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    Car #1983-Citroen-CX-IE-Familiale / #1983 / #Citroen-CX-IE-Familiale / #Citroen-CX / #Citroen

    Year of manufacture 1983
    Recorded mileage 43,861
    Asking price £6950
    Vendor Pioneer Automobiles, near Newbury, Berkshire; 07711 509600; www.pioneer-automobiles.co.uk

    WHEN IT WAS NEW
    Price £10,171
    Max power 128bhp
    Max torque 148lb ft
    0-60mph 11.3 secs
    Top speed 115mph
    Mpg 25

    This rare S1 survivor came from the James Hull collection via Jaguar Land Rover Classic, its Familiale name meaning three rows of seats. It presents well, though bodily it’s not perfect, with some bubbling at the door bottoms, tops and wheelarch lips, plus various other paint blemishes, but it has good sills and is very solid underneath. It has an amazingly well-preserved interior, which is the hardest thing to put right on these. It has a very good history file, too, including eight service stamps to 43,730 miles in April 2012, plus certificates for Dinitrol protection from new, redone in 1984.

    The stainless-steel bumpers are okay, and the tailgate at least has been repainted, its window still bearing the supplying dealer sticker from Ing’s of Maidenhead. The tyres are a mix including one old Michelin MX, with an original and unused XAS on the spare, and the scuffed wheels are lightly corroded. There is very little dampness underneath, so the hydraulics haven’t sprung a leak. Inside, it’s almost unworn. There’s one small hole in the left rear seat, another in the driver’s seat, one mark on the left front carpet and the driver’s door stay doesn’t work. That’s about it: the dash plastics are perfect, and the soft, rubberised parts such as door pulls haven’t started crumbling.

    Under the bonnet it’s ‘used’ rather than concours, but the coolant is pink, the oil cleanish, the LHM fluid level okay. The injected 2347cc ‘four’ starts easily with a bit of belt squeal and idles quietly, with no exhaust blows. From the kneeling position (we had to drop it because it was sitting level) the suspension lifts within 10 secs. It drives very well: the auto ’box suits the imperious ‘magic carpet’ bearing of the big estate, plus it changes smoothly and kicks down readily – and the gear indicator telltales all work, as do the revolving-drum instruments… but not the oil-level gauge. The temperature needle sits centrally, and the cooling fan cuts in normally when you stop after a run. The electric windows work but the air-con doesn’t at the moment. The CX will be sold with its original handbook, guarantee card, key numbers card and a new MoT.

    SUMMARY

    EXTERIOR Unusual colour; some paint bubbles
    INTERIOR Extremely well preserved
    MECHANICALS Lowish mileage; drives well
    VALUE ★★★★★★★✩✩✩

    For + Rarity, originality and unusually good interior
    Against - Paint shows some blemishes; air-con doesn’t blow cold

    SHOULD I BUY IT?
    If your antiques business requires the retro-chic finishing touch, this Citroën is simply huge inside. And good luck finding another!
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    Suitably attyred / #1983-Porsche-944 / #Porsche-944 / #Porsche / #1983

    Owned by Glen Waddington

    Two kids, two mortgages, two oldish potential money-pits in the garage… And it’s been an extremely busy year. So much so that the 944’s road tax became rather suddenly due, at which point I realised it needed an MoT, too. And it failed.

    Nothing major, thankfully, but, even without any other work, the need for four new tyres meant I’d have to save up for a while. Before you knew it, late summer had turned into deep winter.

    I booked the Porsche in with Templeton’s Garage (www. templetonsgarage.co.uk), my local performance car specialist, owned and run by my mate Stuart Templeton. He’s serviced and worked on my BMW a couple of times, and it’s come back feeling so much better as a result. And he knows 944s as well as he knows E30s…

    First I wanted to sort my tyres. Handily, Vintage Tyres of Beaulieu (www.vintagetyres. com) is run by another mate of mine, Ben Field – we used to work together years ago on another magazine. I’d bumped into him at Goodwood Revival, and our tyre conversation grew from there: which make to go for? And which size?

    The latter was something of a mystery. It’s well-known that some Porsches of that era ran bigger tyres at the back, and the Michelin handbook states that standard-fit OEM front tyres for an ’1983 944 should be 185/70s. Only mine was on 215/60s all-round. Hmm.

    The Porsche-approved fitment is a Pirelli but, well, I told you about my financial commitments earlier. So Ben did some digging and suggested Continental Premium Contacts in the 215/60 size. But then he discovered that Dunlop makes a matching set (185/70s plus 215/60s, V-rated for 15in wheels) in its new Sport Classic range. And they’re much better suited to my budget than the Pirellis or the Avon ZZs that are also available in that combo.

