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    LOTUS ELISE RACE 250 – MOST ACCOMPLISHED ELISE RACER YET FROM HETHEL / #Lotus-Elise-Race-250 / #Lotus-Elise / #Lotus / #2017 / #Lotus-Elise-250-Cup


    Hailed as ‘the Most accomplished Elise racer yet from Hethel’ in amongst the luminaries of Lotus’ fine offerings, the new Lotus Elise Race 250 distils the famous company’s engineering expertise into one hardcore, track-orientated package. The arrival of the new Elise Race 250 coincides with the 50th celebrations for the founding of the famous factory in Hethel, Norfolk, when in 1966, founder Colin Chapman moved Lotus to the purpose-built facility. Today, all Lotus cars are developed on the same test track responsible for the company’s famous Grand Prix racers.

    Eligible for many race series around the world, this sensational new Elise has been developed to meet the high demands of the track, with a raft of performance-orientated features as standard. Packing a supercharged, 1.8-litre 4-cylinder engine with a 6 speed manual gearbox, the Elise Race 250 boasts 243 hp (246 PS) at 7200 rpm and an impressive 250 Nm of torque between 3500 rpm and 5500 rpm.

    Delivering a level of ability you’d expect from one of the world’s most famous racing marques, every aspect of the Lotus Elise Race 250 has been optimized to help slash lap times. This covers track-oriented features including Nitron adjustable dampers, uprated brake pads, FIA approved carbon fibre race seat with sixpoint racing harness, a removable steering wheel and a polycarbonate rear windscreen.


    The Lotus Elise Race 250 also features a full aero package, including front splitter, rear diffuser, floor extensions and a rear wing. As a result, the car’s design generates substantial downforce, equal to 66 kg at 100 mph and 155 kg at maximum speed of 154 mph (248 km/h).
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    Lester Dizon
    DRIVEN / #Lotus-Elise-20th-Anniversary-special-edition / Words and photos by Lester Dizon / #Lotus-Elise / #Lotus / #2016 / #Lotus-Elise-20th-Anniversary

    SPECIFICATIONS
    Vehicle type Mid-engine, RWD, 2-passenger, 2-door sports car
    Price P3,870,000.00
    Engine type Liquid-cooled DOHC 16-valve inline-4
    Displacement : 1800cc
    Power 217hp @ 6800rpm
    Torque 250Nm @ 4600rpm
    Transmission 6-speed manual
    Wheelbase 2300mm
    Length 3726mm
    Width 1719mm
    Height 1117mm
    Curb weight 914kg
    Wheels and tires 16” front 17” rear lightweight cast alloys 175/55ZR16 front 225/45ZR17 rear

    COMPANY INFO
    Lotus Cars Manila Blk. 15, 32nd St., cor. Rizal Drive, Crescent Park West, Bonifacio Global City, Taguig
    City, Philippines 1634 Tel. No.: (+632) 860-8888
    E-mail: info@lotuscarsmanila.com
    Website: www.lotuscarsmanila.com

    It is written in Greek mythology that eating a lotus, which is considered narcotic, will cause people to sleep in peaceful apathy and live carelessly as if time slows down just for them. If eating a lotus makes one immune to the worries of the world, will driving a Lotus make one immune to the worries on the road?

    This philosophical question was buzzing in my head as I got into the new Lotus Elise 20th Anniversary Special Edition for a short fun drive around the Clark International Speedway. Getting into the Elise is a test of one’s agility and level of fitness but, after contorting my body into the tight cabin, the interior provides a safe cozy cocoon to attack the curves.

    The mid-engine Elise debuted in the 1995 Frankfurt Motor Show debut and the yellow 1.8-litre supercharged model celebrates the 20 years of the model’s existence and replaces the Elise S Club Racer in the Lotus model line-up. Fitted with the same four-cylinder engine as the Elise S, the 20th Anniversary model produces 217 horsepower and 250 Newton-meters of torque as the Elise S. Fitted with a close ratio six-speed manual gearbox, this Elise only takes 4.6 second to go from zero to 100 km/h (0-62MPH) and it can reach a top speed of 232 km/h.

    Around the Clark speedway, the Elise is a well-balanced, lightweight track car that has an almost 50-50 weight distribution, which places its center-of-gravity in the middle of the car. Turn into a tight corner with a bit too much speed and you will feel the car’s equilibrium swing around the driver’s seat as the four tire contact patches try to maintain their grip on the road surface. Lotus shredded 10 kilograms from the Elise S’s 924kg weight by fitting lighter forged alloy wheels, center console and leather sports seats, and these help it fight the laws of physics.

