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  •   Davy Lewis reacted to this post about 3 years ago
    RETRO – THE EARLY UR QUATTRO / Heritage – The CA chassis Ur #Quattro / #1981 / #1982 / #Audi-Ur-quattro / #Audi-Ur-quattro / #Audi-CA-Quattro / #CA-Quattro / #Audi-Quattro /

    ‘It is remarkable that Audi decided to switch from LHD to RHD only weeks before the next chassis variant was due...’


    The #Audi-CA-chassis / #Audi

    Darron Edwards continues his analysis of the early Ur-quattros with some discussion of the details of the CA chassis (1981-1982)…

    In August of 1981, Audi started production of their second Ur quattro chassis production run, designated CA. These cars differed very little externally from the previous cars as most of the improvements made were under the skin. The engine bore and stroke remained the same and power output stayed at the quoted 200 PS.

    Some wiring improvements were made to try to reduce the load on the electrical system, although the ‘euro’ type fuse board was retained. These early fuseboards suffered in later years from bad contacts on the pins at the rear of the boards. Electrical resistance would build up across the contacts and cause the connector blocks to get very hot. All of these early cars had the main headlights, and other equipment, running straight through the ‘X’ contact on the ignition switch, which put a great strain on the wiring, especially on a cold winter morning with headlights, demister and fan on etc. Later cars would benefit form a large current (40 Amp) relay, alleviating this problem. Standard equipment remained the same for the 1982 model and the poor performing Hella twin headlamps were still fitted as on the previous year’s model. These would be replaced on later production cars by the much improved Cibie one-piece units, but not until after the annual factory closedown in the summer of 1982 by which time the CA chassis production run had come to an end.

    An external change that occurred on this model was the removal of the front and rear metal trim insert that was fitted to the windscreen rubbers. A solid rubber seal was used, removing the need for the metal retaining trim. All quattros that followed were fitted with this new type of front and rear windscreen seal.

    Underneath the car, the suspension and ride height was unchanged. The rear anti-roll bar, seen on the previous cars, was fitted until the end of this chassis run. This was removed for the 1983 year model. I’ve driven both types of Ur quattro, with and without rear anti-roll bar and the difference is very noticeable. The cornering of early cars is slightly sharper, more agile, but the big difference is noticed when lifting off the throttle when in mid-corner. The cars with the rear anti-roll bar tend to shift into oversteer rather violently when the throttle is lifted which may well explain why Audi decided to do away with the rear antiroll bar on later cars. What may have been perfectly desirable for a rally driver probably wasn’t the best thing for a company director on his way to a business appointment who’d gone just a little too fast into a corner and then lifted off in response.

    Internally, the 1982 year model used the same ‘moccha’ interior as the previous model, trimmed with the hard-wearing velour upholstery. The bolsters on the front seats were longer than on the previous chassis and this gave the front passengers a little more lateral stability and comfort around the thighs.

    Another feature that appeared on the 1982 car was an added ‘brow’ above the driver’s dash binnacle. This was a piece of ribbed plastic, added onto the existing surround, and it looked quite sporty as well as having a practical use in shading the instruments.


    The hand-operated diff lock levers were dropped from the middle of the previous chassis run, so all CA chassis cars were fitted with the pneumatic system that utilised a Bowden cable that runs underneath the car from front to rear to operate the centre differential lock. It proved problematic and this system was superseded from 1984. The easy solution was to move one of the pneumatic actuators from the rear diff housing to the side of the gearbox, thus removing the need for the Bowden cable.

    As from the beginning of production, all Ur quattros were factory built in lefthand drive form only. This continued through 1981. Some cars were converted to righthand drive in the UK by #GTI-Engineering and #David-Sutton-Motorsport . Clearly there was a demand for a proper right-hand-drive version in the UK. Audi received formal requests for a purpose-built UK car as early as #1980 but this was only granted by the factory in mid-July of 1982.

