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  •   C Gooch reacted to this post about 1 year ago
    / #2019-Audi-R8-V10-Performance / #2019 / #Audi-R8-V10-Performance / #Audi-R8-V10-Performance-Type-4S / #2019-Audi-R8-V10-Performance-Type-4S / #Audi-R8-Type-4S / #Audi-R8 / #Audi

    It’s a superstar supercar on the road, but how does the R8 fare on track?

    Should a 611bhp mid-engined supercar make a good track car? Reading that back it sounds like a contender for the easiest question asked since ‘Is F1 more interested in the minutiae of the rules than the racing?’

    KY19 NLF has, to date, proved to be a mixed bag on track. Its time has, as I write, been restricted to the first evo track evening of the season at Bedford Autodrome, but the changeable conditions provided the perfect canvas for the R8 to paint me a detailed dynamic picture.

    The first half-dozen laps were on a wet track and it took two laps of the Autodrome’s 3.8-mile GT circuit before the first strokes of feedback appeared, allowing me to pick out more detail on what was going on beneath me. Which on a greasy track and a set of Michelin Pilot Sport 4 S tyres struggling to generate any heat, wasn’t a great deal.

    Entry to low-speed turns had the front end struggling to find any grip, the steering taking on a lightness that mimicked the City steering setting on a 1999 Fiat Punto. And yet the R8’s quattro drivetrain doesn’t struggle on the exit when you start to feed in the V10’s power – unless you’re reckless with the throttle, that is, then there’s plenty of shuffling and slipping to manage, although this isn’t too much of an issue because the R8 comes to you when it starts to get squirmy.
    Mid-speed corners in the same conditions eradicate a large portion of the front-end vagueness on entry, but the transition from grip to slip and back to grip mid-corner isn’t as clearly telegraphed as you would hope for in a car with a 5.2-litre V10 positioned between the bulkhead and rear bumper. It takes a steady throttle and Guinness-smooth steering inputs to avoid a spiky mess of slip when you’d much prefer to be parallel to the circuit’s edge.

    It all comes together in the high-speed stuff. Which is reassuring. When you need the utmost commitment from the R8’s front end, you get it, the Pilot Sports finding purchase through the layer of grease, the steering coming back to you, the chassis chatting away. When you need the full processing power of Audi Sport’s engineers, the R8 delivers terabytes of data to your palms and backside.

    As conditions dry, the R8’s low- and mid-speed performance up their game, but strangely on the drier surface, at higher speeds, within a handful of laps you feel you’ve experienced everything the R8 has to offer. It feels a little synthesised, a sensation that could be down to our car’s optional #Dynamic-Steering and adaptive dampers, two components that have proved themselves to be great companions on the road. This sounds like a perfect excuse for me to try a non-Performance R8 without such features on track, as per the example that triumphed in our 911 group test in issue 262. Away from the track, the R8’s ability to switch from a supercar that will force your eyeballs out of their sockets when you use as much of its performance as you dare, to a car that could rival a Continental GT for suppleness, refinement and comfort, is showing it to be more at home on the road.

    Date acquired April 2019
    Total mileage 4423
    Mileage this month 1075
    Costs this month £0
    mpg this month 18.7
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  • Stuart Gallagher unlocked the badge Bookworm
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  •   Elizabeth reacted to this post about 1 year ago
    BMW M4 CS / #BMW-4-Series / #BMW-4-Series-Coupe

    It’s been a bumpy ride – both literally and metaphorically – for the F82-generation M4, but in the CS is the M division finally giving us the car we all crave? Photography: Stephen Hall.

    EVO has had an on-off love affair with BMW’s M4. We admire its muscle-car looks, performance potential and rear-drive chassis. Being a product of M GmbH also infuses it with a desirability that rivals are still some way from achieving.

    Yet it’s been a struggle to wholly fall for the M4. Its turbocharged 3-litre straight-six has the punch to fire it down a road and around a track with a force Anthony Joshua would swerve. But this has also been its downfall. So thuggish has been the delivery to the rear tyres that not only do they give up the fight for traction earlier than you are expecting, but so too does the rear suspension, throwing in the towel at the first sign of any loading through its springs and dampers. It makes for an infuriating experience, because on its day, on the right road and in the right conditions – a bone-dry, smooth surface – the M4 is your best mate. But few of us live at the Ascari race resort, so it’s often a mate you leave the pub early to avoid.

    How, then, is BMW’s new M4 CS going to cope with a 29bhp increase to 454bhp and an additional 36lb ft, bringing the total to 442lb ft? The first part of the answer is the M4 Competition Package of 2016, which brought a lower ride height and stiffer springs, dampers and anti-roll bars. It greatly improved the base M4’s behaviour, even with a power increase to 444bhp. For MY18 cars, the Comp Pack itself has been improved (the upgrade has been upgraded, essentially), and it acts as a basis for the M4 CS we have here. M division chief Frank van Meel confirms there’s been not a single hardware change to the M4 CS’s chassis over that of the MY18 M4 Competition Package. Rather, he and his team have been busy with the laptops, reprogramming the M Adaptive suspension to better suit the now standard Michelin Cup 2 tyres. It’s the same situation with the electric power steering and the engine ECU, both of which have been optimised to sharpen the CS.
    There are a number of further detail changes to the CS. It’s only available with the seven-speed M DCT double-clutch gearbox, and in addition to the carbonfibre roof that’s already standard on the M4, the front splitter, rear diffuser and bonnet are also carbon, the bonnet being 25 per cent lighter than the regular aluminium panel. The new bonnet also features a sizable vent ahead of the powerdome.

