Link copied to your clipboard
Filter Timeline:
Pinned Items
Recent Activities
  •   Chris Chilton commented on this post about 5 months ago
    Jay Leno uploaded a new video
    / #1958-Chrysler-300D-Fuel-Injected / #1958 / #Chrysler-300D-Fuel-Injected / #Chrysler-300D / #Chrysler
    1958 Chrysler 300D Fuel Injected - Jay Leno’s Garage
    Jay’s in-house painter and body guy, Per Blixt, just completed his rare and hugely anticipated fuel injected 300D which you have seen updates over the years ...
    Post is under moderation
    Stream item published successfully. Item will now be visible on your stream.
  •   Chris Chilton commented on this post about 5 months ago
    Jay Leno uploaded a new video
    / #1958-Lincoln-Continental-Mark-III / #1958 / #Lincoln-Continental-Mark-III / #Lincoln-Continental / #Lincoln / #Ford
    The Massive 1958 Lincoln Continental Mark III - Jay Leno’s Garage
    This American behemoth had a lot of impressive luxury options for its time and is a veritable living room on wheels!
    Post is under moderation
    Stream item published successfully. Item will now be visible on your stream.
  •   Jay Leno reacted to this post about 6 months ago
    Jay Leno uploaded a new video
    Why do I suddenly like cars that I used to detest? This question occurred to me recently when, for some inexplicable reason, I bought a low-mileage two-door #1957-Imperial . To the uninitiated, Imperial was a luxury brand built by Chrysler to compete with Lincoln and Cadillac. Virgil Exner was the designer who turned Chrysler around when he joined the company in 1949. KT Keller was the president and chairman of the board at the time and, prior to Exner joining the company, Chrysler’s styling was stodgy, to say the least.

    / #1958-Imperial-Convertible / #1958 / #Imperial-Convertible / #Virgil-Exner / #Chrysler / #392ci-Hemi / #Hemi

    For example, Keller liked a higher roofline on his cars because he believed men should always wear a hat while driving. Exner had other ideas and by 1955 he was able to introduce them, starting with the Forward Look. By #1957 , at the height of his powers, he had designed the Imperial.

    By that time Imperial was its own brand with no Chrysler reference anywhere on the car. It was also Imperial’s best year because the Styling was so fresh and new. It even had a great slogan: ‘Suddenly It’s 1960!’ It gave everyone the impression that Imperial was three years ahead in the industry.

    These cars were built at a time of unbridled optimism. Gas was 25 cents a gallon, the interstate network was opening up, the space race was starting, climate change and cigarettes causing cancer were all so far in the future that nobody even thought about them.

    They were huge, too, built like tanks. I remember Imperials being banned at Demolition Derbies because Their massive frames, far stronger than anything else, were deemed an unfair advantage. Hot rodders in the ’60s cannibalised these cars for their 392ci Hemi engines. When I was a young man, these cars represented everything we hated about American automobiles. They weighed two-and-a-half tons, they got abysmal gas mileage, they couldn’t stop and could barely get around corners. While Jaguar had polished wood and Connolly leather, these American behemoths featured chrome put on with a trowel and an interior like Elvis’s coffin.

    ‘IT HAS A MASSIVE AIR-CONDITIONER, MORE LIKE A REFRIGERATION UNIT FROM A MEATPACKING PLANT’

    By the time I was able to drive, cars from this era were already over a decade old. They were built before steel was galvanised and they rusted almost immediately. By the time the ’70s and ’80s came around, gas prices had started to rise and most of the cars from this era looked like crippled-mastodons flailing around in some tar-pit. So why the attraction now? AmI trying to regain some part of my youth? Possibly. Or is it because it’s just so different from what we think of as an automobile today?

