Details
CLASSIC ON THE CUSP Ferrari F430 As modern Ferraris embrace turbos, the normally aspirated F430 appeals / Cost new £1...
CLASSIC ON THE CUSP Ferrari F430

As modern Ferraris embrace turbos, the normally aspirated F430 appeals / Cost new £117,000 Value now £100,000

I’m not surprised how the Ferrari F430 has been pulled up by the value slipstream of almost every other prancing horse – but what has amazed me is how quickly prices have moved. Not long ago F430s were just a modern used Ferrari and now they’re suddenly neo classics. You’ll need to act fast before low-mileage coupés head to £100k and the rare Scuderia models (2000 built) move towards £250k. But with this Ferrari the rise is justified because the F430 is almost as good as a 458.


Top speed is 196mph and 60mph comes up in just under four seconds, but the epic ride and handling balance is what sets this car apart. The amalgam of switchblade-sharp steering, adjustable suspension and microsecond shifting from the brilliant F1 auto are the nearest you’ll get to the feel of an F1 car. Given the F430’s huge ability we’ve been undervaluing it for the past few years and treating it like just another contemporary secondhand supercar. Yet it drives a hundred times better than a Testarossa, 456 or – heresy of heresies – a Dino or Daytona. You’ll be buying one of the best-performing Ferraris of a generation – and one of the most reliable. Having timing chains reduces those heart-stopping fibre belt change bills and apart from cracking exhaust brackets and manifolds, ball joint and track rod end wear, it’s bombproof. Failing dash lights are common and the wheels can buckle easily but owners report few faults and most use them as daily drivers.

Don’t dismiss cars with mileage though. A 30,000-mile F430 is great value because it’s likely to be in fine fettle yet will be cheaper because most Ferrari buyers are anal about mileage. Entry level is £60k for a 2005 coupé but MP Motorsportz in Bucks has a 2006 F1 Spyder in Grigio Metallic with 28k miles and full history for £70k. But if you do want a low-miler, BHP Ltd in Aylesbury has a 2005 FI coupé in Rosso Red with 8490 miles at £70,795. Both are still sitting behind the recent value surge.

Unlike the 355, the F1 gearbox is better than the manual and definitely worth having but F1 clutches can wear quickly with town work and the carbon-fibre brakes may be wonderful but big money if you need pads and discs. Spyders are running at a premium but the lines look a little clumsy while the Berlinetta’s sweeping roof silhouette is timelessly elegant.

Prime investment potential comes with the Scuderia versions. In May Silverstone Auctions sold a Scuderia coupé with just 85km for £247,500. Such an unrepeatable opportunity seems like inspired buying now. And that £247k benchmark will drag up values of all other F430s in its wake so expect prices to creep up even further. You’ve got a brief window before everybody realises that the F430 offers infi nitely better performance and poise than almost anything from the past four decades of Maranello. The F430 is that rare thing – a fastappreciating classic Ferrari that really does deserve the hype.

‘A 30,000-mile F430 is great value because it’s likely to be in fi ne fettle but likely to be cheaper’
More
Blogs in Group
    No posts created yet.
Link copied to your clipboard
Filter Timeline:
Pinned Items
Recent Activities
  •   Dale Drinnon reacted to this post about 3 years ago
    Market. Model Focus: Ferrari-F430. Maranello melded Performance and usability with the F430, and you can even get it with a manual gearbox! By Adam Towler. / #Ferrari-F430 / #Ferrari / #Ferrari-F430-Spider / #Pininfarina / #2005 - #2009

    The F430 is arguably the First truly modern, mass-market Ferrari. It’s a car no excuses had to be made for, one that could be used every day without issue. It was also the point where the ‘junior’ Ferrari took off into the performance stratosphere, offering nearly 500bhp and a price to match, the car retailing in the UK for around £117,000.

    The all-new 4.3-litre engine (fundamentally shared with Maserati) was chain-driven, so the belt-change maintenance regime of older V8 Ferraris was a thing of the past. Overall, it really was good news in terms of reliability and running costs, as our two experts (right) attest. There are four variants of the F430: the Berlinetta and the spider (both 483bhp, and arriving in 2004 and 2007 respectively), plus the #Ferrari-430-Scuderia and its roofless Scuderia spider 16M counterpart (both 503bhp, and launching in 2007 and 2009 respectively).