    But then I did some digging. I discovered my original dealer brochure, which states that 185s are standard and 215s optional – though, unlike with the 911s of that era, they’re not mixed. I have a Porsche certificate of authenticity too, which lists the options my car was fitted with at the factory. Bingo! It should be on the 215s after all.

    So, 911 owners, you now have an option other than Pirelli for your odd-sized tyres. And, while I’ll report more on their ultimate grip next time, I have a set of Dunlops that look suitably period, are quiet, ride well, and have proved suitably safe in recent cold, damp weather.

    As for the rest of the works, Stuart discovered that the 944 was running lean and turned up the wick a little. That, and fresh sparkplugs, seem to have liberated more power! It revs much more keenly, and sounds sharper and deeper as it digs in from around 2500rpm.

    All four brake calipers have been rebuilt, and now bite harder. Best of all, my 944’s strange tendency to tramline and to weight-up in corners is now banished. Perhaps the tyres (29psi front, 36psi rear) are due some credit. But I reckon that refitting the front anti-roll bar the right way round certainly has something to do with it…
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    Retro Cool More-door Mk2 featuring 16v on ITBs and centre-lock mag wheels. Words: Daniel Bevis. Photos: Patrick Hille.

    RACE RETRO

    Unstoppable VW modder Dominic Timmermeister has somehow squeezed a race car’s soul inside this super-early base-spec Mk2. How? With extreme wiliness. Why? Well, why not?

    Deutsche Tourenwagen Meisterschaft, the DTM, has always been the BTCC’s shoutier, more aggressive cousin. Pumped up silhouettes packing insane horsepower; the very mention of those three iconic letters conjures images of Germany’s finest – caricatures of Mercedes-Benzes, BMWs, Audis, Opels, all kicking ass and taking names across the Fatherland and beyond. But in the late 1980s, the Americans invaded… spectators watched agog as Ford rolled out the most powerful car on the grid, the Mustang GT, ejaculating a filthsome 520bhp all over the startline. Ruch Motorsport led the charge, with Gerd Ruch the main man behind the mighty Mustang’s chunky wheel, desperately trying to hold on as the bucking bronco terrorised the raceways of Western Europe.

    Meanwhile, somewhere else in Germany and entirely detached from the smoky crucible of DTM, a little old lady, sweetly smiling, was innocently pootling around town in her pride and joy, an early Mk2 Golf in a rather spiffy shade of Irish green. An early adopter, she’d put an order in for one of the very first Mk2s, a boxfresh 1983 three-door in unashamed poverty spec: wind-up windows, brown dash, the full spectrum of beige tones. It was an unusual car splashed on a palette of mundanity; low-spec but deliberately eye-catching in its offbeat colour choice. The car was loved, cherished and looked after. An object of pride; nary a scuff, scrape nor car park ding to spoil the originality.

    Fast-forward a generation or so, and we weirdly find these two entirely disparate worlds unexpectedly colliding, thanks to serial #VW perv Dominic Timmermeister. This is a man who knows his way around a rattly old Dub, having owned 40 or so in various states dotted along the awesome>wonky spectrum. Resident of the Lower Saxony municipality of Bad Laer, he’s been the curator and resurrector of a couple of dozen Golfs alone, and one day in 2013, during an idle flick through the online classifieds, he spotted an opportunity that was too good to pass up. “I saw this Irish green car for sale, and I just had to buy it for the colour alone,” he laughs. “I love the Mk2 Golf, especially the early models like this, so I had to make it mine.”

    These early Type 19 Golfs are a riot of detail for the truly nerdy minutiae spotter; while the overall form is familiar, they don’t have the central VW badge on the rear panel, they have quarterlights with mirrors set behind them, the indicator stalks are smaller, they don’t have seatbelt adjusters or speakers in the doors… all pernickerty stuff, but this matters to fullyfledged retro obsessives. And so the act of finding a fully original survivor, complete with wind-up windows and the kind of upholstery that’d make a killing in a boho Shoreditch boutique under the banner of ‘shabby chic’, was understandably something rather exciting for Dominic… not that he intended to keep it all original, of course. This isn’t that sort of magazine.