    The 19in front and 20in rear wheels are lightweight items with 265/35 rubber at the front and 285/30 at the rear, the former being the focus for much of the damper tuning to improve steering precision. The only big mechanical change is the fitment of a more free-flowing exhaust, and due to the lack of any front speakers, there’s no sound imposer, meaning you hear an M engine playing its natural tune rather a digitally enhanced one. Other changes inside include lightweight door-cards from the GTS, a pair of manually adjustable lightweight sports seats and a steering wheel and centre-console trimmed in Alcantara.

    All in all, there’s a 35kg weight saving, down to 1505kg compared to 1540kg for an M4 with an M DCT gearbox. The CS cracks 62mph in a claimed 3.9sec (two-tenths quicker than the DCT standard M4) and runs on to 174mph. And, of course, there’s a Ring lap time of 7min 38sec.

    These numbers pale into the insignificant when it comes to the road, though, because whatever van Meel and his team have done to the underbelly of the CS, it has transformed the M4 from an unpredictable and ultimately frustrating performance car into one with all the character, ability and entertainment of M-cars of old. It’s how the CS reacts to your steering inputs that hits you first.

    Where previous M4s have an uncomfortable dead spot and take a moment for the front tyres to react, the CS’s nose is rich in clarity, speed and precision, delivering instant confidence. The gripper Cup 2 tyres are an obvious factor in this, but the steering and setup changes allow you to commit harder because there’s a clearer sense of how the chassis is working beneath you.

    Hooked into a corner, the CS feels much more stable and better balanced, the chassis allowing you to position it so much more accurately at the apex, get on the power earlier and work on your exit speed. With previous M4s this was always a bit of a hit-and-miss affair. Too generous with your right foot and either the traction control went into hyperdrive or, if it was switched off, the rear tyres would vaporise. The car was as frustrating on the road as it was impressive for the cameras on track. That it also acted up when trying to put the power down in a straight line didn’t help it win friends, either.

    In the CS there’s none of this. You can play the hooligan if you wish, but it’s so much more rewarding and satisfying to be able to open the throttle early in the corner and drive through the exit feeling the M-diff hook up and the chassis working the load with newfound precision.

    Downsides? The #DCT gearbox now feels old in comparison to rivals and the brakes come up short, too. The standard cast-iron discs, with four-piston calipers at the front, two at the rear, are not a match for the car’s performance – it takes only a few committed stops for the pedal travel to lengthen, and while retardation doesn’t decline, the precision does. The optional carbon-ceramics help. There’s another issue. The £89,130 price tag is a £25k premium over a Competition Package, which makes it extremely hard to recommend the CS on price alone, despite it currently being the ultimate M4.

    Below right: carbonceramic discs denoted by gold calipers – they’re expensive and not that easy to modulate, but are an improvement on the standard, cast-iron pieces; engine not quite in full firebreathing 493bhp GTS spec, but it is mightily potent even so.

    ‘The M4 CS has all the character and ability of M-cars of old’

    TECHNICAL DATA FILE / SPECIFICATION #2017 / #BMW-M4-CS-F82 / #BMW-4-Series-F82 / #BMW-F82 / #BMW / 2017 / #BMW-M4 / #BMW-M4-F82 / #2017-BMW-M4-CS-F82

    Engine In-line 6-cyl, 2979cc, twin-turbo
    Power 454bhp @ 6250rpm DIN
    Torque 442lb ft @ 4000-5380rpm DIN
    0-62mph 3.9sec (claimed)
    Top speed 174mph (limited)
    Weight 1505kg (307bhp/ton)
    Basic price £89,130
    Rating 4+

    + The M4 you can finally exploit and enjoy, no matter what the road or conditions

    - At a price that could buy you a 911 Carrera S
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  •   Jack Grover reacted to this post about 1 year ago
    Track beckons for new Continental GT / #2018 / #Bentley-Continental-GT / #2018-Bentley-Continental-GT / #Bentley / #Bentley-Continental-GT3

    Sub-1300kg, 550bhp, #V8-powered racer revealed hot on the heels of new Bentley road car
    Bentley is taking the Continental GT to the track in #2018

    It took Bentley a decade to get its original Continental GT out of the paddock and onto the track, but a GT3 racing version of the new Conti GT will line up on the grid at Monza in 2018 within a couple of months of the first road cars being delivered. And it has a lot to live up to. The original Continental GT3 race car racked up 528 races, 120 podiums and 45 wins during its short, four-year life. And with GT3 racing becoming evermore competitive, the new Bentley contender can’t afford the smallest confidence lift on its way into the first corner.

    To create their second-generation GT3 racer, Bentley’s motorsport engineers and Malcolm Wilson’s M-Sport – the race team charged with running the cars – started out with the new Conti GT road car. Job one was to shed over 850kg to give a sub-1300kg race-ready weight.

    Ditching the hand-finished interior accounted for most of that mass, but the use of carbonfibre for the non-structural body panels and other body parts (front splitter, rear wing, arch extensions) also contributed to shedding the pounds, as did the loss of the front driveshafts – the racer is rear-wheel drive. Hours in the wind tunnel have dictated its aggressive aero package, which hangs from the road car’s new Porsche Panamera-derived aluminium structure.

    Rather than the road car’s W12 , the racer will feature a development of the 4-litre twin-turbo V8 that served the team so well over the last four seasons. Updates for 2018 include a redesigned dry sump and new inlet and exhaust systems. Bentley claims its unrestricted output is ