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    Fuel me twice
    Car: 1950 Ford Club Coupe
    Owner: Delwyn Mallett

    / #1950-Ford-Club-Coupe / #1950 / #Ford-Club-Coupe / #Ford-Club / #Ford

    With the Weather improving I rang a local chum, James, to see if he fancied a V8 trip to the Barley Mow – me in my 1950 flathead Ford and him in his hemi-headed Daimler. As the Barley Mow is only two miles from my home, if slightly further for James, this was less a major day out than a chance to park the cars outside and sip a pint in the sunshine while we admired (or not) our respective steeds.

    As I may have mentioned in previous Ford updates, among other problems it’s displaying a voracious appetite for fuel. Its consumption seems to be way off the scale and down in single figures. Unfortunately the fuel gauge doesn’t work – it was the only item that refused to respond after I had the car rewired and converted from 6 to 12 volts. I always carry a container or two of fuel as a precaution, and before setting out I glanced in the back to make sure they were aboard. Glancing, however, should have been accompanied by lifting.

    Having enjoyed our interlude we set out on the return leg. A mile from home the Ford spluttered and died, retaining just enough momentum to coast onto the grass verge. Incredulous that once again I had contrived to run out of fuel, I reached for my spare cans. Empty, of course. Both of them.

    Fortunately James, who had sped off into the distance, noticed my absence from his rear-view mirror and backtracked. After a mercy mission to the nearest petrol station, James returned and I was soon back on the tarmac.
    Then, to add insult to injury, by the time I reached home the engine was once again running strangely. With the hood up (it’s an American car), a quick glance revealed that the accelerator linkage had fallen off one of the carbs – it sports twin carburettors on a Fenton manifold – so only one of them was doing the bidding of the accelerator pedal.

    In the March issue, I mentioned how lucky I was that, when a tiny nut fell off the carburettor linkage of my ‘Goccia’ Abarth, it had travelled but a few inches and lodged itself in the rim of the rocker cover. No such luck this time. The threaded plug that screws into the end of the linking rod, and locks it to the ball end on the carb lever, was gone. Close inspection revealed a series of holes for a split pin that the previous hot-rodder omitted to fit. A short length of wire has provided a temporary and somewhat wobbly fix – or bodge, as it’s known in the trade.

    Meanwhile I’ve also rigged a temporary petrol tank so that I can measure accurately how few miles to the gallon I’m getting. Establishing the reason may take a little longer.

    Top and above Linkage’s retaining plug had fallen out, rendering one carburettor inoperative; temporary tank helps mpg measurement.
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  • Post is under moderation
    The Shoebox saga continues

    CAR: #1950-Ford-Club-Coupe / #1950 / #Ford-Club-Coupe / #Ford-Club

    OWNER: Delwyn Mallett

    A refresher since my last 1950 ‘ #Shoebox#Ford-Shoebox update, which I’m startled to realise was some two years ago.

    As related in my previous report, the task at hand has never been a restoration as such but merely to get the beast road-legal and reliable. With that as the brief, the ’Box was delivered to Hampshire specialist Roy Pitter, of Rods and Restorations, where the first task – on safety grounds and at Roy’s insistence – was a total rewire using a modern, off-the-shelf ‘street rod’ loom.

    The car arrived in this country on a set of totally inappropriate cheapo #BBS replica wheels, which have now been jettisoned in favour of a set of ‘steelies’, wider-rimmed than original and custom-built with sufficient offset (inset?) to allow fatter tyres to fit without fouling the low-cut rear ’arches. Playing with the wheels inevitably led to renewing the brake system, with a new master cylinder and slave cylinders. All available off-the- American-shelf at a refreshingly low price in comparison to buying similar parts for a European classic. The frankly awful accelerator pedal, little more than a piece of stamped tin on a rubber ‘hinge’, has also been replaced with a new and much more substantial device.

    With much time spent viewing the car from ground level and lower, it was decided that the sills ought to be replaced and a set of panels were ordered from the States and grafted in. A small area of rust in the passenger’s footwell was also cut out and replaced, and I raised quite a few blisters on my hand after deciding to scrape off the concrete-like sound-deadening on the cabin floor. The car might now be noisier inside – I’ve yet to find out – but it will certainly be many pounds lighter, and, after all, it’s a ’Rod so noisy is good.

    I tempted fate in my last report by saying that the engine was running sweetly. With the 2015 Pendine Sands Hot Rod Races targeted as a deadline and rapidly approaching, a leaky carb (one of the two fitted on the Fenton manifold) was dispatched to a specialist and rebuilt virtually overnight as a rush job. Phew, almost there! But then I fell at the last fence…

    A misfire and a lack of compression on one cylinder, which consultation with the Flathead boys predicted was almost certainly caused by failed piston rings, caused me also to suffer a compression failure and I abandoned the mission. It’s now Pendine 2016 or bust. More very soon.

    Right New metal where it was needed, then off to Pendine with the engine ‘running sweetly’. Only it was not to be…
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  • Post is under moderation
    Delwyn Mallett
    Delwyn Mallett created a new group Ford Club Coupe
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