    Moreover, its track-focused suspension settings and new sport mode that alters the car’s mapping to improve throttle response and slacken the traction control, which helps restore control in situations like these. The Lotus was saved from veering off the track and cutting into the grass, and it made mere mortals like me drive like racing demigods. Our time around the entire circuit was decisively quick but the time inside the Elise seemed to have distinctively slowed down like I was in a controlled trance.

    The test Elise 20th Anniversary Special Edition I drove came with a matte black rear diffuser, wing mirrors, roll loop, and rear transom that contrasted the bright yellow paint. According to the factory, fuel mileage is estimated at around 20 kilometers per liter in combined city and highway driving while emission is low at only 173g/km of CO2. Of course, driving a low Lotus in the grueling Metro Manila traffic is not for the faint hearted.

    Jean-Marc Gales, CEO of Group Lotus PLC, was quoted as proudly saying, “Over the years, we have improved and refined the Elise, but we have also ensured that we have retained the purity of the driving experience. The Elise remains as the sports car to which other brands aspire.” His bold statement is based on the fact that over 32,000 Elise models have been sold in the past 20 years.

    Lotus, the car company, has been through some tough times during the last two decades, yet it has managed to build some of the best sports cars that money can buy. Perhaps eating a narcotic lotus and making time slow down so you can live a carefree life is not such a bad thing after all.

    “Over the years, we have improved and refined the Elise, but we have also ensured that we have retained the purity of the driving experience. the Elise remains as the sports car to which other brands aspire." – Jean-Marc Gales, CEO of Group Lotus PLC
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    Just added lightness / IGNITION / New Cars / #Lotus-Elise-250-Cup / #Lotus-Elise / #Lotus / #2016 /

    Shaving weight and boosting torque land the Lotus Elise 250 Cup at the top of the track day heap. Words Steve Sutcliffe. Photography Pete Gibson.

    Focused minimalism is the phrase coined by Lotus to describe the intent behind its new Elise 250 Cup road racer. And, for once, the hyperbole fits the description of what Hethel’s engineers have done to the car.

    The 250 is lighter (931kg with fluids), faster, more powerful and more torquey than the 220 Cup it supersedes. In the process it becomes the fastest production Elise there has ever been, with a 0-60mph time of just 3.9sec and a top speed of 154mph, or a still impressive – if slightly windy – 149mph with the new removable soft-top stored in the boot.

    Also new are a set of super-sticky Yokohama trackday tyres that are still perfectly usable on the road in the wet, claims Lotus chassis guru Gavan Kershaw. ‘It’s almost got too much grip for its own good,’ he admits with a knowing smile. Which explains why, in his hands, the car has lapped the test track at Hethel only a couple of seconds slower than the far more powerful, far more expensive Evora 400.

    Such mighty ability against the stopwatch doesn’t come especially cheap, however. In standard trim the 250 Cup costs £45,600. Add the very lovely carbon pack that was fitted to the test car (front splitter, sills and the huge diffuser at the rear were all in carbon) and the price rises to within a whisker of £50,000.

    And that puts the pared-down, lightweight Elise deep into Porsche Cayman territory. That said, the Elise is such a different prospect that you’d doubt whether anyone thinking of buying one of these two would seriously consider the other. The Elise is a proper trackday weapon, a car you can easily endure on your way to a circuit (it’s more civilised than you’d think on the road, with a still-decent ride quality and an interior that feels simple but way higher in quality than ever before) in order to relish what it can do once you get there. Which is to say, demolish pretty much anything that might happen to turn up with power this side of 500bhp.

    The biggest difference between the 250 and other Elises dynamically (apart from those tyres, which provide massive grip in the dry) is the extra torque the engine produces, and the extra couple of hundred revs available at the top of its range. The 250 in the car’s name refers to the 250Nm torque peak (that’s 184lb ft), not the power output (243bhp), and it’s available all the way from 3500 to 5000rpm, at which point power takes over to maintain the momentum. It’s some cocktail.

    The Elise 250 Cup is deeply thrilling to drive, and very, very quick around a track. It might not be to everyone’s taste, but for the committed few there is nothing else quite like it. Twenty years on, the Elise is still king of the hill, albeit at a suitably regal price.

    Above and below. A 1.8-litre engine, like the original Elise, but 243bhp and a track-devouring chassis justify the £45,000 price. Almost.
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