    “I guess the overall theme of the car is a sort of undercover retro with race car parts,” he grins, and that’s very much the kind of place we want to be. You can’t exactly call it a sleeper as the wheels are a bit of a giveaway – it’s more an updated survivor with a contemporary twist. Think of it as being the sort of canal boat or ice cream van you’d see on that George Clarke show on TV (you know, the one where he has to refer to every room he ever sets foot in as “an amazing space”, to keep reminding you what the show’s called), whereby an iconic technological relic is repurposed for modern living. What Dominic’s done here is to reboot the earliest Mk2 he
    could find for a 2017 audience. And if you think it’s just a case of stop, drop ’n’ roll, perhaps you should start by taking a peep under the bonnet. Now, in the swirling mists of time, story details tend to ebb away until you’re forced to deal with the apocryphal, at least in part. No-one but the very dorkiest keeps fastidious records on base-model runarounds, so we don’t know which engine that little old lady originally spec’d (or, indeed, if there was any little old lady involved in the story at all – but shhh, don’t ruin the imagery), although it’s safe to assume that it was probably a Moulinexspec 1.3 or something. Who cares? Doesn’t matter. For what resides in its place, in a bay now artfully smoothed and pepped up with a fresh coat of Irish green paint, is an ABF. And if that doesn’t mean anything to you, it’s the code of the 2.0-litre valver motor you’d usually expect to find inside a
    Mk3 GTI 16v, where it’d whistle out something on the amusing side of 150bhp. Dominic’s chosen to augment this with a set of slurping, gargling Jenvey throttle bodies too, with #KMS-management overseeing proceedings, so it’s safe to assume that peak power is somewhat elevated here within these salubrious surroundings. He’s seen fit to stuff in some spikier Cat Cams as well, along with a race-spec exhaust manifold, to feed into that original brief of somehow fusing the DTM with a grocery-spec granny-hatch. It shouldn’t work, but by thunder it does.

    Ah yes, and we were talking about the DTM, weren’t we? The relevance of that shall now all become clear – although, to be fair, we imagine you’ve already guessed: it’s staring out at you from beneath the arches. Yep, in a world of fake centre-lock caps on humdrum four-studs, Dominic’s gone all-in here with a quartet of genuine, bona fide, retro centre-lock race wheels. A set of Rennsportmafia adapters work with M72 nuts to ensure that our man’s now a dab hand with that comically large wheel spanner you see lying around pit garages, but that’s not all. This is no ordinary set of race rims, scavenged hungrily from eBay like so many others; no, these have a tale to tell. “These wheels have a real history,” Dominic enthuses. “They originally ran on Gerd Ruch’s DTM Mustang GT.” You see how it’s all tying up into a neat little package?

    “I had a pretty clear vision for how I wanted the car to turn out, right from the moment I got it,” he continues. “I visualised how it should be, Steffen Wiewel of Wiewel Motorsport helped with the engine conversion, and I worked hard over the course of six months to make it happen. That said, a lot of it happened more or less randomly; finding the car in itself was unexpected, then the wheels… a lot of it was down to luck. I’ve always been a fan of Ronal Racing rims, and I love the whole race wheel trend in the #VAG scene right now, so it was great to be able to buy a set of wheels I loved with true pedigree and a story behind them.”


    Of course, you can’t just slap on a set of wheels and let that be that, there’s the ever-present spectre of fitment that needs to be respected. In this case, Dominic went for an extraordinarily deep tuck, ramming those old-skool rollers way inside the arches and slathering them in just the merest suggestion of rubber, a simple and almost entirely invisible 165- section smidgeon, to ensure a slender delicacy that complements the purity of the small-bumpered ’83 (check out the sneaky way the wheels are built, too – “they’re 0” outside, 6.5” inside,” Dominic tells us with a wink). And naturally, given the retro vibe of the thing, this car’s rolling static – on H&R’s revered Deep coilovers, which do wonders to accentuate the spiralling kaleidoscope of tuck. And just for good measure, hashtag-because-racecar, Dominic’s hidden a set of G60 brakes in there, to haul up the popping, crackling aggression of that ABF in short order.

    This car, then, wears two distinct hats. One is that of a concours retro survivor, showcasing the simplicity of everyday West German motoring back before the Wall came down – it even has beaded seat covers, just like every single Berlin cabbie used to have. The other is a rather more boisterous and colourful hat, deliberately ruining the former’s affectation of ‘concours’ by fundamentally altering the car’s character: like a bodybuilder barely containing his muscles inside an unlikely woollen cardigan, it’s a race car hidden inside a little old lady’s shopping car. And that’s probably one of the coolest kinds of race car there is.

    We love the juxtaposition of the old lady-spec interior and screaming ITB’d ABF up front.
    This car also gave us a reason to use the word ‘juxtaposition’ too, so that’s nice…

    / #VW-Golf-II / #VW-Golf-Mk2 / #Volkswagen-Golf-Mk2 / #Volkswagen-Golf / #Volkswagen / #VW-Golf / #VW-Golf-Syncro-Mk2 / #VW-Typ-1G / #VW-Typ-19E / #Volkswagen-Golf-Typ-19E / #Volkswagen-Golf-II / #VW / #VW-Golf / #1983-Volkswagen-Golf / #Volkswagen-ABF /

    Dub Details #1983

    ENGINE: Rebuilt 2.0-litre 16v #ABF , #Jenvey throttle bodies, #KMS-ECU , #Cat-Cams, race- spec exhaust manifold