    It is remarkable that Audi decided to do this only weeks before the next chassis variant was due to be produced. In the last month of the CA chassis run, Audi built 17 right-hand-drive vehicles, 12 of which were destined for the UK. These cars are the rarest of all Type 85 variants. Phil Jameson of the quattro owners’ club has tracked down 10 of these rare UK cars. It’s testament to the build quality that most of these prototype right-hand drive cars are still in existence. These cars were all registered in the UK after August 1, 1982 so all would have probably appeared on ‘Y’ registration plates. A quadheadlamp quattro on this plate would likely be a late production right-hand-drive car so if you see one for sale, check to see if the V5 carries the designation ‘RHD’. If this is the case, you may be able to grab yourself the rarest Ur quattro of all...
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  •   Lester Dizon reacted to this post about 4 years ago
    MILLTEK SPORT MB QUATTRO CLASSIC AUDIS – MILLTEK MB QUATTRO PHOTOS: NEIL BIRKITT (WITH THANKS TO LEIGH RAVEY AND KENNY LONGDON) / #Audi-Ur-quattro / #Audi-Quattro / #Audi-Ur-Quattro-Milltek / #Audi-Quattro-Milltek / #Audi-Milltek / #Milltek / #2016


    Milltek’s new exhaust system for the classic #Audi Ur #Quattro sounds simply sensational, but first they had to find a suitable example to fit it to…

    ‘The new #Milltek-Classic-exhaust-system offers great performance, exceptional fit and finish and a perfectly-judged sound enhancement...’

    There can be few features about the Ur quattro that don’t make reference to its unique combination of engine sound and exhaust note – the distinctive warbling, skirling off-beat cacophany that arises from the unusual 1-2-4-5-3 firing order of the turbocharged in-line five-cylinder engine.

    It’s the stuff of legend, with just about every quattro enthusiast having a story to tell of how, as a child or teenager, they were spellbound while watching the works rally cars charge through the Welsh forests, spitting gravel and flames in equal proportions…

    Those same impressionable youngsters are all grown up now and many have gone on to become quattro owners and enthusiasts (can there be anyone who’s an owner who isn’t an enthusiast?) Indeed, the Ur quattro now ranks among the most iconic of classic cars from that early Eighties era – uncommon enough to be very special, but not so rare and expensive as to be unobtainable – and the enthusiasm for the model remains undiminished.

    As a born again high-performance classic car it still looks fabulous and remains practical even today, still able to hold its own in the cut and thrust of modern motoring and likely to attract just as much attention in the pub car park as many expensive supercars.

    So it was no real surprise that, when the renowned exhaust specialist #Milltek-Sport launched a new initiative to produce a range of high-quality high-performance exhaust systems for the classic car market, the Ur quattro would be one of the first on their applications list.

    Although Milltek is known mostly for its extensive range of applications for the latest high-performance models, with the Volkswagen Group playing a huge part in its portfolio, the company has a long history that goes way back to the times when cars like the quattro were just emerging.


    Milltek’s founder, #Phil-Millington , began his long experience in the exhaust industry as manager of one of the country’s first exhaust centres in 1977 before taking over the running of a stainless-steel exhaust specialist in Devon, and then founding his own business – #Falcon-Exhausts – in #1983 , just about the time that the quattro was making its mark here in the UK market, the first time around.

    So, there was already a lot of experience in producing exhaust systems for a wide range of models that were contemporary at the time, but which are now the mainstay of the current classic car market. But it was never going to be a simple case of dusting off the original blueprints from the archives and reproducing the old systems. Although a high quality of construction had always been a strong point for the Falcon systems, there were also many ways in which Milltek’s latest advanced construction techniques and modern materials could be used to improve upon the design and manufacture.

    With the decision made to use an Audi Ur quattro as one of the first demo cars for the new initiative, the guys at Milltek set about finding a suitable example for long-term development and testing of the new revised system and for subsequent promotional purposes. And, let’s face it, who wouldn’t jump at the chance to own a quattro!

    After a bit of searching around, in August 2014 they sourced a suitable example, a #1988 model with the later spec 2.2-litre 10-valve #MB-turbo-engine . Finished in gleaming Alpine white – a colour which, after Tornado red perhaps, has to be one of the classic signatures for the Ur quattro – as soon as they saw it they knew it just had to be added to the Milltek fleet. Ironically, it was already fitted with an aftermarket stainless-steel exhaust, manufactured by a rival brand, but that didn’t put them off!

    Although very solid at first sight – indeed, it was widely admired when it first appeared on the Milltek Sport stand at Audi Driver International in October 2014 – perhaps inevitably, when they delved a bit deeper, it was found to need some bodywork restoration, and that task was entrusted to Simon Norman at 2Refinish, based in Hinckley, Leicestershire.

    A very thorough and top quality exercise followed throughout the early months of 2015, with the bodywork completely stripped and overhauled and treated to a glass-out respray, before it next appeared on the Milltek stand at the Classic Motor Show at the NEC , to be much admired and featured in our November issue.