    First, let me tell you about the car I found. It’s all original and painted in Desert Sage, which is really just another name for pink. A man bought it new for his wife but it was too big for her to drive. It’s 19 feet long and it weighs just shy of 5000lb. She rarely drove the car, and it was parked sometime in 1964 with 64,000 miles on it. There it sat, indoors, for almost 55 years, so there is zero rust and the chrome is perfect. I drove it home on the tyres that were fitted in 1963.
    Modern cars have almost no exterior brightwork. In contrast the Imperial looks like a Wurlitzer juke box. There’s even a massive chrome strip that runs over the roof like some sort of roll bar. The steering wheel is enormous and the gauges are the size of dinner plates. If you have to wear glasses to see the speedometer, you should not be allowed to drive.
    It has push-button drive and all sorts of goofy switches; believe me, they couldn’t have cared less about ergonomics. Trying to figure out how to operate the turn signal took 10 minutes. It has a massive air-conditioner which looks more like a refrigeration unit from a meat-packing plant. You actually have to press down hard on the accelerator to compensate for the 25bhp needed to drive it.

    If you like buying cars by the pound, this is the way to go. Ferraris are about $1000 per pound and cars like this are about $5 per pound. When you hit somebody in a Ferrari the damage is life-altering. Hit somebody in this thing, and you don’t even know it till you get home and find the other car crushed up under your wheelarch. I don’t think I’ve ever had another car that stops traffic like this thing. In a town like LA, where Bentleys and McLarens barely get a second look, folks jump out at stop lights to ask me what it is. One guy in a hip part of town asked if he could buy my interior so he could make a suit out of the sparkly brown-material.

    It’s fun to jump between different automotive worlds. For example, last Saturday was the perfect day; I took the McLaren P1 out for a ride in the hills above LA and then took my wife out to dinner in the Imperial. After all, you need to have one sensible car to drive.
    1958 Imperial Convertible - Jay Leno's Garage
    With it's "Forward Look" design and massive 392 Hemi, Jay takes us on a ride in his Imperial Convertible that was the biggest and widest luxury car you could...
    Post is under moderation
    Stream item published successfully. Item will now be visible on your stream.
  •   Julian Balme reacted to this post about 1 year ago
    1932 #Ford-Roadster
    Run by Julian Balme
    Owned since May 2014
    Total mileage unknown
    Miles since acquisition 56
    Latest costs #Ford Roadster £698

    OUR YANK0PHILE BUYS A HOT ROD

    I’ve worked out that on the few occasions in my life that I’ve been hit by a cataclysmic emotional tsunami, my instant reaction is to buy a car. At the age of 11 when my father suddenly died, my collection of Corgi cars swelled overnight as I tried to compensate for the chasm left in my childhood. My mother had always assumed that once she passed on, I’d buy an #Aston-Martin-DB5 with the proceeds of her house sale and, though she’d underestimated the stratospheric rise in that particular car’s value, she wasn’t far off - the #1940 #Lincoln-Continental arrived shortly after her death. And now with the criminally premature passing of my wife Karen, I find myself with the keys to another new motor car.

    Maybe it was a sense of ‘doing today rather than waiting for tomorrow' that precipitated the purchase, but when Billy at NAMCO mentioned to me that he knew of a 1932 roadster for sale, I was actually interested to the point of going to see it. Prices for genuine #1932 Fords have sky-rocketed and I'd rather given up on the idea of ever owning one, but curiosity got the better of me. The vendor, Paul Hobby, had found the car last year at the LA Roadster Show in California, brought it to the UK thinking he was going to incorporate it into a hot rod he was building, then changed his mind.

    There was little history with the car, so I’d be grateful if any American readers could shed any light on its background, but what I do know is that it has been a hot rod for over 45 years. It was built by a father and son in Selma, California, and I’d like to think (fancifully) that the senior partner was the same John Ohlsen who worked for Ian Walker and Shelby American in the ’60s. It then passed to Parvin Rusell in Carlsbad, CA and it was from him that Hobby acquired the car.

    When the rod was first modified in the late 1960s or early 70s, the fashion for ‘resto rods' was to keep as much of the original car as possible, so things such as the cowl vent, running boards, bumpers, rear and sidelights have all been retained. The only body mods are the filling and peaking of the radiator grille shell and the top half of the hood being swapped out for a louvred Rootlieb item. Other than that, it is all genuine #1932 #Henry-Ford steel, though sadly in #2007 it was painted a pinky-orange that makes the body look like glassfibre anyway.