    CHASSIS: 6.5x17” #Ronal-Racing centre-locks, #Rennsportmafia adapters and M72 nuts, 165/35 Nankang Noble Sport NS20s, G60 brakes, #H&R Deep coilovers

    EXTERIOR: Original Irish green paint, engine bay smoothed and repainted

    INTERIOR: All original, beaded seat covers, Raid wood-rim steering wheel

    SHOUT: Steffen Wiewel from Wiewel Motorsport – without him the motor wouldn’t have been possible, Daniel Liedtke from OEM Equipped for parts supply, Jörg Ballermann for the supply of lips and screws, Alexander Kiefel from Rennsportmafia for the central locking adapters, Heiko Borchardt for help and tips for the conversion


    “love the Mk2 Golf, especially so I had to make it mine the early models”

    You know that ‘old’ smell that all early VWs seem to magically have? We bet this car smells amazing inside.
    6.5x17” Ronal Racing centre locks are actually from Gerd Ruch’s DTM Mustang GT race car from the late ‘80s. That is super, super cool.
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    RM Sotheby’s Duemila Ruote sale, 25-27 November / #BMW

    If you’re feeling adventurous towards the end of November may we suggest you hi-tail it across to Milan for RM Sotheby’s ‘Duemila Ruote’ (literal meaning: 2000 wheels) auction, the largest event of its kind ever hosted in Europe. On the weekend of 25 November, well over 430 cars will descend on Milan, Italy, to be offered entirely without reserve, alongside over 150 motorcycles, 60 boats, and hundreds of road bicycles and items of automobilia.

    The venue for this auction is the Fiera Milano exhibition centre, during the Milano AutoClassica, easily accessible from around the world with three international airports and situated within the heart of Italy’s most exciting travel destinations.

    As we went to press there were around ten BMWs listed and it’s worth remembering that everything on offer is being sold without reserve… so there could be some bargains to be had. Information on the specific vehicles was a little sparse but we think we can forgive RM Sotheby’s that at this stage, as compiling a catalogue for such a huge sale is quite some undertaking. Here are some of the lots we thought looked interesting…

    / #1987 / #BMW-E30 / #BMW-M3-E30 ESTIMATE €10,000-€12,000
    / #1983 / #BMW-E24 / #BMW-635CSi-ETCC-Group-A / #BMW-635CSi-ETCC-Group-A-E24 ESTIMATE €5000-€10,000
    / #1986 / #BMW-E24 / #BMW-M635CSi-E24 / ESTIMATE €10,000-€15,000
    / #1990 / #BMW-Z1 / ESTIMATE €30,000-€35,000
    / #1998 / #BMW-Z3-M-Coupé ESTIMATE €20,000-€30,000
    / #1987 E30 / #BMW-M3-Evo-E30 ESTIMATE €15,000-€20,000
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    SPORT QUATTRO REP GET SHORTY Slick #SWB rep packs 509bhp / Stunning, 500bhp replica

    SINGLE-MINDED

    This Lamborghini-coloured Sport #Quattro #replica has been transformed from rough and ready into a 509bhp, road-legal track toy.

    Celebrated automotive restoration and tuning outfit, Retropower, has long been recognised as a force for good that takes on projects that start with tired, broken and rotting vintage vehicles and end with glistening, modified and mechanically sound high-horsepower masterpieces. Needless to say, we were excited to hear that the latest fettled fourwheeler to roll out of the company’s Leicestershire workshop is wearing an Audi badge.

    The car in question is a #1983 quattro that at some point in the past had been subjected to short-wheel base chassis remodelling by renowned #Audi specialists, #Dialynx-Performance. The Swindonbased firm has been a supplier of aftermarket tuning components for turbocharged Audis since its inception in 1988, but Dialynx is perhaps best known for its many Sport quattro conversions.


    Developed for #Group-B rallying in the mid 1980s, the Sport quattro featured an all-alloy 2.1-litre 20-valve engine sat inside a lightweight body shell comprising carbon-Kevlar panels and a windscreen rake borrowed from the Audi 80. In order to get rid much of the bulk that the manufacturer deemed to be an obstacle when competing against the rally-ready chariots of rival car makers, the Sport’s chassis was made considerably shorter than that of the ‘regular’ wheelbase rally quattro that preceded it. This ditching of metal delivered reduced understeer, more responsive handling and quicker turning, while the large body panels allowed for the use of bigger wheels and an increased track width.

    A couple of hundred road-going Sport quattros were produced for homologation purposes, but buying one today will set you back a serious amount of dosh (over £100k), not to mention the horror of the associated running costs. This is where Dialynx Performance steps in – the company has transformed many factory quattros into Sport replicas over the years, resulting in what is claimed to be a car that is virtually indistinguishable from the model that it mimics.

    Furthermore, Dialynx says that its replicas offer lucky owners tameable levels of performance as opposed to the uncompromising aggression produced by genuine Group B belters.

