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    Behind The Scenes On Our 1969 #Porsche 911 T Film

    / #1969-Porsche-911T / #1969 / #Porsche-911T / #Porsche-911

    Each week, with every one of our films, our goal is to bring you not only the cars you love, but the kinds of stories that speak to our shared interests from an individual’s perspective. This week we join an old favorite in the form of this 1969 911 T as we follow Kurht Gerhardt through his favorite driving spots during Los Angeles’ early hours.

    After a stint owning some classic Italian steel, Kurht decided that he wanted to hang onto the romance of the vintage experience, but in a package that was altogether more reliable and decidedly easier to find parts and service options for. “I wanted something that was efficient, and that ran right, and that I could get into and just drive.”


    An early 901 Porsche fit the criteria, and so he bought two. It might sound strange to label this one-to-two car swap as an instance of reduction, but looking past the size of the garage space required that’s just what’s happened here. The 911, and the T, or Touring, model especially so, is a very simple car. It’s not fitted with extra functionality or many amenities to dilute the driving feel and feedback provided in such a lightweight and focused sports car. This holds true for all early 901 chassis, but it’s the T that’s the most stripped-down model in the range, and arguably the most pleasurable experience because of it.


    It’s every bit as quick as he needs it to be, and outside of an R, the T can be considered the Porsche that’s been reduced to the maximum degree — not in the sense of loss in the negative though, but rather that its simplicity adds to the driving characteristics and overall temperament by way of not getting in the way; the T channels a level of purity, of unrefined Porsche personality.

    So what does Kurht do to take advantage of this? “One of my favorite things to do is to get up at like six, seven o’clock in the morning on a Sunday.” Living in LA, these early morning weekend hours are the most opportune time to have the weave of the city streets all to yourself, and as you can see in the film, Kurht makes good use of the space available in the first hours of light. It’s a time when the city is still quiet, and the urban and mountain roads alike can offer their true potential to the drivers who seek it.

    He also plans to participate in the Peking to Paris race in 2019, taking the dizzying 8,500-mile route as an opportunity to live out a dream of his. “I can’t wait to get out in the Porsche and camp and just rough it,” he says, “being out in the middle of nowhere for six weeks, it’s going to be an amazing adventure.”

    In the meantime though, he will continue driving the snot out of this sweet piece of Porsche history, and it’s a plan he has stretched out into the furthest future too; “It’s something I want to keep for life because it’s such a solid car. No matter what, it just keeps on running, and you can beat it up a bit and you can haul ass and it still does great. It starts up every day.”

    This is how you use a classic car and wring the most out of it, this is how you Drive Tastefully.
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    Belt up, kids

    OWNER: Mark Sommer

    CAR: #1969-Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Saloon / #1969 / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Saloon / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Type-105 / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia / #Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Saloon-Type-105 / #Alfa-Romeo /

    One of the reasons I bought my Alfa was so the whole family could enjoy it. Now that it’s back in the UK, the first job was to have seatbelts fitted, both in the front and, more importantly, the back, so that my sons (seven and nine) can travel in their car seats.

    Quickfit Safety Belt Service, this year celebrating 55 years in the business, is based in Middlesex. They were recomended by a few people I knew who had used them for their classic cars. Sales manager Pawel helped me decide on the best belts for my car: it would have to be inertia-reel type in the rear for the boys, and I decided to go for those in the front too, opting for comfort and security over period appeal.

    Although they have a large selection of coloured webbing and lots of finishes for the clasps, I decided to go for simple black webbing and black plastic clasps, which would suit the simple, mainly black trim of the Giulia best.

    I travelled up to Middlesex with my father-in-law David, arriving first thing as fitting would take at least six hours and I wanted to drive the car back home that day.

    Pawel ushered me into the workshop, next to an #Alfa-Romeo-SZ that had just had a rear seat fitted, to make it a 2+2, and a Bentley Continental that was also being fitted with seatbelts.

    While my car was being stripped out, Pawel showed us around the premises, including the sewing room where belts are made on the day of fitment, after trim has been removed, to ensure they fit correctly. It was decided that the rear belts should be installed through the boot onto the rear parcel shelf, and the fronts simply fixed onto the floor beside the seats.

    David and I took off for a visit to the Hendon RAF museum, just a short taxi ride away, and returned to find the Alfa ready to drive home – fully equipped with its latest modification. The seatbelts didn’t look out of place and I couldn’t resist taking the family out when I got home – in complete safety.

    THANKS TO Quickfit Safety Belt Service, www.quickfitsbs.com

    From top Mark’s Giulia in Quickfit workshop with SZ and Continental; rear seat removed to make way for fitting; choice of webbing and clasps; the finished article.
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    Jaguar XJ6 S1’s out of the basement but still a bargain

    / #1969 / #Jaguar-XJ6-Series-1 / #Jaguar-XJ12-Series-1 / #Jaguar-XJ-Series-1 / #Jaguar-XJ / #Jaguar / #Jaguar-XJ6 / #Jaguar-XJ12 / #2018

    Prices have been moving up nicely for the early Jaguar XJ6. Time was you could by a good ‘1969 XJ for £7k but fine original low-mileage cars are now approaching the £20k threshold, as buyers understand that a professional restoration comes with a £120k bill.

    Pembrokeshire Classic Investments in Wales has a superb 22,000-mile ’1972 4.2 auto in Old English White with all books, manuals and tools for £18,995, while the Classic Car Warehouse in Blackburn has another very original ’1972 4.2 auto with 48,000 and two owners for £15,995. Back in 2012 Silverstone sold a perfect ’1969 4.2 with 13,000 miles for £24,640 – that car is worth £40k now. Those first XJs cost a bargain £2592 and were plush, fast and smooth but you had to wait a year for delivery. Road testers raved and in ’1968 it scooped the Car of the Year Award. Launch year cars carry a premium with their silver-rimmed gauges, body-coloured wheels and rear reflectors in the reversing lights, but only a handful survive.

    The Jaguar XJ6 ushered in a new era of luxury car dominance with Mercedes-beating silence, speed and technological refinement for £1000 less than an S-Class. The 4.2s feel more urgent than 2.8s and although manual XJs are more rare, the Borg Warner self-shifter is much more waftable. Daimler versions are worth 20% more but are harder to find. Even tatty projects are now running at £3-£5k but seek out the best you can find. Given the current six-figure restorations costs a fine Series 1 XJ at less than £20k is a resounding bargain – just like it was back in 1968.

    VALUE 2012 £6750
    VALUE NOW 2018 £11K
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    / #1969-Citroen-DS21-Decapotable / #Citroen-DS21-Decapotable / #Citroen-DS21 / #Citroen-DS / #Citroen / #1969
    £162,247 #Bonhams , September 10 / #Citroen-DS21-Cabriolet

    With only around 100 built, #Chapron ’s DS Decap is an elusive great – the most desirable version of a car that’s already a motoring icon, which explains why they’ll always cost ive times as much as a saloon. This two-owner car had never been rusty and wore its leather seat creases with pride. It’ll garner more admiration from fellow enthusiasts than trophies, but is probably the better for that. A true connoisseur’s car.
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