6-E63 / #2006 / #BMW / #BMW-E63 / #V10 / #BMW-V10 / #BMW-6-Series / #BMW-6-Series-E63 / #BMW-6-Series-M6 / #BMW-6-Series-M6-E63

    With the current F13 model now firmly established in the UK second-hand market, values of the previous E63 V10 incarnation continue to fall – marking this generation of M6 out as a seriously good used buy. Something like this £18,995 65k-mile black Sapphire Metallic example, advertised at Birmingham specialist The Barclay Motor Company, would make an ideal buy. This particular car comes with a carbon roof, heads up-display, an eight-inch TV, Bluetooth telephone prep, black Merino leather upholstery, and 19-inch alloys. And with 507hp, a 4.6-second 0-62mph time and that exclusive V10 soundtrack, every journey will put a smile on your face.
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    Fancy an Alpina B7 but don’t have the £115,000 required for a new one? Then how about a used E65? It’s a great car for a very reasonable amount of money… Words: Matt Robinson. Photography: Chris Wallbank.

    Old School Rules

    We look back at one of Alpina’s ultimate executive expresses, the stunning E65 B7.

    Chris Bangle – a genius ahead of his time or the man who wreaked the most stylistic havoc on the BMW canon in the marque’s storied history? It’s a debate that continues to rage to this day, seven years after the controversial, bearded American left Munich for design pastures new. It’s an argument in which we’re not going to try and convince you one way or the other if your mind is already made up but we will at least pin our colours to the mast and say we think he was definitely onto something good with his work. His era of flame-surfaced BMWs remain classy and elegant today, with the subsequent models that followed not exuding quite the same crisp lines or distinctive appearance. For instance, the original Z4, with the pre-facelift round rear light clusters, could be argued to be the prettiest #BMW roadster of the lot.

    The E60/61 5 Series, in M Sport guise and on big wheels, can even to this day still elicit a ‘phwoar’ from us when it drifts past on a motorway. And the E63/64 6 Series? That’s surely Bangle’s finest hour… Perhaps his most controversial design, though, was the fourth-generation 7 Series, known as the E65 in short-wheelbase form and E66 as the stretched variant. It really was a shock to the system when it launched in 2001 with its ‘eyebrow’ front lights and a very, very American rear. However, it was dramatically face-lifted in 2005 into a model that was perhaps more widely acceptable, if a little less idiosyncratic. And it’s that post-facelift E65 that we’re looking at here, in its ultimate guise as the storming Alpina B7.

    Developed in the era when Buchloe went from a confusing mishmash of letters and numbers for its cars (C2? A1? B12?) to simply designating the letter ‘B’ and then the series number of the BMW it was based on, the mighty B7 took the then-biggest Munich V8 in the form of the 4.4-litre M62 and slapped a mechanically-driven radial supercharger onto the side of it to liberate massive numbers of 500hp and 516lb ft of torque.

    That compares well to the recently launched current B7, based on the sixth-gen G11 7 Series, which also has a forced induction 4.4-litre V8 – albeit a twin-turbo unit – rated at 608hp and 590lb ft, all for £115,000. It’ll do 0-62mph in 4.2 seconds and a top speed of 205mph, numbers that aren’t a huge step above the old 2006 model’s 4.9-second time and 187mph. And you can bag this particular example, in trademark Alpina ‘Dunkelsaphirblaumetallic’ paint, resplendent in side stripes and sitting on a 21-inch set of 20-spoke ‘cotton reels’, for less than half the price of the new car. It’s on sale at Kahn Design in Bradford, a specialist in rare exotica including Alpinas; it was here where we recently sampled the ultra-limited V8 Roadster based on the Z8. At the time of writing, Kahn actually has two B7s on the stock sheets: this 2006 car that began life in Japan that’s on sale for £49,995; and a left-hand drive pre-facelift model with a black interior up at £39,975. So, if you can stomach the challenging looks and sitting on the wrong side of the car, you could save even more cash on the older Alpina.

    However, it’s car No.111 out of a global build run of just 141 units that we think represents all that is good about the Bovensiepen family’s concern. There’s a lack of ostentatiousness (big lip spoiler on the bootlid notwithstanding) about this executive express that truly appeals. No quad exhausts, no overtly loud soundtrack on start-up – it’s just a cultured saloon car that happens to have a really, really potent engine.

    It’s also as close to a new one as you’ll get if you want an E65 B7. It has covered just 36,000km, or around 22,500 miles, and the bodywork looks pristine, free from rust and dings and generally in what you could accurately call showroom condition. The same goes for the interior, which is finished in cream and is free from rips, tears, squeaks and rattles. Everything works as it should, and there’s a lot of technology on the E65 that could go wrong, while the Alpina logo is present and correct on the dashboard trim, with Buchloe’s rhoms and roundels on the seats and the armrests on the doors. It’s a classic look for an Alpina.