    Of course, like any classic car of its age, there were also quite a few mechanical gremlins to be ironed out. Milltek’s Leigh Ravey tells us that he’s now picked up quite a bit of practical experience at troubleshooting the old K-Jetronic injection system and dealing with many of the idiosyncrasies of the older cars, none of which involve modern diagnostic techniques like reading fault codes…

    For instance, recalling a recurrent problem with the brake pedal switch and wiring that was shorting out, causing the brake lights to be on permanently, and dealing with an intermittently troublesome idle control valve, Leigh philosophically regards it as ‘the joys of old cars, I suppose!’

    The car now also has a new set of Bilstein dampers, H&R lowering springs, Powerflex bushes and, of course, its piéce de résistance – the new Milltek Classic exhaust system which, in their own words, is claimed to ‘offer great performance gains, exceptional fit and finish, a powerful but perfectlyjudged sound enhancement and a look that’s close to the original exhaust system but subtly enhanced, remaining faithful to the car’s iconic design’…


    This particular system is the louder non-resonated ‘downpipe-back’ application, which uses a 10V adapter pipe, connecting pipe, centre silencer bypass assembly, rear silencer assembly and polished tailpipe tips. The systems are also available in a slightly more restrained / subdued resonated form, and with other tailpipe assemblies, which include Titanium and Cerakote finishes as well as polished tips.

    As well as using top quality construction, with Type-304 aircraft grade 2.5-inch diameter (63.5 mm) stainless-steel pipework, mandrel-bent for optimum gasflow to ensure maximum performance throughout the rev-range, Milltek’s development engineers also took the opportunity to solve one of the original system’s weak points by adding a new mounting point.

    Although it requires drilling four holes in the boot floor to accommodate the new mounting, this is well worthwhile. It not only solves the age-old problem of the drooping rear silencer with its typically sagging tailpipes that no longer sit neatly in the aperture in the rear valance, but it also dramatically reduces movement of the rear silencer when cornering.

    The opportunity was also taken to revise the routeing of the pipework over the rear axle to ensure that no contact is made, preventing any chafing of the pipework itself as well as keeping exhaust heat away from the CV joint.

    Milltek Classic has also completed development of a version for the later 20V models; otherwise identical to the 10V version, it uses a different front adapter pipe. So, was it all worth it, given that there’s already plenty of aftermarket stainlesssteel exhaust systems available for the Ur quattro… Let’s just say that, while hanging out of the window of the camera car to get the driving shots for this feature, I just wish that there had been a way to capture and bottle the glorious sound that emanates from this exhaust system as the Milltek quattro accelerated and cruised past at 70 mph – it’d be a best-seller!

    Contacts Milltek Sport Unit 3 Victoria Way, Pride Park , Derby DE24 8AN Tel: 01332 227 280 / www.millteksport.com
    2Refinish Unit 35, Sketchley Meadows Ind. Estate, Hinckley, Leicetershire LE10 3ES Tel: 07885 674 484

    www.2refinish.com

    ‘ I just wish that there had been a way to capture and bottle the + glorious sound that emanates from this exhaust system...’


    ‘A very thorough and top quality exercise followed throughout the early months of 2015, with the bodywork completely stripped and overhauled and treated to a glass-out respray...’

    ‘After a bit of searching around, in August 2014 they sourced a suitable example, a 1988 model with the later spec 2.2-litre 10-valve MB turbo engine...’

    ‘So it was no real surprise that the Ur quattro would be one of the first on the applications list...’
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  •   Chris Rees reacted to this post about 4 years ago
    UR-QUATTRO Stunning, 380bhp #Quattro

    ORIGINAL QUATTRO

    This immaculate, 330bhp Ur-quattro has been owned by the same man for 23 years, and to think he almost sold it for an Evo 6… Words Davy Lewis. Photography AJ Walker.

    Sometimes you just find yourself in the right place at the right time. Whether it’s because the planets have aligned, or that lady luck is smiling down on you when the golden opportunity arises, the trick is to spot it and then grab it – fast. Nowhere is this more relevant than when it comes to buying a car.

    We’ve all seen the ‘perfect’ car appear in the classifieds. It might be that rare colour you’ve always wanted. It could be the exact list of options that excites you. It could be the price. But for many of us, it’s nothing more than a dream, as nine times out of ten, these things pop up when we can’t take advantage. You’ll always think back to the one that got away, the what-might-have-been. However, a lucky few are able to get their perfect car; and what’s more, hang onto it.