    “I’m led to believe that the Audi that made its way into our workshop was the third quattro that Dialynx had converted to Sport spec,” recalls Retropower co-founder, Callum Seviour. “Sadly, time hadn’t been kind to the car, and we discovered a huge amount of work that needed to be done in order to bring it back to its best,” he says. The striking body kit applied to the race-inspired rep was just one of many areas in need of attention. That said, a cosmetic overhaul was all that the car’s owner was prepared to commission until he could be sure that Retropower’s work was of a standard that he was happy with.


    “I guess you could call it ‘testing the water’!” laughs Callum’s brother, Nat. “We stripped the car, treated it to new subframe mounting points, removed and replaced its roof, built a new supporting roof frame, double-skinned its chassis legs, restored its body panels and bonded the corrected wide-arch kit into place before covering every part in a coat of primer. We were about to follow up with a lick of sparkling grey lifted from the Lamborghini colour catalogue when the quattro’s owner signalled his approval for us to start a long list of mechanical upgrades!” he confirms.

    Ordinarily, Retropower would take care of any spanner wizardry and/or fabrication work that needed to be carried out on one of its customer’s cars before tackling aesthetic updates, but the instruction that it was given with regard to the Audi forced the Seviour boys to work in an unorthodox manner. “The car’s owner was thrilled with the revitalised appearance of his ride,” continues Callum. “This gave us the green light to strip and rebuild the 2.2-litre ‘RR’ five-cylinder powerplant that sits beneath the vented bonnet up-front, although requested modifications that included a relocation of the engine’s cooling system and a boot-mounted dry sump kit forced us to cut away at metal that we’d only just prepared for paint!” he groans. Nevertheless, the 20-valve lump was carefully inspected before a period of planning that would transform it into an absolute monster. Not that the work involved in achieving such a feat was as easy as we might have made it sound...

    The car’s inline-five had suffered severe mechanical failure at some point in the recent past following work that a third party had undertaken on behalf of the owner. Subsequently repaired under warranty, the revised nuts and bolts were supposed to be producing in excess of 500bhp, but the condition and performance of the engine that Retropower were asked to work with casts doubt over that figure. Indeed, a sump populated by metal particles, a cracked cylinder head, a weeping head gasket, worn bearings and a mismatched piston that was making contact with a valve face all pointed towards what can be politely labelled as a ‘bodge’, and that’s without mentioning the serious lack of grunt that the car was producing under load.

    “We reground the engine’s billet crankshaft, machined all piston pockets so that they matched one another, and we sourced a new head before enlarging and smoothing its ports,” Callum tells us. As many original parts were retained as possible, with CNC polishing and restoration being employed to ensure the continued use of expensive equipment that was considered to be perfectly serviceable, while fuelling upgrades included twin Bosch high-flow pumps and 1000cc #ASNU-injectors .

    A Wagner Tuning inlet manifold and a chunky #Garrett GT40 turbocharger were called upon to work alongside a side-exit stainless steel exhaust system in the airflow department. Routing of the custom pipework demanded significant modifying of the Audi’s floor. Further metalwork involved the creation of a custom rear bulkhead and channelling for water pipes that travel the length of the car and back now that its cooling and lubrication systems sit in its boot space.

    A roll cage was already present, but door bars and diagonals were literally left hanging. “We were shocked to see that such an important safety device was so poorly fitted inside the car!” gasps Callum. “To counter this worrying discovery, we fabricated a comprehensive multi-point cage that travels through the dashboard, triangulates and attaches itself to key structural components throughout the chassis,” he explains.

    Talking of which, suspension and braking upgrades were already evident in the form of modified struts (to allow for coilovers) and braces, Koni damper inserts and Tarox six-pot stoppers, yet the Retropower touch bettered these key features thanks to the appointment of SuperPro polybushes and a Wilwood pedal box. The latter inhabits a cabin that also boasts Recaro Pole Position buckets, a flocked dash, Stack gauges and an SPA KitDash that occupies space once reserved for standard quattro clocks.

    Even though the completed car is used as a track toy, it remains road legal. This surprising fact meant that its owner wanted a show-quality finish to what is essentially a motorsport body kit. To that end, masses of effort went into filling and block-sanding what would otherwise be “ripply” panels before the Lambo paint was finally splashed across the flawless build.

    Azev A wheels coated in a similar shade were already in place when the Audi arrived at the Retropower workshop, unlike this awesome VAG machine’s current power output. “I’m delighted to be able to say that the car is now producing over 500bhp following the huge amount of time and effort that my team has spent on the project,” beams Callum. He’s being typically modest; despite a dyno printout displaying an impressive 509bhp and 410lb per foot of torque (delivered by a custom map on a MoTeC M48 ECU), this fantastic four-wheel drive pocket rocket has the potential to knock on the door of 600bhp if its owner ever fancies investing in a transmission upgrade.