    Tony Glynn at Foskers says: ‘it’s a shock they’ve gone up in value so soon – 18 per cent in two years. The strongest sellers are manual-gearbox cars – people perceive them to be the last manual Ferrari, and good to have in years to come. The scuds and 16Ms are very strong, too. You can expect to pay around £95,000 for a 15,000-mile spider with the F1 ’box, with a coupe perhaps £5000 less.

    A manual car would be around £110,000, with a Scuderia £200,000 and a 16M £275,000. The collector market wants sub-10,000-mile cars but these can’t be driven. Up to 20,000-mile cars can be used, but over 30,000 there’s quite a tail-off in values. A Scuderia with that mileage is almost unsaleable – it would need to be kept long-term.’

    If the thought of paying £200,000-plus for a Scuderia you can’t drive sounds absurd, you’ll be interested in the prices of those leggier examples. We’ve seen a 42,000-mile Scuderia priced below £130,000 at an official Ferrari dealer. Such cars may not appeal to investors, but they’re begging to be bought, loved and – above all – driven.

    EXPERT VIEW

    TOM KEYS, FERRARI-SERVICING.COM

    ‘Mechanically these are very strong. Engine and gearbox issues are rare but the operating systems linked to the E-diff and the F1 system can occasionally give trouble, although it’s usually easily rectified. Exhaust manifolds are known to crack and in extreme circumstances could cause engine damage. Numerous solutions exist, such as fitting aftermarket manifolds or having them “rebuilt” with thicker-gauge steel to prevent future issues.

    ‘Servicing is relatively cheap. The 430 is chain-driven so no cambelts. An annual service costs £600 and a major is £1320 here at Keys Motorsport. ‘Ball-joints are a common failing point. Signs of this are rattling from the suspension over bumpy and uneven ground. We fit upgraded, Hill Engineering ball-joints and shields as they are superior quality and actually cheaper than the Ferrari part. Budget approximately £300 to supply and fit each individual ball joint – there are eight on the car in total.

    ‘F430s came with either carbonceramic or steel brakes. Steel-equipped cars are friendlier on the wallet; budget £14,400 to replace ceramic discs and pads, if fitting genuine parts.’

    ALASTAIR GILL, FOSKERS.COM

    ‘The thing is to make sure you get the right example in the first place. From there, maintenance is key: stick to the service schedule, as this will pay dividends in the long run. These cars must always be kept on battery conditioners – the electronics will kill a battery within two weeks. Jump-starting is a major no as this can lead to serious electrical issues with blowing ECUs.

    ‘Clutch replacement is a grey area. It all depends on how the car has been used and if it’s an F1 or a manual. The cost to replace a clutch assembly on either works out at approximately £3600. F1 pumps are sometimes an issue, but sadly on the 430 there is no cheaper alternative – unlike on the 360 – as it has a different pump that also supplies the E-diff.

    ‘The suspension ball-joints, front track rod ends and also the rear suspension tie bars are weak points. The other key issue is the exhaust manifolds. These were prone to breaking up and blowing, which if left and continually driven could result in serious engine issues. Most of them have been replaced now, but if they need renewing this can be very costly as the manifolds alone are around £2400 per side.’
    Post is under moderation
    Stream item published successfully. Item will now be visible on your stream.
  •   Ben Barry reacted to this post about 3 years ago
    votren911 updated the picture of the group
    Post is under moderation
    Stream item published successfully. Item will now be visible on your stream.
  •   Adam Towler reacted to this post about 3 years ago
    Sam Dawson updated the cover photo of the group
    Post is under moderation
    Stream item published successfully. Item will now be visible on your stream.
  • Sam Dawson created this group

    Ferrari F430

    CLASSIC ON THE CUSP Ferrari F430

    As modern Ferraris embrace turbos, the normally aspirated F430 appeals / Cost new £117,000 Value now £100,000

    I’m not surprised how the Ferrari F430 has been pulled up by the value slipstream of almost every other prancing horse – but what has amazed me is...
    CLASSIC ON THE CUSP Ferrari F430

    As modern Ferraris embrace turbos, the normally aspirated F430 appeals / Cost new £117,000 Value now £100,000

    I’m not surprised how the Ferrari F430 has been pulled up by the value slipstream of almost every other prancing horse – but what has amazed me is how quickly prices have moved. Not long ago F430s were just a modern used Ferrari and now they’re suddenly neo classics. You’ll need to act fast before low-mileage coupés head to £100k and the rare Scuderia models (2000 built) move towards £250k. But with this Ferrari the rise is justified because the F430 is almost as good as a 458.


