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Ford Capri PRICE RANGE £3000-22,500 Increasingly popular with a new generation of enthusiasts captivated by the Capr...
Ford Capri PRICE RANGE £3000-22,500

Increasingly popular with a new generation of enthusiasts captivated by the Capri’s image and user-friendliness, there’s a good selection to be had. Yet despite that availability, prices are on the rise not only for the late 2.8 injection and earlier 3.0-litre cars, but the four-pot models, too. In particular, the Series Two model in all forms is highly prized by aficionados. ACA sold two 1974 3.0-litre Ghias for £11,235 and £11,550, while Silverstone auctioned a beautifully-restored 1980 3.0S for a highly commendable £22,500 and a low-mileage 1978 3.0S for £23,625. Ample evidence that four cylinder models are on the up came again from ACA with a 1973 1600XL that was hammered away for £10,815. ‘The Car You Always Promised Yourself ’ was the advertising line, but if you want to fulfil that youthful promise for a reasonable price, then you’d better get a move on.
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  •   Simon Woolley reacted to this post about 1 year ago
    CAPRI RAISED FROM THE DEPTHS / #Ford-Capri / #Ford

    Police frogmen recover #1982 #Ford-Capri-MkIII – now the search is on to find owner

    A special edition Ford Capri has been dragged out of the bottom of a lake after it was discovered by staff at a watersports centre in Nottinghamshire. The 1982 MkIII Calypso was discovered by employees of the National Water Sports Centre at Holme Pierrepont, and was recovered from the water by a diving team from Nottinghamshire Police. DS Nick Sawdon, one of the officers who worked on the car’s recovery, said: ‘I’ve been on the team since 1997 and I’ve never known a car go in there before. When we first saw it in the gloom of the lake all we could say was that it was probably a large dark saloon. It was a surprise to find it was a Ford Capri. ‘The recovery was quite a challenge – we treated it as a pretty good work out for our training day. The car was half full of sand so we had to use lifting bags and winches to recover it.’

    It is not known how long the car, which was registered in 1982, has been in the lake. Police – who have not released the registration number – have been unable thus far to trace the owner of the Calypso, a special edition based on the 1.6LS and originally offered through the Ford franchised dealer network with two-tone paintwork. According to the #DVLA , a total of 52 are left, including cars currently on #SORN . #Nottinghamshire #Police spokesman Neil Graham said: ‘It may be difficult to find the owner, given how many years the Capri has been down there. If it has been stolen then we may still have it on our records, in which case we might be able to return the car.’

    Sam Skelton

    DO YOU REMEMBER THIS CAPRI?

    If you’re the rightful owner of the submerged Ford Capri – or know who might be – we’d like to hear from you. Get in touch by sending an email to us.

    So far Nottinghamshire Police have been unable to trace the submerged Capri’s owner.
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  •   Simon Woolley reacted to this post about 1 year ago
    A BARGAIN COUPÉ BIRTHDAY GIFT

    CAR #Ford-Capri-2.8i / #Ford /
    Name Billy McCreath (car’s name Colin)
    First classic #1981 #Ford-Capri 2.8i (my only one so far)
    Dream classic E-type Jaguar
    Daily driver BMW 2.0d Touring
    Favourite driving song The Professionals theme, of course


    When I hit the big six-oh in April 2012, I was driven – as all males are on their 60th birthday – by a desire to buy an ‘Old Fartmobile’. You know the type of thing – Suzuki Wagon R, Vauxhall Meriva etc – but I decided to resist these urges and instead bought what I considered to be the opposite: a Ford Capri 2.8 injection, originally sold in November 1981 to a very fortunate motorist in Chelmsford.

    When new, it would have cost £8292.78 on the road, including an extra £175 for two-tone metallic paint and £37.78 for tinted glass – which is about £30k in 2013 money. Compared to other cars available at the time this was good value for a great-looking car with 160bhp.

    I adore driving my Capri and have lost count of the number of thumbs-ups that I’ve had from other motorists in my first 4000 miles of ownership. I try to drive it at least once a week and avoid leaving it stationary for longer than 14 days.

    When it’s parked, people show a lot of affection towards the car and very often a comment will be made about a Capri in a person’s life – sometimes they have owned one, other times it’s been a relative, and if it was a former boyfriend ladies tend to get all nostalgic about the rear seats for some reason...

    ‘Colin’ still has that lovely metallic old-car aroma, detectable before the door has been opened, even after 32 years and a restoration.