    John Edgar is no stranger to performance Audis and VWs. His garage boasts an enviable collection that includes an original and mint, Mk2 Golf GTi 16v, a supercharged Golf R32, a 460bhp B5 RS4 and the jewel of the collection, this stunning 20v quattro – a car he’s managed to love and cherish for over 23 years.

    “It started back in the 80s, when I was driving an Escort XR3i and I saw this car coming the other way towards me,” says John. “I thought to myself, one day, I’d like to get one of those.” It was of course a Ur-quattro, and, he began looking into getting one. He spotted a 10v for sale in his local paper and realised it was in his old hometown. “I arranged to view it and ended up buying it,” he recalls. “It became my daily for the next two years.” John fell in love with the boxy arches, that glorious five-cylinder grumble, and the way the quattro drive hooked up to the road. But when the 20v was announced, he was intrigued.

    “In 1990/91 I read about the new 20v quattro. It was getting great reviews in the press – even Jeremy Clarkson voted it car of the year,” comments John. So in 1992 he started looking for a 20v to buy. In those days there was no AutoTrader or indeed Internet, so the Sunday Times motoring supplement was where he spotted a quattro for sale. “The guy selling it was a haulage contractor and also had a Mercedes 190 Cosworth and Supra for sale, as well as the quattro – I think his business was in trouble,” says John. “It was 400 miles away from me, but it got the all clear from an AA inspection and I bought it a week later.”


    So how did the 20v compare to his previous 10v? “There was a big difference in performance,” enthuses John. “Especially when I had it chipped to 271bhp and 300lb/ft.” The quattro really got under his skin and was put to good use with some spirited drives in the Scottish highlands. But remember, at this stage, it was still fairly new, and John, like many of us, likes to change his cars regularly. It’s also worth bearing in mind that the Ur-quattro had not yet reached the semi-legendary status we know today.

    It was at this point that John had, what may be termed, a ‘moment of madness’. “I fancied a Mitsubishi Evo 6,” he says with a chuckle. If you think back to 1999 when the Japanese rally-rep was launched, it’s easy to see why he may have been tempted towards the dark side. With Tommi Makinen winning everything in the WRC version, the road car had masses of publicity. I’ve driven several and they are good fun – no doubt about it. However, 17 years later, there’s no doubt which car has stood the test of time. Fortunately for John, he made the right choice.

    “While I was thinking of getting an Evo, I took a work mate out in the quattro, and he said to me, ‘Why are you thinking of selling this? It’s amazing!’” With a reality check fully in place, John decided to steer clear of the Mitsi and stick with his quattro. You need only look at the regard with which these cars are now held (and indeed their value) to see that he made the right decision!

    Now he’d decided to keep the quattro, John wanted to give it a refresh. Having heard good things about Dialynx Performance, he took the car to the Swindon-based #Audi specialists, where it was treated to some goodies. A KKK 26 hybrid turbo was bolted on to the 2.2 five-pot, together with a bunch of RS2-spec upgrades including injectors, intercooler and exhaust manifold. With a 2.5 bar map sensor, Ramair filter and Dialynx de-cat pipe, the quattro made a very healthy 330bhp and 380lb/ft or torque – good by today’s standards, let alone at the turn of the Millennium.

    “My RS4 is running 460bhp, but when I take my missus out in the quattro she says it feels faster,” laughs John. This may be due to the way the power is delivered, the less refined nature of the older (and indeed lighter car) or, just down to that Ur magic that newer cars cannot recreate. Mind you, which of us wouldn’t love to have the choice of a stunning quattro or B5 RS4 every day…?

    In fact, the B5 was another fast Audi that John had spotted years before and made a resolution that one day he’d have. “We went on a tour to the Audi factory in Germany, and at the time, the RS4 hadn’t been launched. We saw a few lined up outside – I knew I’d have one – one day.”

    Cars like these are keepers. There are so few left, and fewer still in this amazing original condition that to sell it would be a crime.
    As John says, “It would have to be a ridiculous offer for me to even consider selling it.”

    John has been fastidious in maintaining this car and has tried hard to keep it as OEM-looking as possible. In fact, the only slight giveaways are the AP racing calipers and 300mm discs peeping out from behind the original 15in wheels (now wrapped in 225/50 Toyo rubber). With Goodridge lines and 5.1 fluid, this quattro now stops better than the original car ever could.

    The suspension has also been given a modern day refresh. A set of Koni adjustable dampers are joined by H&R springs, which offer a more sporty, yet compliant ride. There’s less pitch and roll, but the car retains its original character.

