Aston Martin

Aston Martin / Lagonda Clubs and Groubs only

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    BimmerPost

    2020 Aston Martin DB11 AMR

    Posted in Cars on Monday, 18 May 2020

    The forecast? Sunshine and more throttle. You can get a DB11 with a V8. But that’s missing the point.

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    CAR #1965-Aston-Martin-DB5 / #1965 / #Aston-Martin-DB5 / #Aston-Martin

    OWNER Andrew English

    ‘I’m not In love, so don’t forget it,’ sang 10cc, in their eponymous 1975 number-one single; and I was beginning to feel the same way about Gobbo, my Aston Martin DB5.

    I’d almost decided to sell the old girl and had squared my conscience with the idea of parting with the ‘family heirloom’, as my wife puts it on the good days. But then I saw the new Bond No Time To Die trailer, which is book-ended by his Silver Birch DB5 roaring and sliding, battered but unbowed and firing its chain guns (yes, forget those Brownings). It’s the sort of film that makes you wonder whether you really want to relinquish one of the loveliest things you’ve ever owned.

    She’s been in my hands for many years now, though the Aston Martin Owners’ Club people still call her ‘Bob Fairburn’s Old Car’ or ‘Gobbo’. I bought her just as the tumbling masonry of the get-rich-quick ’80s was falling around our ears and DB5s were still rare, but available. I heard Gobbo before I bought her, twice. First, as Fairburn gunned her engine as he headed up to Glasgow after taking a class win at the AMOC Wiscombe hillclimb.

    Second, when a friend raced Gobbo past my house on open exhausts, the rev-counter yowling past 6000rpm. I lifted my head and entered the fantasy world that the impoverished Aston Martin owner must keep one foot in.

    In the meantime she’s been raced and hillclimbed but always as a standard car. She’s done countless high days and holidays and school proms, and had money poured into her slightly faster than you can pour it out of a two-gallon can. Two engine and complete drivetrain rebuilds, countless suspension and brake refurbs, and paint – oh, the paint that car has had in my tenure.

    Best event was undoubtedly the 1400m Mont Ventoux hillclimb in southern France, where we were gate-crashers on part-entry fees and were asked by the organisers to slow down as we were upsetting owners with potentially far faster cars. Another best day was when my daughter took the wheel.

    They’re all best days in an Aston but I have to admit that, while the costs have risen, my income hasn’t. Writing about cars never really did stretch to running a classic Aston, but these days it’s quite impossible; rates haven’t risen for over a decade. Gobbo really should go to someone with the wherewithal to keep her in the manner to which she’s become accustomed.

    Trouble is, as soon as you announce that such an unmolested prize – she’s never been totally apart – is for sale, you are descended on by an army of the most deluded Walter Mittys. ‘Just put a bloody advert in the paper: it’s simple,’ said Talacrest’s John Collins a few years ago, when I interviewed him about selling a Ferrari GTO. According to my friend Andrew Mitchell of body shop and restoration specialist Mitchell Motors in Wiltshire, however, now is not a good time to offer Gobbo up for sale. ‘If things pick up, try the Spring.’

    Good advice – but if you’re interested, get in touch anyway. To use that time-worn phrase: please, no time-wasters…
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    Jean Moss has owned her 1959 Aston Martin DB 2/4 Mark III Spider since the '70s

    Posted in Cars on Tuesday, 12 March 2019

    Me & My Aston Jean Moss has owned her DB MkIII since the '70s. We meet them both. Jean Moss has enjoyed fresh-air motoring in her tuned DB MkIII for more than four decades. We go for a spin. Words John Simister. Photography Matthew Howell.

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    Peter Tomalin

    Buying Guide Aston Martin V8 Vantage

    Posted in Cars on Tuesday, 12 March 2019

    British Beef. The classic V8 Vantage was a very British supercar and its appeal remains undiminished. Here's our guide to a true Aston great. Words Peter Tomalin. Photography Matthew Howell.

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    Going back to its spiritual home

    / #1998-Aston-Martin-DB7-Volante / #1998 / #Aston-Martin-DB7-Volante / #Aston-Martin-DB7 / #Aston-Martin

    SANJAY SEETANAH

    Graham Darby, general manager of Aston Martin Works in Newport Pagnell, had been following our adventures in the DB7 and invited me to see the new showroom and all the facilities. I was keen to visit the car’s ancestral home and set off on a wet Monday morning with trepidation in the knowledge that I would surely get stuck on the M1. The car behaved itself, though I spotted an annoying leak in the passenger footwell when it was chucking it down.

    The new facilities and showroom are across the road from the original Sunnyside headquarters, and as you round the corner you’re greeted with what can only be described as a five-star hotel for Astons (pictured right). The car park brimmed with customers’ cars and the forecourt was clearly designed to tempt you into the inevitable upgrade. Inside the reception area, the huge glass partition allows customers to view the technicians working away in a meticulously clean environment. As a customer’s car arrives, it is met by a consultant who parks it in an inspection bay; from the spotless floor emerges the otherwise invisible ramp, raising the car for its examination.

    At this point I held my breath... This was the first opportunity I’d had to look underneath the DB7, which had covered almost 120,000 miles. And so I braced myself for bad news.

    But senior technician Paul Wild poked and prodded and, to my relief, said the car was in surprisingly good condition. The corroded rear suspension springs would benefit from replacement and, as they are becoming increasingly difficult to find, as soon as possible; the job would transform the feel and behaviour of the car instantly. He told us not to make the mistake of buying Jaguar XJS versions as they are a few centimetres longer and would make the car handle terribly.

    I mentioned the leak in the footwell and Paul took a look. Turns out the drain chutes were blocked; they need to be cleared regularly.

    Graham was pleased I'd brought the car along and remarked that if the cars are used regularly and serviced properly they run without any unreliability issues, and that’s probably why my DB7 is still in such great shape for its year.
    As the days get shorter, I know that the opportunity to enjoy the DB7 will become limited, but I am determined to use it as much as possible. Can’t wait for some of those crisp winter mornings - so long as they’re not so crisp that the roads are gritted.
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