    I was a member of Capri Club Scotland for about six weeks before I was fortunate enough to become a Capri owner in July 2012. They are a great bunch of boys and girls at CCS, and classic runs are most enjoyable up here in Scotland with our great roads and countryside to enjoy. I was particularly pleased when Colin appeared in the club calendar for March 2013. I have zero mechanical ability, so I had to buy a very good car because if there were any problems it would be a trip to the local garage, which I have dealt with for more than 40 years, for repairs to be done. I didn’t want a perfect car because that might have made me reluctant to drive it too much or worry about it getting wet, dirty or – heaven forbid – receiving a stonechip.

    Colin had been restored at the time of purchase, probably at a cost far exceeding the price, but it is a standard car with no modifications and has the original ‘pepperpot’ alloys, which I love. Each to their own but I just don’t get the whole modification thing – loud exhaust, lowered suspension, more powerful engine and all of that. When I drive I get an experience that’s identical to that enjoyed by the original owner, and surely this is what classic cars are bought for? I may have gone too far, however, by wearing my dad’s old gold-rimmed ’80s sunglasses with mirrored lenses, plus vintage driving gloves. Every mile is a delight and quiet country roads are best, but even on the motorway there are many smiles per mile. Often other road users will tuck in behind to get a good look then overtake slowly.


    Values are remarkably low when you consider the amount of affection and nostalgia generated by a Capri, and with no depreciation and cheap classic insurance it makes a great buy for those of limited means. My fuel consumption varies from 21-28mpg, which is affordable for a few thousand annual miles, and while a rattle would be annoying in a modern car, in a classic it’s just part of the charm! I hope that I never have to part with it.

    ‘I adore driving it, and have lost count of the number of thumbs-ups I’ve received from other motorists’

    ‘Colin the Capri’ poses in front of the River Clyde, shortly after purchase. Right: shot chosen for ‘March’ in the Capri Club Scotland’s 2013 calendar.

    Interior is unchanged since the car left the factory. Below, l-r: V6 is unmodified; at a Bridge of Allan classic show.
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  •   Simon Woolley reacted to this post about 1 year ago
    Not seen in these pages for over four years, John Barker’s Mk1 Capri and its 5.3 litres of V8 are back!
    Car: #Ford-Capri-V8 / #Ford-Capri-Mk1 / #Ford-Capri / #Ford / #V8 / #Ford-Capri-V8-Mk1 / #Ford-Capri-5.3

    WELCOME BACK

    Let’s get the most frequently asked question out of the way up front: ‘Is it finished?’

    Well, that depends on what you mean by ‘finished’. This month I fitted the final component, the driver’s door card. There wasn’t one with the car when I bought it back in 2001, when it was a partially disassembled 1600GT in Modena Green (that’s a colour, not a place) with a black vinyl roof, so I’ve been looking for one for a long time.

    Happily, there’s now a company, Aldridge Trimming, making new door cards for all sorts of cars, including early Capris. But that door card nearly didn’t get fitted…

    For a long time, there were three #V8-engined Capris in Oundle (I know!), but now there are only two. Qprep, which does a great job of looking after mine, had another booked in for a bit of work. Late one afternoon at the back end of last year, it arrived and was driven into the workshop, at which point, unfortunately, an under-bonnet fire broke out. It caught quickly, extinguishers were ineffective, and the bonnet was too hot to push the car out. Sadly, it burned out, devastating the workshop.

    I’m glad to say that despite this massive setback, Qprep has resumed business. A great deal of stock had to be skipped and the whole place has been completely refurbished and looks better than ever. Amazingly, the Capri door card was just a couple of yards from the fire, in its cardboard packaging, yet was untouched. It’s now been fitted, along with the replica Springalex RS steering wheel I’d promised myself, so from an inventory perspective the car is finished.

    It is, however, a project car, so there is some stuff I’d still like to do, and that includes driving it a bit, which I’ve been rubbish at. I am ashamed to say that it hasn’t exactly ‘racked up’ the miles since the last report. In fact, if my nearest MOT station were 50 miles away rather than just around the corner, it would have accrued more miles.

    My last running report, way back in issue 179, showed the Capri had covered 1847 miles. The odometer now reads like the date it will be ‘finished’ – 2039. The longest trips have been to Blyton Park for the launch day of the circuit and, last year, to Brands Hatch, where my mate Andy Noble runs his business, Sevens and Classics.