    In the meantime, running a powerful engine well below its top end abilities should result in a safe, reliable delivery of ponies both on and off the track. Retropower, we salute you!

    SPECIFICATION #Audi-Sport-Quattro-replica / #Audi-Sport-quattro / #Audi-Quattro / #Audi / #MoTeC-M48 / #Motec / #MoTec-ECU

    Engine: 2.2-litre I5 20-valve DOHC ‘RR’, steel crankshaft, forged connecting rods and pistons, enlarged and smoothed cylinder head ports, combustion chambers reshaped and cc matched, standard camshafts, standard valvetrain, custom dry sump system, dry sump located in boot, radiator and twin slimline fans relocated to boot space, electric water pump and controller, #ASH silicone hoses and tubes, twin #Bosch-044 fuel pumps, #ASNU 1000cc fuel injectors, alloy fuel cell, MoTeC M48 ECU with single-channel capacitor discharge ignition, #Wagner-Tuning inlet manifold, #Garrett-GT40 turbocharger, custom side-exit exhaust system, #Varley race battery, custom wiring loom.

    Performance: 509bhp @ 7050rpm, 410lb/ft torque @ 5800rpm
    Transmission: Standard quattro five-speed manual gearbox, quick shifter
    Suspension: Standard struts modified with coilover conversion for adjustable ride height, Koni damper inserts, SuperPro polybushes throughout

    Brakes: Tarox six-piston front calipers, Audi RS4 rear calipers, Sport quattro discs, Ferodo DS3000 pads, Wilwood pendulum bias pedal box

    Wheels: 8x16in #Azev A five-spokes, Toyo Proxes R888 225/45x16 tyres

    Exterior: #Dialynx-Performance shortened quattro shell, replica Sport quattro enlarged body kit, modified floor for exhaust and coolant pipes, full respray in Lamborghini Grigio Estoque

    Interior: Fully stripped, #Recaro-Pole-Position bucket seats, custom multi-point roll cage, fuel and oil lines throughout cabin, electro-hydraulic power steering pump positioned behind driver seat, battery positioned behind passenger seat, flocked dashboard, SPA KitDash, electric water pump ECU mounted on dashboard, aluminium false front floor panels, all new wiring, steering column stalk deletion, custom switch panel, Stack gauges, start button and kill switches

    Thanks: Callum and the team at Retropower www.retropower.co.uk

    Top: Moody front end shot.
    Above: Flocked interior and lots of custom switches Below: Looks fantastic side-on.
    Above: That iconic front end Right: the 5-cylinder powerhouse Below: It’s all in the details.
    Above: Bumper cut out for air flow.
    Below: Slimlime rads moved to the boot.

    “We sourced a new head before enlarging and smoothing its ports”
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    MILLTEK SPORT MB QUATTRO CLASSIC AUDIS – MILLTEK MB QUATTRO PHOTOS: NEIL BIRKITT (WITH THANKS TO LEIGH RAVEY AND KENNY LONGDON) / #Audi-Ur-quattro / #Audi-Quattro / #Audi-Ur-Quattro-Milltek / #Audi-Quattro-Milltek / #Audi-Milltek / #Milltek / #2016


    Milltek’s new exhaust system for the classic #Audi Ur #Quattro sounds simply sensational, but first they had to find a suitable example to fit it to…

    ‘The new #Milltek-Classic-exhaust-system offers great performance, exceptional fit and finish and a perfectly-judged sound enhancement...’

    There can be few features about the Ur quattro that don’t make reference to its unique combination of engine sound and exhaust note – the distinctive warbling, skirling off-beat cacophany that arises from the unusual 1-2-4-5-3 firing order of the turbocharged in-line five-cylinder engine.

    It’s the stuff of legend, with just about every quattro enthusiast having a story to tell of how, as a child or teenager, they were spellbound while watching the works rally cars charge through the Welsh forests, spitting gravel and flames in equal proportions…

    Those same impressionable youngsters are all grown up now and many have gone on to become quattro owners and enthusiasts (can there be anyone who’s an owner who isn’t an enthusiast?) Indeed, the Ur quattro now ranks among the most iconic of classic cars from that early Eighties era – uncommon enough to be very special, but not so rare and expensive as to be unobtainable – and the enthusiasm for the model remains undiminished.

    As a born again high-performance classic car it still looks fabulous and remains practical even today, still able to hold its own in the cut and thrust of modern motoring and likely to attract just as much attention in the pub car park as many expensive supercars.

    So it was no real surprise that, when the renowned exhaust specialist #Milltek-Sport launched a new initiative to produce a range of high-quality high-performance exhaust systems for the classic car market, the Ur quattro would be one of the first on their applications list.