    That’s the good news. The bad news is that the drivetrain - a 1980-1985 Buick V6 engine coupled to an automatic transmission - is not to my taste at all. It goes really well, but GM parts in a Ford is just wrong. And proper hot rods should have three pedals. Rusell obviously used the car a lot (reputedly more than 80,000 miles) so he probably enjoyed the economy of the six-cylinder motor and the comfort of the radial tyres. I hate radials on older cars, so the first change I made was to fit 1in whitewall BF Goodrich Silvertown biased-ply tyres. That and the fitting of ’60s-style California licence plates.

    Apart from the attractive price, scarcity, and the fact that no one in the UK had seen the car, the deal clincher was a cutting found among the photos and receipts that came with it. A local paper had published a picture of the roadster parked up in a Californian street-probably to fill space rather than to relate worthy news (see inset). The location was Hermosa Beach in the South Bay of Los Angeles, the very first place Karen and I visited on the West Coast of the US and from where we set out together on our 27-year love affair with California. Its climate, geography, architecture, history, films, music, art, car culture and... its hot rods.

    A long way from CA: with the ex-Dean Lowe roadster pick-up, a former #Hot-Rod cover car.
    Post is under moderation
    Stream item published successfully. Item will now be visible on your stream.
  •   Jay Leno reacted to this post about 1 year ago
    Jay Leno uploaded a new video

    The other Sunday morning I pulled my McLaren F1 into a Cars & Coffee meet. A young man, probably in his mid-20s, approached me. ‘What’s it like to drive a car like that, with no driver aids of any kind?’ he asked.

    In his driving life, about ten years, he has probably never driven a car without them. In my driving life, which is considerably longer, most of the cars I own and drive have no driver aids at all.

    A good example is my #1953-Hudson-Hornet / #Hudson-Hornet / #Hudson / #1953 , made just before the advent of power steering and power brakes so everything is nicely weighted and balanced, this was the first American post-war design that was totally fresh and new. It featured a Monobilt Step-Down design; that’s where the floor pan was not on top of the frame but on the bottom of it. this not only lowered the car but gave you more headroom. At 60in tall, the Hudson was a good 6in or so lower than its competitors, this gave it a much lower centre of gravity and made it the best-handling American car of the era. It ruled NASCAR in the early ’50s; what it couldn’t do on the straight it made up in corners.

    Its Achilles’ heel was its 308ci flathead six-cylinder engine with two single-barrel carburettors, which in Hudson-speak was called Twin H-Power. In 1949, Oldsmobile revealed its new 303ci overhead-valve Rocket V8 that, with a four-barrel carburettor, gave 160bhp. Actually that was the same as the Hudson Hornet, but with those two extra cylinders and the gold valve covers it was a lot sexier.

    I have a film strip that Hudson sent to dealers, to show prospective customers. It features two cars with the bonnets up: a Rocket 88 and a Hornet. Standing next to the Rocket 88, an exasperated customer yells to a mechanic in a filthy coverall, ‘Why does it take so long to tune up this car?’ ‘It’s those pesky overhead valves,’ the mechanic explains, ‘they’re just too complicated.’

    then the camera pans to the Hudson mechanic who, in his clean, freshly pressed uniform, is gently closing the Hudson’s bonnet after torquing the heads, saying, ‘there you go Mr Johnson, she’s fit as a fiddle.’ As the Hudson owner beams with pride, he pulls away knowing he made the right choice with the tried and true flathead design. For a lot of people the last days of old technology were always better than the first days of new technology.

    A really old-school Hudson feature was that the clutch is lined with cork and runs in oil. It’s amazing how smooth and reliable it is. Another Hudson quirk is two braking systems, in case one fails: a hydraulic system and a mechanical back-up. It’s said that Stuart Baits, the chief engineer, had a bad accident and was seriously injured while testing Hudson’s new hydraulic brake system.

    Baits installed a steel rod, running from the brake pedal to the emergency brake on the rear wheels, to stop the car if the brake pedal ever went past the halfway point. As Henry Ford, who resisted hydraulic brakes up until the 1930s, said: ‘the safety of steel from pedal to wheel.’