    These days the Ur is mainly used for shows, plus the odd special cross country drive that only those fortunate enough to live close to the quiet highland roads of Scotland can take advantage of. “I’m only 30 miles from Glasgow, then over the Erskine Bridge and the roads are empty,” says John.

    John tells me a story that sums up why these things are so special. “I was driving down to the VAG Tuner Expo and stopped at Scotch Corner services. A young lad of about ten shouted to his dad, ‘come and see this old square Audi.’ His dad, who’d just got out of his new Audi, just looked over and gave me a knowing smile.” There are few cars that can span a generation and fewer still that almost everyone has a soft spot for. There’ll never be another car like it – God bless the quattro!


    SPECIFICATION #Audi-Ur-quattro / #Audi-Ur-quattro / #Audi-Quattro / #KKK / #Audi /

    Engine 2.2 20v turbo, #KKK-23-turbo , RS2 exhaust manifold, RS2 intercooler, RS2 injectors, 2.5bar map sensor, #RamAir air filter, #Dialynx de-cat pipe.

    Power 330bhp and 380lb/ft

    Transmission 5-speed manual

    Brakes #AP-Racing calipers with 300mm drilled and grooved discs and APF 404 pads, Goodridge braided lines, Dot 5.1 fluid.

    Suspension #Koni adjustable dampers with #H&R springs

    Wheels and Tyres OEM 15in alloys with Toyo 225/50 tyres

    Interior OEM quattro

    Exterior OEM quattro in white

    Tuning contacts/thanks Keith at Dialynx Performance www.dialynx.co.uk Cummings

    Automotive, Glasgow for looking after the maintenance and my wife Bernadette for putting up with my obsession!

    Top: One of the most iconic rear ends around.

    Far left: Looks stunning in white Left: 20v lump has been tuned to 330bhp Bottom left to right: Interior is immaculate, includes digital dash.

    Top: Looks even better from the side Left: AP Racing brakes make a big difference Above: All about the Quattro.
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  •   Chris Rees reacted to this post about 4 years ago
    EX-MANSELL 1984 WR / Restoration – Nigel Mansell’s 1984 WR quattro
    RESTORATION – #1984 #Audi-Ur-quattro MAIN PHOTOS: NEIL BIRKITT #Quattro resto / #Audi-Quattro / #Audi / #Nigel-Mansell /

    This superbly restored #1984 quattro is not only a testament to the professional skills of Malvern’s Andy Ridley, but it also has a famous original owner…

    It might not always have been worth the effort, but there can be no doubt that, these days, restoring a car like the classic Ur quattro is a thoroughly worthwhile exercise, given that prices of prime examples have gradually risen over the years. That appreciation has been aided no doubt by stardom in retro TV series like the ‘Ashes to Ashes’ cop drama and of course the continuing enthusiasm for the heyday of rallying when the Audi quattro dominated the World Rally Championship in the mid-Eighties.

    The incredible six-figure sums now being commanded by genuine ex-rally cars or the limited number of original short-wheelbase Sport quattros will only have reinforced the values of the original Ur quattro, and even the related Series 2 80 Saloon and Coupé quattro are now highly regarded as classics when once they would just have been cheap secondhand cars.

    Just about anyone of a certain age, when asked about their enthusiasm for the quattro, will begin by waxing lyrical about how as a child or teenager they were inspired by seeing the quattro storm through the Welsh forests on the RAC Rally, or some such similar anecdote, and it’s that nostalgia for a long-lost age that drives many more mature classic car enthusiasts to seek out examples of the cars that they lusted after in their youth, but couldn’t afford at the time.

    The problem now, of course, is that well preserved low-mileage genuine original cars are very few and far between and the dilemma, if you should find one, is that you can’t really use it without the risk of undermining the very reason you bought it in the first place. Driving a valuable original classic car on busy modern roads is just fraught with danger and the value of that low mileage won’t stay that way for long if you drive it too often or too far.

    So, the alternative is to seek out a worthy candidate for a restoration project, to find a sorry, neglected example that has lain unattended for many years and whose owner has lost interest or the wherewithal to re-commission it themselves. Sadly, there are many examples just like this that have been parked up under tarpaulins in backyards and left to moulder away by owners who are labouring under the delusion that they’ll get around to restoring it one day, but never do…


    That wasn’t a problem, though for Andy Ridley from Malvern when he first heard from a ‘friend of a friend’ about this 1984 Ur quattro that was languishing behind a shed in the back yard of a house in Martley, Worcestershire. It had been laid up for eight years after suffering accident damage to the driver’s side door and rear wheel arch and had slowly been fading away, its once proud Tornado red paintwork now sun bleached and jaded and with rust starting to take hold in the nooks and crannies of the surviving bodywork.