    There’s nothing classic about the driving experience, though, because this is a modern enough performance car that still feels epically quick on the road. When the E65 B7 first appeared in 2004, the story went that while it was testing on the Nürburgring, it was going at such pace along the main straight that the E46 M3 CSLs, also undergoing factory shakedown, were receiving aerodynamic tows from the big barge to cut their lap times. Astonishing.

    And this example feels every bit as strong as that claim. The B7 burbles out of Bradford in an exquisite display of luxury limo comfort, the ride supple, the throttle beautifully judged and the V8 motor quiet and hushed. Bizarrely, the sat nav hasn’t been updated for European spec as yet, so the car thinks we’re in a prefecture of Japan, just outside Tokyo; such a cutting-edge place is a world away from the faded woollen mills and Victorian industrial buildings of this particular area of West Yorkshire.

    But then, as we emerge onto winding moorland roads, the chance to open the Alpina up presents itself and suddenly the absent-minded sheep ambling along the Tarmac are in very grave danger of becoming mutton, courtesy of a two-ton Bavarian missile. Wow, the 4.4 has absolutely monster pick-up. It’s connected to the six-speed Alpina Switchtronic transmission, which – during the city driving phase – is predicated to setting off in second gear, making the gearbox seem like a lazy, smooth five-speeder. But out here, with the throttle pushed to the bulkhead, the Switchtronic awakens, offering crisp downshifts out of bends and firing in the next ratio going up the transmission when accelerating rapidly along the straights.

    The B7’s rich, baritone voice is more pronounced, too, once the tacho gets past the 2500rpm point, but as this is an old school, torque-rich V8, there aren’t loads of revs to play with. No matter; make the best use of that 516lb ft midrange and the Alpina simply hurtles along. It’s incredible to think, when experiencing its military-grade firepower, that the B7 couldn’t usurp the iconic E34 B10 Biturbo (188mph) as the fastest Alpina of all time; it had to allow the E60-based B5 of 2005 that signal honour, the 195mph Five, of course, using precisely the same drivetrain as the B7.

    Also fitted to the Kahn Alpina is the optional Dynamic Drive active anti-roll system, which genuinely does allow the B7 to change direction with an alacrity that speaks more of the 3 Series, rather than a gigantic Seven. Shame, then, that the steering is rather too US-spec – light and lacking feel. It’s direct enough and the Alpina turns in keenly but if you’ve driven a lot of performance BMWs over the years this will feel like a woolly setup. You probably also won’t be using the Switchtronic plus and minus buttons, mounted on the back of the steering wheel, to change gear, because they’re not as intuitive as a good paddle-shift is nowadays and the six-speed autobox is fine left to its own devices in D.

    The rest of the Alpina B7’s dynamic make-up is excellent. Large 374mm front, 370mm rear discs lifted from the contemporary 7 Series do a fine job of hauling the saloon down from high speeds with little drama, while Buchloe also felt the standard suspension of the E65 was more than capable of dealing with the grunt of the supercharged engine. And for all those occasions when you can’t utilise the 4.4-litre’s massive reserves, then the doubleglazed windows and impressive aerodynamics make the B7 a near-silent cruiser. The only fly in the ointment is the early version of iDrive still fitted to the car, which does have the menu shortcut button, but which features the eight-way options click override. It’s nothing like as nice and simple to operate as BMW’s current software, but that’s the price you pay for a 500hp rarity like this.

    At almost £50,000, this is not a cheap example of the E65 7 Series; you could probably get yourself in a V12 760Li for less than half as much again. But, given Alpina sold just 11 of these E65 B7s in the UK during a three-year period, it is almost certainly an appreciating classic and the chance of getting behind the wheel of such a collector’s piece, that looks so stunning in this particular colour combination and which has clearly been very well looked after in its previous life, seems like too good an opportunity to miss. An utterly brilliant, super-scarce, 187mph super saloon for less than the price of a fully specified modern day hyper hatch? Seems like a no-brainer to us.

    CONTACT: Kahn Design / Tel: 01274 749999 / Web: www.kahndesign.com

    Suddenly the sheep ambling along the Tarmac are in very grave danger of becoming mutton, courtesy of a two-ton Bavarian missile.