    If you ever want to talk no driver aids, look no further than the 1913 Mercer Raceabout. I consider this to be, at least in America, the first true sports car. While other manufacturers were putting a huge lump of an engine, some as big as 12 litres, into a lightweight frame, the Mercer, which also has a lightweight frame, has a five-litre, four-cylinder T-head engine, thus making an extremely well-balanced package. It also features a four-speed gearbox and is one of the fastest and best- handling cars of the era, with a top speed of 100mph.

    It has a monocle windshield bolted to the steering column, no doors and minimal bodywork, the gas pedal is outside the car on the frame rail; your feet are so far apart that the women who’ve driven it say it’s akin to visiting the gynaecologist.

    the brakes don’t so much stop the car as merely retard progress. You have an outside handbrake which stops the rear wheels only, here’s a foot pedal that works as a transmission brake on the propshaft. Caution: use this too often and it will catch fire.

    Apart from the magneto, the Raceabout has no electrics. Even though electric lamps were popular, it has gas lamps, the advantage was that you could pop off the lamps, unbolt the fenders and go racing.

    My favourite thing is the exhaust cut-out to bypass the silencer. A pedal by your left foot opens the exhaust at the bottom of the manifold, the T-head engine, in full song, sounds like four shotguns fired in unison.

    If you’re a real purist about no driver aids, how about this? here’s no electric starter, so you have to hand-crank it. Take that, McLaren F1: who needs an electric starter anyway? Now we’re talking about no driver aids.
    1951 Hudson Hornet - Jay Leno's Garage
    Dave Bonbright served as an historian for the film, “Cars,” and helped inform the filmmakers on their decision to choose a Hudson for the character, “Doc Hudson.” Check out his beautiful, reliable, “Fabulous Hudson Hornet!”
    Post is under moderation
    Stream item published successfully. Item will now be visible on your stream.
  •   Jay Leno reacted to this post about 1 year ago
    CAR: #Chevrolet-Nomad / #GM / #1957-Chevrolet-Nomad / #Chevrolet /

    Year of manufacture #1957
    Recorded mileage 18,850
    Asking price £37,500
    Vendor Dave Caruso, Hertfordshire (private sale); tel: 07737 096073

    WHEN IT WAS NEW
    Price $2757
    Max power 185bhp
    Max torque 275lb ft
    0-60mph 12.3 secs
    Top speed 99mph
    Mpg 15

    This rare wagon came to the UK two years ago, imported from California by the vendor. It’s going only because he has too many other cars vying for his time. It’s straight and apparently rot-free under an older repaint. The solid chassis has a few minor knocks, the inner wings and arches are mint. The only flaws were small bubbles at the base of the passenger door. All of the brightwork is present and undamaged, most of it likely original, and the correct Nomad rear script will be on by the time of sale. The front ‘Dagmar’ rubbers are undamaged, plus the wheeltrims are undinged, the centre badges all intact. It wears a sunvisor plus the dash-mounted ‘signal seer’ prism for reading traffic lights. All the windows (sliding at the sides) open and close as they should, and there are H4 lights, plus new exhausts. It sits on Classic radials, with plenty of tread – including the spare, near which we find new rear dampers and a repaired upper mount on the right.

    The 283 is stock apart from a four-barrel Holley, but the original twin-choke Rochester is included. Its coolant is full and green, the oil darkish and mid marks, while the transmission fluid is pink and sweet-smelling. Inside, it’s superb with all the dash trim intact, though the instrument bezels and the steering column shroud are chromed. The seat covers are probably repro items; the driver’s seat base velour is worn threadbare and a tear in the back was due to be fixed. The headlining is excellent and all of the chrome strips are in place. There are electric wipers, auxiliary gauges under the dash, and it has a modern digital radio in the original slot.