    Those of you with long memories will recall that in that last running report, in February 2013, Proflex had just delivered replacement suspension damper struts. From the outset, the Capri was intended to be a fast-road/trackday car, so quite why the lads that built it asked Proflex to supply forestspec dampers is beyond me. The combination of 15-inch wheels (not the usual 13s that rally Escorts wear) and a lowered ride height meant that the dampers were not operating in the right portion of their travel. So the damper struts were returned to Proflex to be reworked and, as technology has moved on since these parts were originally supplied in 2003, the dampers were re-specced, recommissioned and returned with three-way adjustment, rather than two-way. They also came back with the requested adjustable strut tops, giving more geometry options.
    The suggested road setup from Proflex has proved very good, with lots more low-speed compliance, more effectively controlled travel and a balance that’s loading the rear more, for traction, which is in short supply with 320lb ft available. There’s a clip on evo’s Instagram account, @officialevomagazine, taken at some bends local to me on a nippy morning.

    The Capri had a competition debut, too. Sort of. In December 2015 it was the course-opening car for the second Oundle Classic Sprint. Sadly, by lunchtime it had got a bit hot and bothered with all the hanging around and refused to go again. So it went back to Qprep, who solved the mystery by changing all the plugs and finding that there was no gap on the hardest one to get to, and so the last plug, obviously!

    I’m pleased to report that the 5.3-litre Rover V8 has since felt reinvigorated – stronger, smoother and more responsive than it had for a while. It’s still only managing 20mpg at best, but it does turn that petrol into delicious heaps of torque and lashings of woofly noise.

    ‘It is a project car, so there is some stuff I’d still like to do, and that includes driving it a bit’

    Far left: monster V8 is good for 320lb ft of torque. Left: Springalex RS steering wheel looks the part in the Capri’s spartan cabin. Right: the final touch: fitting the door card at Qprep

    Date acquired October 2001
    Total mileage 2039
    Mileage this month 122
    Costs this month £0
    Mpg this month around 15mpg
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  •   Andy Everett reacted to this post about 4 years ago
    DRAMA CLASSES RACING FORD CAPRIS

    Willie Green teaches Robert Coucher a thing or two. Robert Coucher meets racer Willie Green at Silverstone to learn how to handle some very hairy #Ford Capris.

    Northamptonshire, England. And it's winter. I'm driving towards Silverstone Motor Circuit, 'The Home of British Motorsport', and feel distinctly ill. It's down to nerves, for two specific reasons. First, heavy black clouds are billowing in and rain is most definitely on the way. Second, I'm due to meet up with race ace Willie Green, who has promised to show me the way around Silverstone in his trackday car. I feel the strong need for a cigarette, even though I gave up smoking years ago.

    As you probably know, Willie Green is a racing driver of the first order. He's competed in more than 1500 races and has won about 600 or 700 of them, not that he keeps an accurate tally. Hailing from a wealthy textile family in Derbyshire, Willie has been racing since the 1960s and has driven everything from a Daytona at Le Mans to numerous D-types, #Ferrari GTOs, GT40s and Maserati 250Fs (he's a maestro in any of those), and he really made his name winning in the JCB 512M Ferrari in the wet at #Silverstone in #1972 , besting a #Porsche-917 . He's an extremely competitive racing driver, who, no doubt, does not suffer fools. At all. Maybe I shouldn't mention the fact that the last time I raced at Silverstone, I crashed at Becketts Comer...

    I arrive at the old pits and the circuit is bustling and busy. This is an RMA Trackday and the garages are full of exciting cars, ranging from Porsche 911s and a bunch of Audi R8s to track-focussed Radicals and Ariel Atoms as well as pure racers. I'm looking out for Peter Whelan and his brace of racing Capris: the Hermetite Group 1 car and a Group 2 RS2600. Peter has also invited me to join the shakedown of his Capris with Willie. How generous.

    ‘I LOVE CAPRIS AND HAVE HAD PLENTY OF THEM. THEY ARE BRILLIANT ON A CIRCUIT’
    - WILLIE GREEN

    Above and right. Racer Willie Green has long been a Capri advocate. This one is lighter, lower, more stiffly sprung and features twin-cam 24-valve Cosworth V6 in place of the old 2.8 OHV. Oversteer aplenty for those who can handle it.