    Top speed is 196mph and 60mph comes up in just under four seconds, but the epic ride and handling balance is what sets this car apart. The amalgam of switchblade-sharp steering, adjustable suspension and microsecond shifting from the brilliant F1 auto are the nearest you’ll get to the feel of an F1 car. Given the F430’s huge ability we’ve been undervaluing it for the past few years and treating it like just another contemporary secondhand supercar. Yet it drives a hundred times better than a Testarossa, 456 or – heresy of heresies – a Dino or Daytona. You’ll be buying one of the best-performing Ferraris of a generation – and one of the most reliable. Having timing chains reduces those heart-stopping fibre belt change bills and apart from cracking exhaust brackets and manifolds, ball joint and track rod end wear, it’s bombproof. Failing dash lights are common and the wheels can buckle easily but owners report few faults and most use them as daily drivers.

    Don’t dismiss cars with mileage though. A 30,000-mile F430 is great value because it’s likely to be in fine fettle yet will be cheaper because most Ferrari buyers are anal about mileage. Entry level is £60k for a 2005 coupé but MP Motorsportz in Bucks has a 2006 F1 Spyder in Grigio Metallic with 28k miles and full history for £70k. But if you do want a low-miler, BHP Ltd in Aylesbury has a 2005 FI coupé in Rosso Red with 8490 miles at £70,795. Both are still sitting behind the recent value surge.

    Unlike the 355, the F1 gearbox is better than the manual and definitely worth having but F1 clutches can wear quickly with town work and the carbon-fibre brakes may be wonderful but big money if you need pads and discs. Spyders are running at a premium but the lines look a little clumsy while the Berlinetta’s sweeping roof silhouette is timelessly elegant.

    Prime investment potential comes with the Scuderia versions. In May Silverstone Auctions sold a Scuderia coupé with just 85km for £247,500. Such an unrepeatable opportunity seems like inspired buying now. And that £247k benchmark will drag up values of all other F430s in its wake so expect prices to creep up even further. You’ve got a brief window before everybody realises that the F430 offers infi nitely better performance and poise than almost anything from the past four decades of Maranello. The F430 is that rare thing – a fastappreciating classic Ferrari that really does deserve the hype.

    ‘A 30,000-mile F430 is great value because it’s likely to be in fi ne fettle but likely to be cheaper’
    More
    Post is under moderation
    Stream item published successfully. Item will now be visible on your stream.
  • Sam Dawson updated the picture of the group
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    Post is under moderation
    Stream item published successfully. Item will now be visible on your stream.
There are no activities here yet
Unable to load tooltip content.

Drive-My.COM MEDIA EN/UK based is United Kingdom’s top cars/retro/classic/modern/tuning/moto/commercial news, test drive, classic cars and classifieds. For car advertisement be it an RETRO/CLASSIC/OLD-TIMER/NEW-TIMER, Coupe, MPV, SUV, Luxury Car, Commercial vehicle, OPC car or even an auction car. We update you with latest information on new car prices from both parallel importers and car authorised dealers with brands such as Aston-Martin, Bristol, TVR, Bentley, Ford, Porsche, Jaguar, Land Rover, Citroen, Tesla, DS, Alfa Romeo, Subaru, Toyota, Acura, Honda, Nissan, Audi, Kia, Hyundai, Volkswagen, Volvo, Mitsubishi, BMW, Mercedes-Benz. Find new car pricelists, new car promotions, new car reviews, latest car news, car reviews & car insurance UK. We are also your information hub for parking, road tax, car insurance and car loan, car audio, car performance parts, car discussion, motor insurance, car grooming, car rental, vehicle insurance, car insurance quotation, car accessories, car workshop, & car sticker, tuning, stance and Cars Clubs

Our Drive-My EN/USA site use cookies