    It starts easily, and drives really well for a 60 year old, suggesting that it’s never been significantly apart. There’s plenty of grunt from the V8 and smooth changes from the three-speed Turboglide, though it’s quite lowgeared. It tracks straight, with no clonks from the suspension, and the re-lined brakes are sharp, but they pull slightly to the right. It’s easy to manage and the compact turning circle comes as a surprise. Oil pressure is over 50psi warm when driving, and coolant steady at about 85ºC. The Chevy will be sold UK-registered – its NOVA paperwork is already done.

    SUMMARY

    EXTERIOR Straight; repainted; good trim
    INTERIOR All there and all works; some wear to the driver’s seat
    MECHANICALS In rude health; performs well
    VALUE 7/10

    For Standard and super-cool, with desirable options
    Against Bubbles on offside door

    SHOULD I BUY IT? Well priced compared to similar cars in the US, it’s deceptively usable on UK roads, being about the size of today’s large European cars
    Post is under moderation
    Stream item published successfully. Item will now be visible on your stream.
  •   Malcolm McKay reacted to this post about 2 years ago
    Car #Chevrolet-Master-Deluxe / #Chevrolet-Special-Rally-Car / #1941-Chevrolet-Master-Deluxe / #Chevrolet-Master / #Chevrolet / #GM /
    Year of manufacture #1941
    Recorded mileage 6347
    Asking price £60,000
    Vendor RPS, Witney, Oxfordshire; tel: 01993 358009; www.rps.com

    WHEN IT WAS NEW
    Price $715
    Max power 123bhp
    Max torque 170lb ft
    0-60mph n/a
    Top speed c85mph
    Mpg n/a

    This Chevy was prepared for rallying by RPS after it had spent some time in the Haynes International Motor Museum. It features RPS’ suspension mods – big telescopic dampers with travel-limiting straps, front anti-roll bar – and its comprehensive rewire and replumb with double fuel lines. It also has comfy Corbeau seats and harnesses, but retains the standard transmission and doesn’t run a roll-cage, though a sump guard is included.

    It’s nice and straight, with factory paint flaking in a couple of places, the doors having been resprayed. All of the bright trim is present, the grille lightly corroded and the rear wings slightly bent, and it’s a bit unfinished where the running boards have been removed, but it’s a working rally car. It also runs RPS’ lightweight vinyl-skinned bootlid, beneath which is a load of costly aluminium work. There are two spares, both unused. Incredibly, the matching Fulda commercial tyres on the car, mounted on new van wheels, have done a Peking-Paris and a Flying Scotsman yet retain plenty of tread. The motor is tidy, rebuilt before the P-P. It wears twin Daytona carbs on a Kenton manifold, plus an electric fan and lightweight high-torque starter, and has lots of extra relays on the bulkhead, plus an electric fuel pump and big filter lurking. Coolant is fullish and blue; oil topped-up but dark.

    Inside, the door trims and headlining are fine, just coming adrift about the right pillar. Fake veneer paint is tidy on the door tops, flaking on the dash, and there are extra auxiliary gauges as well as a Monit tripmeter. The 235cu in ‘six’ (3.9-litre, optional over the standard 216) fires easily and it’s a pleasant drive with lots of torque, a decent column shift and the ride well controlled by the big dampers. The speedo doesn’t work (GPS is more accurate) but the wind-up clock does. Oil pressure is just under 3bar, which is healthy for one of these, and temperature stays at the lower end of the gauge. The all-round drums have uprated friction material and pull up adequately for the performance, which is quite sprightly; great fun. It’s being sold for less than it cost to build, but to take it to the next level, with five-speed Tremec and Ford 9in rear axle, would cost c£20k.

    SUMMARY

    EXTERIOR Tidy; decent paint; all trim there
    INTERIOR What’s original is mostly good
    MECHANICALS Completely rebuilt; feels as if it would go to the moon and back

    VALUE ★★★★★★★★✩✩
    For Easy to drive; on the button
    Against Transmission is the weak item for rallies

    SHOULD I BUY IT?
    If you want a good basis for a longdistance rally car, built by the best, then worth a serious look – either to drive as is or feed more steroids.
    Post is under moderation
    Stream item published successfully. Item will now be visible on your stream.
  •   Ben Koflach reacted to this post about 3 years ago
    NOW AND THEN, A BAD-ASS MUSCLE CAR ROLLS INTO TOWN AND TRUE TO TRADITION, WE’RE THE FIRST TO GIVE YOU THE SCOOP!