    The chassis number confirms it to have been built on March 31, 1984 and the guy who owned it was only the second registered keeper, having bought it in December 1992 and registered it with an age-related plate featuring his initials; prior to that it’d only had one former keeper since it was first registered in the UK in February 1985. This is where it gets interesting, because it appears from the supporting documents that it was previously registered and / or used overseas and that the original owner was none other than a Mr. Nigel Ernest James Mansell of Port Erin on the Isle of Man, as detailed in a registration document and even an Isle of Man tax disc with his name and address on it.


    Yes indeed, it was the very same Nigel Mansell who dominated Formula 1 throughout the Eighties and early Nineties, with no less than 31 Grand Prix victories to his name, and who won both the Formula 1 World Championship in 1992 and the CART Indy car World Series the following year, becoming the only person to hold both titles simultaneously.

    It was much earlier in his career, though, that he became associated with this Audi quattro, and the belief is that he bought it when he left Lotus at the end of the 1984 season and was signed by Frank Williams to drive alongside Keke Rosberg as part of the Williams F1 team for the 1985 season. What better way to celebrate such a good career move than by buying one of the most prestigious fast-road cars on the market at that time, one that was perfectly practical for commuting between the home and the race track…

    In fact, it was at about this same time that another young man first began pursuing his career in the automotive industry when, in 1984, Malvern Rugby Club player Andy Ridley founded Forward Motors in premises near Upton Marina. The business quickly became known for quality services and exceptional customer satisfaction and it grew from there, before moving into the current premises in Malvern.

    Over the following years Andy Ridley’s experience and skill developed further and his business gained an enviable reputation for high-quality body and paintwork, from accident repairs through to full-blown restorations as well as all sorts of mechanical work from routine servicing to full engine rebuilds.


    Clearly not content with working on customer cars day in and day out, Andy also took on the occasional personal project and it was not long after he’d finished a full nut and bolt rebuild on a Golf Rallye that he heard about the wrecked ’84 quattro and then spent more than four months carrying out an almost bare shell rebuild.

    As the photos show, the bodyshell was completely gutted and stripped and the damaged and rusty metal was cut out and replaced. That rear quarter panel and wing was the most difficult to deal with, due to the combination of the physical damage and the ravages of rust, but Andy cut away all the bad metal and constructed his own panels by careful reference to the nearside of the car and swaged the new panels into place, often working late into the night to achieve a perfect finish to his own satisfaction without resorting to excessive filling and sanding, as so many do.


    Both front wings were beyond repair and had to be replaced, which shouldn’t have been a problem since this was about the time that Audi had commissioned a fresh batch of new steel wings to be made. But those original presses were clearly badly worn out and the genuine Audi front wings were horribly out of shape. What should have been a simple bolt-on job turned into a nightmare and it took about 20 hours of fettling and reshaping to get them to fit and line up properly.

    With the bodywork completely stripped and made good, it was into the paint booth for a fresh coat – several, in fact – of Tornado red before the long and painstaking process of reconditioning and replacing all the mechanical parts and refitting all the trim and interior.

    The original WR series engine was completely rebuilt, from the reground crankshaft upwards, with almost everything to standard specification, although a new Dialynx exhaust manifold and Milltek Sport stainless-steel exhaust system were chosen over the original components, and the inlet manifold was welded after it had cracked. The radiator was re-cored and the intercooler repaired, and it was fitted with a new clutch and flywheel.

    As you can see from the photographs of the engine bay, a great deal of time and effort also went into refinishing and painting all the components, with the end result that the car is not far off of a concours standard of presentation.

    All the suspension and running gear was completely overhauled and rebuilt with all new bearings, bushings and balljoints and if there was the slightest doubt about the serviceability of any component Andy fitted a brand-new genuine part rather than risk skimping on anything. In fact, in total he reckons to have spent around £15,000 on new parts alone, mostly from local VW-Audi parts supplier Deutscheparts, but also from Audi spares specialist quattro corner and the local Gloucester branch of TPS.


    The interior was also re-trimmed in the original fabric and the digital dash was sent away to be recommissioned, and it now works perfectly in every respect, a rare thing these days, although it’s a mixed blessing – every time we started it up to move it around the workshop for our photoshoot came the commanding reminder that, with only a couple of gallons left in the tank, it needed to be refuelled!