    Although Milltek is known mostly for its extensive range of applications for the latest high-performance models, with the Volkswagen Group playing a huge part in its portfolio, the company has a long history that goes way back to the times when cars like the quattro were just emerging.


    Milltek’s founder, #Phil-Millington , began his long experience in the exhaust industry as manager of one of the country’s first exhaust centres in 1977 before taking over the running of a stainless-steel exhaust specialist in Devon, and then founding his own business – #Falcon-Exhausts – in #1983 , just about the time that the quattro was making its mark here in the UK market, the first time around.

    So, there was already a lot of experience in producing exhaust systems for a wide range of models that were contemporary at the time, but which are now the mainstay of the current classic car market. But it was never going to be a simple case of dusting off the original blueprints from the archives and reproducing the old systems. Although a high quality of construction had always been a strong point for the Falcon systems, there were also many ways in which Milltek’s latest advanced construction techniques and modern materials could be used to improve upon the design and manufacture.

    With the decision made to use an Audi Ur quattro as one of the first demo cars for the new initiative, the guys at Milltek set about finding a suitable example for long-term development and testing of the new revised system and for subsequent promotional purposes. And, let’s face it, who wouldn’t jump at the chance to own a quattro!

    After a bit of searching around, in August 2014 they sourced a suitable example, a #1988 model with the later spec 2.2-litre 10-valve #MB-turbo-engine . Finished in gleaming Alpine white – a colour which, after Tornado red perhaps, has to be one of the classic signatures for the Ur quattro – as soon as they saw it they knew it just had to be added to the Milltek fleet. Ironically, it was already fitted with an aftermarket stainless-steel exhaust, manufactured by a rival brand, but that didn’t put them off!

    Although very solid at first sight – indeed, it was widely admired when it first appeared on the Milltek Sport stand at Audi Driver International in October 2014 – perhaps inevitably, when they delved a bit deeper, it was found to need some bodywork restoration, and that task was entrusted to Simon Norman at 2Refinish, based in Hinckley, Leicestershire.

    A very thorough and top quality exercise followed throughout the early months of 2015, with the bodywork completely stripped and overhauled and treated to a glass-out respray, before it next appeared on the Milltek stand at the Classic Motor Show at the NEC , to be much admired and featured in our November issue.

    Of course, like any classic car of its age, there were also quite a few mechanical gremlins to be ironed out. Milltek’s Leigh Ravey tells us that he’s now picked up quite a bit of practical experience at troubleshooting the old K-Jetronic injection system and dealing with many of the idiosyncrasies of the older cars, none of which involve modern diagnostic techniques like reading fault codes…

    For instance, recalling a recurrent problem with the brake pedal switch and wiring that was shorting out, causing the brake lights to be on permanently, and dealing with an intermittently troublesome idle control valve, Leigh philosophically regards it as ‘the joys of old cars, I suppose!’

    The car now also has a new set of Bilstein dampers, H&R lowering springs, Powerflex bushes and, of course, its piéce de résistance – the new Milltek Classic exhaust system which, in their own words, is claimed to ‘offer great performance gains, exceptional fit and finish, a powerful but perfectlyjudged sound enhancement and a look that’s close to the original exhaust system but subtly enhanced, remaining faithful to the car’s iconic design’…


    This particular system is the louder non-resonated ‘downpipe-back’ application, which uses a 10V adapter pipe, connecting pipe, centre silencer bypass assembly, rear silencer assembly and polished tailpipe tips. The systems are also available in a slightly more restrained / subdued resonated form, and with other tailpipe assemblies, which include Titanium and Cerakote finishes as well as polished tips.

    As well as using top quality construction, with Type-304 aircraft grade 2.5-inch diameter (63.5 mm) stainless-steel pipework, mandrel-bent for optimum gasflow to ensure maximum performance throughout the rev-range, Milltek’s development engineers also took the opportunity to solve one of the original system’s weak points by adding a new mounting point.

    Although it requires drilling four holes in the boot floor to accommodate the new mounting, this is well worthwhile. It not only solves the age-old problem of the drooping rear silencer with its typically sagging tailpipes that no longer sit neatly in the aperture in the rear valance, but it also dramatically reduces movement of the rear silencer when cornering.

    The opportunity was also taken to revise the routeing of the pipework over the rear axle to ensure that no contact is made, preventing any chafing of the pipework itself as well as keeping exhaust heat away from the CV joint.

    Milltek Classic has also completed development of a version for the later 20V models; otherwise identical to the 10V version, it uses a different front adapter pipe. So, was it all worth it, given that there’s already plenty of aftermarket stainlesssteel exhaust systems available for the Ur quattro… Let’s just say that, while hanging out of the window of the camera car to get the driving shots for this feature, I just wish that there had been a way to capture and bottle the glorious sound that emanates from this exhaust system as the Milltek quattro accelerated and cruised past at 70 mph – it’d be a best-seller!