    Gavin Wilkins gave us a call explaining to us that he has a very important car laying in his workshop. In true Gavin Wilkins' tradition, he gave us a few basic clues, like the car was supposedly an American muscle car with a hefty 8-cylinder motor, and was supposedly modified there too. But a few weeks before, we came to hear of a rather unique #1971 #Plymouth #Cuda , a 2-door coupe which had arrived on our shores, and I began wondering if this was the said Unicorn. Now, dear readers: photos and print media do not tell the true mastery of this Cuda. It has to be seen in person to understand this car's enormity. A few years back, a chassis building company in the USA named Morrison were commissioned to oversee the project of restoring an old Plymouth. Over and above the channelling process where the Cuda's body was lowered to hang 4" over the frame, subtle mods such as shaved drip rails, a custom front valance and air dam, and those erotic side fender grilles were all crafted by the team at Morrison.

    But in all honesty, I think it’s the way the meticulous matte paintwork contrasts against the bits of orange which adorn the rear fenders. Or maybe it's the way the fenders hug those devilishly custom-made Intro Wheels which are 20 and 18" large? Or could it be the way the Strange coilovers are joined in holy matrimony with the Watts link rear suspension and the Corvette C5 front suspension which together, have created the perfect stance for the perfect American muscle car? I just don’t know. But what I do know is that this blurry indecision makes me yearn for a cup of tea.

    Swing open the driver's door, and nothing much grabs your attention except for those white dials, the Momo steering wheel and those RCi 5-point race harnesses. But weirdly though, once you sit in those superbly covered sport seats, and run your hand over the suede roof lining and notice the Morrison-built rollcage, you begin to understand that everything inside the cockpit is there for a reason. Besides the welcoming addition of electric windows, those elegant billet pieces on the steering column, and the TCi Outlaw shifter - which screams to be grabbed - is all part and parcel of the Cuda's theatre.

    The front of the car is where the party happens: Over and above the grille and headlights which came off a 2009 Challenger, the hand built shaker hood (a fancier name for the air intake which moves with the engine f movement)is what lures you to the bonnet in a trancelike state.

    Unclick the bonnet latches to pop the Cuda's hood and the motor resembles something out of Hollywood. Coated in what looks like sugary candied orange, the Hemi motor is a work of art, and when it awakens, things start a-shaking...

    I can honestly say that the engine is massive. Last time I saw something this huge, I flew in it to Europe. Barely squeezed into that painstakingly smoothed and shaven engine bay, lies an angry, 605 cubic inches Hemi monster, and let me tell you, it swallows fuel at an alarming rate.

    “Look, this thing guzzles hey." laughs Gavin. “You can let it idle, and in a few minutes, that fuel gauge needle will start going down. If you had to drive from Alberton to Eastgate, you’ll probably run out of fuel." The impetus for this whole project began in Indiana by a specialist cylinder head company named Indy Cylinder Heads. In addition to their line of big and small block #Mopar and AMC heads, Indy also build complete engines and are synonymous for the being the best at what they do.

    The motor powering this 'Cuda is a spare-no-expense, take-no-prisoners powerplant using a Maxx aluminum block, an Eagle 4750 steel crank, and humungous Diamond 4.500 forged pistons-115mm in diameter (let that sink in for a while)- down below.

    Topside is a pair of their Legend series heads with full CNC port and polish, bigger valves and thicker L19 ARP bolts and studs. Naturally, a COMP Cams solid roller thumps the lifters up and down and gives just the right signal to the big #King-Demon-1,050-cfm carb sitting atop the high-rise intake. In addition to the 511 hp on the wheels - which Gavin proudly states is the highest street car reading he's ever had at GWR - this bad boy rips the dyno in half with over 780Nm of torque, even more impressive on pump gas!

    “When the car arrived at my workshop, the engine needed some TLC - it was tired and the body had to be reprayed by Dinos. There were so many other niggles which we sorted out too - mainly after hours because there was no way I was going to work on an engine of this magnitude with other distractions happening around me. One mistake can be very costly."