    In the 1960s, the only vaguely sporting Ford on sale in Britain was the #Cortina . Affectionately known as the Dagenham Dustbin, it was very popular but Ford realised that a more stylish, money-spinning sidekick was due. In America the Ford Mustang was launched in April #1964 . It was a hit with younger drivers thanks to its sporting appeal and went on to sell two million examples in two years and set a sales record that stood for 20 years. In #1965 Project Colt was initiated for the British market: the #Ford-Capri .

    Led by John Hitchman, a team of British engineers had prototypes running by #1966 in Boreham, Essex, using prosaic 1.3- and 1.6-litre engines and gearboxes from the Cortina. Launched on 24 January 1969, the #Capri was billed as 'The car you always promised yourself'. And it proved to be an immediate sensation. Over the next 18 years nearly two million Capris were sold in the UK, Europe and America, and it remained in the top ten best-selling cars 11 years after launch.

    It was even popular in Germany, where it became known as the #Maurer-Porsche : the 'bricklayer's Porsche'. In Britain it became infamous for its habit of leaving the road at speed thanks to its supposedly wayward live rear axle, though that reputation was likely due more to over-enthusiastic young drivers.

    'I love Capris and have had plenty of them. They are brilliant on a circuit,' says a slightly prickly Willie Green when I mention the oversteer issue. 'The idea that they don't handle is nonsense. This one is a #1982 2.8 and is fantastic. I have fitted a 2.9-litre 24-valve Granada Cosworth engine, which puts out more than 200bhp, and dropped it all-round on stiffer springs at the front with shorter dampers and de-cambered rear leaf springs. I've fitted uprated front discs, a limited-slip diff, cage and safety fuel cell, and that's about it. It's done 27,0 miles of trackdays and all I have done is change the plugs. Oh good, it's started raining. Put on a helmet and let's go!'

    With me strapped firmly into the suicide seat, Willie fires up his standard-looking British Racing Green - or should that be BRDC Green - Capri and we head out onto the circuit. He winds the car up for a sighting lap, then switches into full tuition mode over the headphones.

    'Silverstone is a great circuit but it is fast and technical,' he says. Going extremely swiftly indeed, Willie then says: 'I tend to enter corners more slowly. If you go in too fast you can end up coming out too slow. Historic cars with limited brakes and unsophisticated chassis need to be sorted out before the corner... You want to get the car turned in and then feed in as much power as it will transmit at the apex... Don't forget, if you make a fast exit you carry the speed all the way up the next straight.'

    All sounds bleedin' obvious but Willie's idea of 'slow in' is somewhat different to mine. Yet I'm amazed at his smoothness and how he then absolutely powers the Capri through on the exits. 'I like to get the car onto the edge and keep it there so I know where I am. In that way there are no surprises.'

    Suddenly we are into Copse Comer, which he says is 'interesting. You want to turn in early... the apex is on the way to the corner at the end of the pitlane and then it opens out. Now we are coming into Becketts, where you can do a Scandinavian flick [at this point I forget what happens next: think there was a rumble strip involved, sideways], then down the Hangar Straight to Stowe, which is fast and enjoyable. Take a late entry and don't turn until you have run completely out of road. Club Corner has changed... be careful... the concrete wall is magnetic! Abbey is great, I love it... really fast. Now, get the silly hairpins out of the way and coming into Brooklands you don't want to be too far right, you have to get it back for Luffield which has twice as much grip on the outside in the wet. OK, flat out through Woodcote, which can be a bit bumpy...'

    With apologies to Willie Green, this is an approximation of Silverstone from the passenger seat of his Ford Capri at racing speed. Well, what I remember with my eyes wide shut. But it's not entirely what I'm expecting. Searing speed, yes. Perfect car control, sure. But a good degree of gentleness and patience, some waiting time to allow the car to gather itself up, with light, minutely judged fingertip inputs? No. And the sheer mechanical grip from the Capri's Toyo 888 tyres and communicative balance from that simple, leaf-sprung chassis? Definitely not.

    This is a lesson in dancing a car around a wet circuit in total control, on the edge, but never over the ragged edge. Certainly Willie is the master of the controlled slide but he does not showboat just for the sake of it, because that's never the fastest way.

    Willie has retired from top-line single-seater racing but he is still on-it. I forgot to mention how we went past a track-missile Atom on the outside of one of the wet corners, hovered up numerous M-badged BMWs and other fast racing cars, and were about to lunch a 6.3 #AMG #Mercedes until the red flag came out because someone had gone off (again) in the rain.