    The final touch was to have the alloy wheels refurbished and fitted with new tyres, Dunlop SP Sport in the proper size. As you can see, these are the later 8 x 15-inch Ronal R8 rims rather than the 6 x 15s that the ’84 model would originally have worn but, along with the later 20V steering wheel that Andy has fitted out of personal preference, it’s a minor deviation from standard specification and perfectly in keeping with the nature of the car. Most significantly, it’s a couple of years now since Andy finished the restoration and the car is still looking perfect in every way – not a hint of imperfection in the paint or trim and a true testament to the quality of the original restoration work. Even more creditable when you consider that virtually every part of the job, apart from very specialist services like regrinding the crank, setting up the fuel injection and repairing the digital dash, has been carried out in-house at Forward Motors, invariably by Andy himself labouring late into the night, after a full day’s work.

    As is so often the case, Andy is now looking forward (no pun intended) to the challenge of his next restoration project and reluctantly agreed that the quattro might be for sale, at the right price and to the right person. Given the amount of work that has gone into it and the quality of the finished product you’d need to be talking at around the £30,000 mark, but it would be worth every penny, even without the extra pedigree of its illustrious original owner…

    ‘It’s a couple of years now since Andy finished the restoration and it still looks perfect in every way...’

    Forward Motors Ltd.

    Providin g top quality car repairs to Worcester, Malvern, Bromyard, Ledbury, Upton upon Severn, Tewkesbury and beyond for over 30 years, Forward Motors was founded in 1984 by Malvern Rugby Club player Andy Ridley. Originally established in premises near Upton Marina, the business quickly became known for quality services and exceptional customer satisfaction and is now located in a purpose built garage and workshop in Malvern.


    Services include accident repair and bodywork, resprays and refinishing; any job from complete rebuilds to dent removal, wheel repairs or scratch and chip repairs, and Forward Motors can provide anything from a quick, convenient service for slight damage, to day-to-day repairs as well as restoring classic cars, if you have an older car that needs bringing back to its former glory.

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  •   Chris Rees reacted to this post about 4 years ago
    RETRO – UR quattro #1984 / #1987 #Audi-Quattro F , G, H… / #Audi-Quattro-F / #Audi-Quattro-G / #Audi-Quattro-H / #Audi-Ur-quattro / #Audi /

    Darron Edwards continues his account of the development of the Ur quattro, with a look at the F, G and H series models between 1984 and 1987…

    Cosmetically, the Ur quattro had remained virtually unchanged since its introduction in 1980, but all that changed in 1984 when both the interior and exterior of the car received some subtle upgrades that made all the difference. Bringing the quattro right up to date, most of these changes remained until the final incarnation of the car seven years later.

    The three chassis types that spanned 1984 to 1987 were the last to use the tried and tested 200 PS ‘WR’ engine and so this was the most settled period of Ur #Quattro production, when the car remained virtually unchanged, inside and out.

    The #Audi-Quattro-FA chassis was introduced in August 1984 and the cosmetic changes were obvious straight away, with the front and rear end of the car receiving a more modern look. At the front, the one-piece Cibie headlights were retained but they now had sloping glass lenses, coupled with a re-designed sloping front grille and headlight trims. This gave the front end a much more streamlined look and it did indeed improve the aerodynamic co-efficient of the car.

    At the rear, a revolutionary design was used, with the tail lights now ‘smoked’ black. A very clever manufacturing process was used, where the lights appeared black from a distance but closer inspection shows that a coloured shroud covered the bulb so that, when it illuminated, the lens would appear to change colour briefly.

    The prismatic strip that runs horizontally across the lower part of the boot lid also received the smoked black treatment, while the top of the boot lid which up until now had been painted satin black, regardless of body colour, was now painted the same colour as the rest of the car.

    The rear skirt that surrounds the bumper was also re-designed and it now had an integrated mudguard to prevent dirt spraying up the side of the car from the wider 8-inch wheels.

    Another revolutionary design on this model was the use of flexible additive in the paint that was applied to the rear rubber spoiler. This meant that it could be colourcoded and, together with all the other new features, it gave the rear end of the car a radical and more modern new look. This new look was eventually copied by most motor manufacturers on a wide variety of cars and even the Ford Capri would get its own version of smoked rear lights and prismatic rear panels were offered as aftermarket accessories for many models.