    TECHNICAL DATA #2006 / #BMW-Alpina-B7-E65 / #Alpina-B7-E65 / #Alpina-B7 / #Alpina-E65 / #BMW-E65 / #BMW / #Alpina / #BMW-E65-Alpina / #BMW-7-Series / #BMW-7-Series-E65 / #BMW-7-Series-SWB / #BMW-7-Series-Alpina /

    ENGINE: #V8 , 32-valve, #supercharged
    CAPACITY: 4398cc
    TRANSMISSION: Six-speed #Alpina-Switch-Tronic / #ZF6HP
    MAX POWER: 500hp @ 5500rpm
    MAX TORQUE: 516lb ft @ 4250rpm
    0-62MPH: 4.9 seconds
    STANDING KM: 22.9 seconds
    TOP SPEED: 187mph
    ECONOMY: 22.1mpg
    CO2 EMISSIONS: 306g/km
    WEIGHT: 1960kg
    PRICE (new): £78,950 (2005)
    PRICE (today): For car 111 of 141: £49,995

    The B7 features a wonderfully opulent cabin with swathes of leather and alcantara along with Alpina’s trademark wood trim.
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    / #BMW-E46 / boot floors… again! / #BMW-M3-E46 / #BMW

    Talking to the owner of a #2006 E46 #BMW-M3 the other day reminded me that these cars are still having issues with boot floor cracks – in fact this one had just been approved for a main dealer repair involving a complete new boot floor. That’s very good of course but it may eventually happen again. The thorny subject of which cars could suffer can be answered here and now – probably all of them. I’ve seen a 2003 model 320d suffer but 316i and 318i cars will probably suffer less. In the old days, the answer was to weld plates on top of the affected sections but this has been proven to be not much more than a sticking plaster. The reason why they crack (almost always on the passenger side rear by the exhaust box) isn’t due to road shocks, but the twisting action of the whole rear subframe under acceleration – the mount is being pulled rather than pushed.

    Dan Harborow of E30 fame (07821 314623) is now doing some serious repairs and reinforcing on these cars, including the rear subframe front mounts. Dan removes the rear seats and trim and, using a plasma cutter, removes a section of the upper boot floor before welding in a specially cut and fabricated extra box section, as well as some other reinforcements. He then welds that boot floor section back in, grinding and polishing the welds back and sealing/painting. The quality of the work is up to Dan’s usual standards and once done, it will never crack again – and having seen the job this is pretty much the definitive E46 boot floor repair.
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    Ben Barry
    Phil Waqairoba #BMW-E66 / #BMW-750Li / #BMW-750Li-E66 / #BMW-7-Series / #BMW-7-Series-E66 / #BMW-7-Series-E65 / #BMW-E65 / #2006 / #BMW

    Phil’s 2006 750Li is the ultimate luxury machine, which he’s enhanced with a few choice mods. When he bought the car a year ago it was on 22” X5 wheels but these have been replaced with a set of tasty staggered #Rohana-RC10 s, also 22s. They’re nice on their own, but look better still with the big Seven sitting 30mm lower, while the head and tail-lights as well as the windows have all been tinted, adding hint of menace. Finally, there’s a custom rear box with 90mm pipes, courtesy of MStyle, which gives this 750 a proper #V8 soundtrack.
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    Somehow it seems Hideo Hirooka has had his fingers in play on all Volkswagen from the far East. The one or other will now think...Hideo Hirooka? Never heard of him. But when you mention his company, Voomeran' it will most likely click. With Voomeran he made himself a name outside of the Asian continent, where he is one of a few Japanese that don't go over the top wide with their kits but much rather discreetly pulling out the original lines. Just like his Mk5 R32 Golf, where all parts come from his shelves, housing the 9,5" wide Rotiforms under the widened wheel arches.


    / #2006 / #VW-Golf-V / #Volkswagen-Golf-V / #Volkswagen-Golf-Mk5 / #VW-Golf-Mk5 / #Volkswagen / #VW / #VAG / #Volkswagen-Golf / #VW-Golf / #Volkswagen-Golf-Mk5 / #Voomeran / #Rotiform MUC 18X9.5 ET15 / Pirelli P-Zero 215/35-18 / #AirLift / #Volkswagen-Golf-R32-Mk5 / #Volkswagen-Golf-R32 / #Volkswagen-Golf-R32-V / #Volkswagen-Golf-R32-Voomeran / #Volkswagen-Golf-Voomeran / #Volkswagen-Golf-R32-Voomeran-V / #Volkswagen-Golf-R32-Voomeran-Mk5 / #Volkswagen-Golf-Voomeran-V

    Parts like this can be found for the Mk2 up to the current Mk7 in his shop and recently the Audi B8 series was added. With such a „German" portfolio, it's time to show more presence in the motherland, which gives us a nice project for the autumn months.
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