    'What I really enjoy these days is teaching. I love to see people improve. Right: now it's your turn,' says Willie. I strap into the firm driver's bucket seat; the Capri starts with a growl, but it is not noisy. The clutch is light and the five-speed gearshift is pleasant, even though the earlier four-speed is supposed to be better. As the rain abates, I'm out on the circuit with Willie telling me what to do over the headphones. I start tentatively, feeling like a kid learning to ride a bicycle as he eggs me on.

    'Come on, it will take it. Turn in and now add the power on the apex. Now more speed. Keep it flat here, good, now brake gently. Wait, wait, wait, now throttle and let it run wide, it can take more; come on, more speed, that's it...'

    Still going less-than-quickly, a few laps with Willie improve my overall performance significantly. He doesn't bully or harass but remains calm and encouraging all the way. He's patient and gets more excited than me when I get a few of the comers just right. Issuing terse but accurate instructions, the man is an excellent teacher. 'You need to learn the circuit but at least you listen and you've improved a good deal,' he says.
    I'm more than happy with that.

    Back in the garage, it's time to recover and let the pulse rate subside. I pull up a chair for coffee with owner Peter Whelan, racer Mark Waghom and author/historian Peter Darley. Mark raced Peter's Group 1 Capri at last year's Goodwood Member's Meeting, where the tin-tops proved a real hit. 'The Hermetite Recreation Group 1 car is a #1978 model driven in period by Holman Blackburn, who was the sponsor,' says Peter.

    It, too, looks pretty stock apart from the nicely presented racing colours. It has a 3.0-litre Essex V6 engine, uprated to 200bhp thanks to a huge twin-choke Weber carburettor and better breathing. The black alloys are shod with slightly wider 205/15 tyres and the interior is fully stripped, but equipped with a cage and large fire extinguisher.

    Peter suggests I take it out next. The racing bucket is set low and doesn't adjust. The Weber carb needs a bit of a tickle before the engine will start but as soon as it fires the Essex V6 is abundantly rev-happy, which is unusual because they are normally somewhat short of breath. Again the clutch is light but the gearshift is not particularly precise. Get past the carb's fluffiness and the recalcitrance of the high-lift cam and the engine properly ignites. On the track it is noisier than Willie's track car, with sharper reactions thanks to its full race set-up. And the handling is a delight.

    Following Willie's advice I go into corners none-too-quickly but power though the apexes. The Capri is on-side and benign. Through the hairpins the track is very wet and at one point the car begins to slide, so I just lift off, let it come together, then ease on the power again, gently. This is the obedient sort of front-engined, rear-wheel-drive car we would all like to race because of its friendly nature.

    Above and top left This is the real deal, a full-on racebred Capri rather than a road car adapted for track use: one of Ford’s own homologation replicas of the 1972 works Le Manscar.

    The rain is coming down hard now so really it's pros only for Peter Whelan's ferocious-looking #RS2600 - 319bhp on slick tyres! It is an original 1972 RS2600, built as an exact replica of the 1972 works Le Mans car, number 53, that was raced by Jochen Mass and Hans Stuck. It has an original, authenticated, fuel-injected Weslake engine, which was found in Spain, as bought by its then-owner as a spare, directly from Ford via Peter Ashcroft, Ford's competitions manager.

    The ever-energetic Willie dashes over and instructs me to get into the passenger seat of the Weslake monster, never mind the bucketing rain. He jumps in and guns the ferocious- sounding V6. Then the 900kg lightweight is off and attacking Silverstone. Willie's arms are whirling around at speed and his foot is playing the reactive throttle pedal as he tries to throw all 319bhp at the greasy track. The racer is flying even though the angle of attack into some of the comers is a full 45° to the direction of travel, but he's careful to keep off the painted and slippery rumble strips.

    As the line dries, Willie applies the horses ever more firmly and the thoroughbred racer hooks up and comes on song. The stonking Weslake engine is on an entirely different level to the two previous Capri V6s. And yes, it's shod with (gradually warming) fat slicks, but it's obvious that the multi-link rear suspension offers so much more grip than a standard live axle can muster, and the high- revving engine allows a top speed of 170mph. Silverstone disappears below us at an astonishing rate of glorious speed.

    No wonder that, in 1972, the RS2600 won eight of the nine rounds of the European Championships, with Jochen Mass taking the European Drivers' title and Hans Stuck the German Championship. With a proper racing driver at the wheel, I now understand exactly how it was done.