    When the metal industry closes up shop for the weekend, and the roads in and around GWR have quietened down, Gavin takes the car around the block for a quick test and returns with a smile from ear to ear.

    “The car rides beautifully. It's built right and it shows as it drives perfectly and solidly without any drama. It's a real cruiser and attention grabber!" explains Gavin as he switches off the car.

    The car is to be returned to the owner in a matter of days, and as Gav wipes off a bit of dirt off the fender, he ends, "This particular owner loves his cars to be done right: he's a perfectionist who appreciates the finer forms of the automobile, and I'm grateful to have worked on this' Cuda. It's a one of a kind car, with a one of a kind attitude."


    THE ENGINE BAY LOOKS LIKE SOMETHING FROM A TRANSFORMERS MOVIE.

    QUKKSPECS #1971 #Plymouth-Cuda-2 Door-Coupe / #Plymouth-Cuda-2-Door-Coupe / #Plymouth-Cuda

    ENGINE: #605-Hemi / #Hemi - Maxx aluminium Hemi block - Eagle con-rods - #Eagle 4.750 crank - #Diamond 4500 pistons – #Federal-Mogul race bearings - #ARP L19 bolts and studs - Indy aluminium hemi cylinder heads - Indy roller rockers - #Comp-Cams solid roller camshafts - 3" exhaust - #Flowmaster mufflers - MSD 6AL custom fuel tank - Edelbrock fuel pump and fuel pressure regulator – #King-Demon 1050cfm carburetor.

    TRANSMISSION / DRIVETRAIN: 2-speed auto transmission - 9" Ford rear differential - TCi heavy case #Powerglide transmission - 3" Morrison propshaft - 35-spline #Morrison driveshafts.

    WHEELS / TYRES: Custom 20" x 12j Intro Wheels (rear) and matching 18" x 8j (front) Intro wheels in the front - #Pirelli tyres. Suspension: Full Corvette C5 front suspension - Watts Link rear suspension - Strange coilovers.

    BRAKES: 6-pot Wilwood calipers -14" #Wilwood brake discs. Exterior: Full respray by Dino’s Autobody - Morrison-built full chassis - 2009 Challenger grille and headlights - hand-built #Shaker hood - billet hood hinges - shaved drip rails - custom front valance and air dam.

    INTERIOR: Full leather and suede interior - RCi 5-point harnesses electric windows with power steering - Morrison-built rollcage - TCi shifter - custom white guages - billet aluminium column stalks.

    The custom intro wheels are spectacular. Wilwood provides the stopping power. The rear is rounded off with two Flowmaster mufflers. The modern #MOMO steering wheel pops against the classic interior. RCi 5-point harnesses clip you in.
    Post is under moderation
    Stream item published successfully. Item will now be visible on your stream.
  •   Ben Koflach reacted to this post about 3 years ago
    Rodders line up outside the wonderfully preserved Horsted Keynes railway station, where full use was made of the coal fire.

    Rad cowl shows traces of filled cap hole.
    Panels removed to provide access to fan.
    Resisting the urge for an impromptu race at Dungeness.
    Brake woes are now sorted.

    / #Ford-Roadster / #Ford / #1932
    Run by Julian Balme
    Owned since May 2014
    Total mileage unknown
    Miles since March
    2015 report 612
    Latest costs nil.

    RODDERS HEAD FORTHE COAST

    The last time that I wrote about the ’1932, I had just taken part in the VSCC’s Pomeroy Trophy. That marked the start of an eventful year with the car, particularly during the months that are optimistically regarded as British summertime.

    Maintenance was kept to a bare minimum but I did replace the electric fan. The task was more involved than with a normal car, but far more rewarding because of the Ford’s simple construction – and the fact that I found a replacement unit sitting on a shelf in the garage, already paid for. There are not many vehicles that require half the front sheet-metal removing in order to access the rear of the rad, though. I was tickled during the process to find the original grille shell – a rare and prized item – had been filled where the radiator cap had been. A textbook example of the customiser’s art.