    Contacts Milltek Sport Unit 3 Victoria Way, Pride Park , Derby DE24 8AN Tel: 01332 227 280 / www.millteksport.com
    2Refinish Unit 35, Sketchley Meadows Ind. Estate, Hinckley, Leicetershire LE10 3ES Tel: 07885 674 484

    www.2refinish.com

    ‘ I just wish that there had been a way to capture and bottle the + glorious sound that emanates from this exhaust system...’


    ‘A very thorough and top quality exercise followed throughout the early months of 2015, with the bodywork completely stripped and overhauled and treated to a glass-out respray...’

    ‘After a bit of searching around, in August 2014 they sourced a suitable example, a 1988 model with the later spec 2.2-litre 10-valve MB turbo engine...’

    ‘So it was no real surprise that the Ur quattro would be one of the first on the applications list...’
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    Immaculate, minimal-mile #Ford-Sierra-XR4 is will be heading to £20k soon’ / #Ford-Sierra / #Ford / #1983 / #Ford-Sierra-XR4i


    With Eighties hot Ford values still exploding we should look at the unregarded 1983 to 1985 Sierra XR4i. The DVLA only has 164 registered compared to 928 RS Cosworth Sierras, making the XR4i a very rare fast Ford. And they’re anything but dull.

    The Granada 2.8 V6 pulls strongly with 0-60 in 8.0 seconds and at the 1983 press launch one road-tester saw 137mph. With TV ads shot in California and a Chariots of Fire soundtrack this was a big deal for Ford.

    New list was £9170 but £1000 discounts were the norm because buyer resistance to the controversial Sierra silhouette, a threedoor- only spec, biplane rear wing and fiddly three-quarter rear window treatment meant that in its first critical year only 4508 XR4is were sold in the UK. But there are signs of growing interest, with Streben Ltd of Stokeon- Trent offering a one-owner 60k black ’84 for £10,000 while a private seller in Sussex has a Caspian Blue Y-plater with a plausible 29,000 miles for £6995.

    With such low survival numbers, snapping up one of the few remaining mint XR4is now would be a shrewd move before enthusiasts and dealers hoover them all up. The later and less dramatic XR4x4 doesn’t have the same purity and innocence of the early cars and if you come across any ’83 XR4is with registration prefixes JVX, GJN or JNO they’re likely Ford press office launch cars and highly desirable.

    The Cologne V6 is strong and long-lived, PAS is essential and options like aircon, heated seats and trip computer add value. Factory-spec original cars are the most wanted and I won’t be surprised to see immaculate and original minimal milers heading towards £20k soon. But the perennial problem with all these massproduced Eighties icons is that we neglected and discarded them in huge numbers. I once sold a perfect 22k-mile Glacier White XR4i on an A-plate for just £3250 – and that was over book money. How times have changed.
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    PC RESTORATION SHOW, NEC, BIRMINGHAM / #Lamborghini-Countach / #Lamborghini / #1983 /

    Restored Countach stars. This #Lamborghini-Countach-5000S was one of the highlights at the Practical Classics Restoration & Classic Cars show at the NEC in March. The car – featured – was seriously damaged by fire and has been restored by Ferrari specialist Terry Keys and his sons Tom and Jamie. ‘The Weber carburettors had melted,’ said Terry, giving an idea of the carnage. ‘Molten aluminium had poured down the engine’s inlet ports.

    Read the full amazing story of this Countach’s restoration.
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    RACE RETRO, STONELEIGH
    Turbo charges into Stoneleigh

    1981 RENAULT 5 TURBO

    The #Renault-5-Turbo that crashed out of the #1983-Monte-Carlo-Rally in mysterious circumstances has returned to a rally stage for the first time since the Eighties.

    ‘It probably won more rallies than any other 5 Turbo,’ said restorer Kevin Jones of GTO Engineering. ‘It was the first 5 Turbo imported into the UK and the first to be rallied by a British driver. John Price easily won the Motoring News British Rally Championship with it in 1982, so he targeted a number of European events – including the Monte Carlo rally – the following year.

    ‘He was sponsored by a Renault dealership and had works backing, but as a privateer was seeded 60th. Unexpectedly, he overshadowed the works Renault drivers by putting in some incredible times and was gaining on the leaders when he suddenly shot off the road and down a ravine. ‘When he got the car back to the UK he found a bullet hole in one of the tyres. He never found out who fired it – it could have been a disgruntled local or even a rival team.

    ‘He sold it in 1987 to a guy who dismantled it but didn’t do anything to it. We bought it eight years ago and restored it but we’ve only just got the engine running – all 320bhp of it.’

    This Renault-5-Turbo was taken out of the #1983 #Monte-Carlo-Rally by a sniper’s bullet. / #Renault-5 / #Renault /
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