    Above and below Pukka RS2600 flanked by 3.0-litre (on left) and Willie Green’s own 2.9-litre-engined Capri Injection; the man himself, in his element in tuition mode.

    THANKS TO owner Peter Whelan, RMA Trackdays, www. rmatrackdays. com; Peter Darley, historian; Willie Green, racer/instructor, tel: +UU (0)1773 550339, email: [email protected]

    Car #1972 #Ford-Capri-RS2600
    ENGINE 2995cc V6, OHV, alloy Weslake cylinder head, #Kugelfischer fuel injection
    POWER 319bhp @ 7000rpm
    TORQUE n/a
    TRANSMISSION Five-speed #ZF manual, rear-wheel drive, limited-slip differential
    STEERING Rack and pinion
    SUSPENSION
    Front: MacPherson struts, coil springs, telescopic dampers, anti-roll bar.
    Rear: live axle, semi-elliptic leaf springs, radius arms, anti-roll bar.
    BRAKES Discs
    WEIGHT 900kg
    PERFORMANCE Top speed 170mph. 0-60mph 4.6sec (depending on gearing)

    ‘WILLIE’S FOOT IS PLAYING THE THROTTLE PEDAL AS HE TRIES TO THROW ALL 319BHP AT THE GREASY TRACK’

    Above and left. Even a big, old, simple engine like Ford’s 3.0-litre Essex V6 can be coaxed into producing gobfuls of trackday power: witness 200bhp at fully 6500rpm, as here; livery makes it look purposeful outside while interior is, er, functional.

    Car #1978 #Ford-Capri-3000
    ENGINE 2994cc V6, 0HV, #Weber carburettor
    POWER 200bhp @ 6500rpm
    TORQUE 180ft lb @ 3800rpm
    TRANSMISSION Four-speed manual. rear-wheel drive, limited-slip differential
    STEERING Rack and pinion
    SUSPENSION
    Front: MacPherson struts, coilsprings, telescopic dampers, anti-roll bar.
    Rear: live axle, semi-elliptic leaf springs, telescopic dampers, radius rods.
    WEIGHT 1000kg
    PERFORMANCE Top speed 135mph. 0-60mph 6.5sec (est)

    ‘THIS IS A LESSON IN DANCING A CAR AROUND A WET CIRCUIT IN TOTAL CONTROL, ON THE EDGE BUT NEVER OVER IT’

    Car #1982 #Ford-Capri-Injection-2.9
    ENGINE 2935cc V6, DOHC, 24-valve, #Bosch fuel injection
    POWER 206bhp @ 5800rpm
    TORQUE 203lb ft @ 4500rpm
    TRANSMISSION Five-speed manual, rear-wheel drive, limited-slip differential
    STEERING Rack and pinion
    SUSPENSION
    Front: MacPherson struts, coilsprings, telescopic dampers, anti-roll bar.
    Rear: live axle, semi- elliptic leaf springs, telescopic dampers, radius rods.
    BRAKES Discs
    WEIGHT 1150kg
    PERFORMANCE Top speed 130mph. 0-60mph 7sec (est)
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  • Jeroen Booij created this group

    Ford Capri

    Ford Capri PRICE RANGE £3000-22,500

    Increasingly popular with a new generation of enthusiasts captivated by the Capri’s image and user-friendliness, there’s a good selection to be had. Yet despite that availability, prices are on the rise not only for the late 2.8 injection and earlier...
    Ford Capri PRICE RANGE £3000-22,500

    Increasingly popular with a new generation of enthusiasts captivated by the Capri’s image and user-friendliness, there’s a good selection to be had. Yet despite that availability, prices are on the rise not only for the late 2.8 injection and earlier 3.0-litre cars, but the four-pot models, too. In particular, the Series Two model in all forms is highly prized by aficionados. ACA sold two 1974 3.0-litre Ghias for £11,235 and £11,550, while Silverstone auctioned a beautifully-restored 1980 3.0S for a highly commendable £22,500 and a low-mileage 1978 3.0S for £23,625. Ample evidence that four cylinder models are on the up came again from ACA with a 1973 1600XL that was hammered away for £10,815. ‘The Car You Always Promised Yourself ’ was the advertising line, but if you want to fulfil that youthful promise for a reasonable price, then you’d better get a move on.
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