    Up until now, the rear badging had been achieved by the use of dot matrix decals, finished in either silver or black (dependent on body colour) manufactured by 3M. These were replaced by new three-dimensional plastic badges, with a chrome or black finish. The size and shape of the font used was the same, but the position of both the ‘Audi’ and the ‘quattro’ badge was raised slightly compared to the original decals.

    A new range of body colours was introduced in 1984, with Mars red now replaced by a deeper and more striking red called Tornado red. It suited the new cosmetic changes very well and became the definitive colour of this period of Ur quattro production.

    The decals in the rear side windows were also re-designed. They were originally silver dot matrix, but from the FA chassis and up until the JA they were now a dark brown colour and of a hollow / outline design. This was done to match the rear de-mister that bore the ‘quattro’ legend – when the rear screen element was heated, the famous name would melt the ice and slowly appear in the rear window. A very cool touch!

    Inside the car, a new look was also applied. Brown was now replaced by black, and plenty of it! The new dashboard that made its debut on the previous model was now finished in black vinyl to match the new carpet and other interior trim. It had a new centre console panel that now featured an oil temperature gauge and voltmeter and also a neat two-stage, rotary diff lock switch that illuminated two green LE Ds set in a graphic of the quattro drivetrain.

    A smart grey tartan cloth with a fine red and blue pinstripe was introduced for the front and rear seats and this new cloth was also applied to the front door panels and rear quarter trim. It was coded ZN and called ‘Graphite Eton Flannel’. This is my personal favourite interior trim and was fairly hard-wearing, apart from the upright bolster on the driver’s seat. I regularly repair these with a new black cloth panel.

    The digital dash that was fitted from 1984 was now green. On some cars you could alter the way that the rev pointer appeared. It was possible to switch between a dual finger pointer or a ‘snail trail’ type pointer. This could be done by selecting ‘fuel range’ on the MFD and then holding down the re-set button on the computer switch. The revcounter, clock and gauges could also be turned off by pushing in the dash dimmer switch, although this is a feature that I’ve seldom used. This new system replaced the turquoise coloured digi-dash unit from the previous car. The handbrake warning light was also removed from the driver’s side under panel and now fitted in the binnacle.

    The wiper stalk on the steering column now only moves up for wiper selection (early quattros had the intermittent position down one click). First position is now for intermittent wipers and then the next two clicks for slow and fast wipe. This newly designed stalk also contained the switch to operate the voice check system.

    Most G and H chassis cars were fitted with the standard tilt sunroof. This could be tilted by 25 degrees or, by pulling two clips, completely removed and stored on two special runners in the boot. It’s worth noting that most FA chassis cars that I’ve seen don’t have a sunroof.


    With the introduction of the HA chassis came a couple more safety improvements. The front brake callipers were redesigned and the front brake discs enlarged. The callipers were now twin piston – a big improvement on the previous single-pot units. The discs were thicker and larger to complement the new callipers.

    The second safety improvement was the introduction of twin side light and brake light bulbs in the rear light clusters. This was done without the need for new rear light units. A simple modification to the bulb holders was enough to greatly improve the visibility of the brake lights, especially as the rear lenses were now black.

    As far as spare parts are concerned, these three chassis are probably the easiest of all quattros to source parts for as they were the most numerous of all Ur quattros. I own two #Audi-Quattro-GA chassis cars and I love driving them – I feel completely at home in their comfortable interior and I enjoy the green digital dash. This was obviously not the case for everybody, though, as Audi would change all this in the next incarnation of the Ur quattro...

    Above: New green digital dash. Above right: Twin brake light bulbs in the rear cluster for the #Audi-Quattro-HA chassis improved their visibility greatly. Below: GA chassis.

    Left: FA chassis models featured a revised interior, with ‘Graphite Eton Flannel’ cloth on the seats and door panels, a black vinyl dashboard to match the black carpets and other interior trim and a new centre console panel... Above: The new console panel included an oil temperature gauge, voltmeter and a neat rotary control for the diff lock featuring green LEDs in the graphic of the quattro drivetrain.

    ‘Tornado red became the definitive colour of this period of Ur quattro production...’

    Left: New rear-end from 1984 featured ‘smoked’ rear lenses and prismatic strip. Also note new three-dimensional badging. Above: The top of the boot lid was painted body colour, instead of the satin black of previous models, along with the rear rubber spoiler whose paint featured a flexible additive.

    ‘The FA chassis was introduced in August #1984 and the cosmetic changes were obvious straight away...’
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