    When turned into a hot rod, the roadster was built with long trips, comfort and economy in mind rather than outright speed. As a result, it makes all the wrong noises but is more than content to visit Sainsbury’s – as it has on occasion.

    I mentioned in my first report on the Ford that it was very much a bereavement purchase and subsequently, as a way of acknowledging my wife Karen’s passing, I’ve found myself organising an annual reliability run for the closest of chums.

    Last year we spent a weekend in the Cotswolds visiting places of automotive and cultural interest, ranging from Tim Dutton’s Bugatti haven to the Compton Verney art gallery.


    This year, we headed off to the south coast and rented a beach house in Winchelsea. From there, we undertook a similarly scenic and even greater culinary loop of the East Sussex countryside. Our ‘ultimate man-cave’ was CKL, just outside Battle, where Ben Shuckburgh kindly gave up his Saturday morning to show us some of the amazing kit being worked on and stored there. The seductive array of Jaguars went down well but it was a race-prepped Allard J2 that got the greatest scrutiny from the rodders, to whom the combination of Cadillac speed equipment and ’40s Ford components was all too familiar.

    By sticking to back roads, we managed to avoid the traffic, our convoy being greeted surprisingly enthusiastically by the occasional dog walker or horse rider along the way. Ironically, one of the only cars we encountered on the country lanes was driven by E-type guru Henry Pearman of Eagle GB.

    The route took us up to Horsted Keynes station on the Bluebell Railway, where we were warmly welcomedby the volunteers running the heritage steam line, although the waiting-room coal fire was even more popular with us. By the time that we returned to the coast, we had chalked up about 80 stress-free miles with no major issues. The other four cars making up the run would all be heading off to Pendine for the Vintage Hot Rod Association’s annual blast six weeks later, so for them it was a welcome shakedown. As for me, I was trying to find out why I had an increasingly spongy brake pedal.

    Confidence in the ability to stop being far from overrated in a car with automatic transmission, my mate Steve and I hastily bled the system before heading out the next morning. The result was a much firmer pedal and it started to deteriorate only after our Sunday visit to Dungeness and during the slog back to London.

    Closer inspection in the comfort of my own garage revealed that the nearside front flexible hose was not only twisted where it met the caliper, but was also rubbing on one of the trailing arms. On taking the braided pipe off, I had to remove a small L-shaped steel line attached to it as well as a union mounted to the chassis. At first I thought that in my usual hamfisted way I had snapped the pipe but, as I looked closer, I couldn’t find any traces of a flared end. The pipe had been interference fitted into the union adjoining the flexible line!

    Colin Mullan made me a new copper line and a trip to Think Automotive, which is just around the corner from him, provided two new flexible pipes for both sides of the front end. I’ve yet to find time to fit them, but once done summer might finally have arrived.
    Post is under moderation
    Stream item published successfully. Item will now be visible on your stream.
There are no activities here yet
Unable to load tooltip content.

Drive-My.COM MEDIA EN/UK based is United Kingdom’s top cars/retro/classic/modern/tuning/moto/commercial news, test drive, classic cars and classifieds. For car advertisement be it an RETRO/CLASSIC/OLD-TIMER/NEW-TIMER, Coupe, MPV, SUV, Luxury Car, Commercial vehicle, OPC car or even an auction car. We update you with latest information on new car prices from both parallel importers and car authorised dealers with brands such as Aston-Martin, Bristol, TVR, Bentley, Ford, Porsche, Jaguar, Land Rover, Citroen, Tesla, DS, Alfa Romeo, Subaru, Toyota, Acura, Honda, Nissan, Audi, Kia, Hyundai, Volkswagen, Volvo, Mitsubishi, BMW, Mercedes-Benz. Find new car pricelists, new car promotions, new car reviews, latest car news, car reviews & car insurance UK. We are also your information hub for parking, road tax, car insurance and car loan, car audio, car performance parts, car discussion, motor insurance, car grooming, car rental, vehicle insurance, car insurance quotation, car accessories, car workshop, & car sticker, tuning, stance and Cars Clubs

Our Drive-My EN/USA site use cookies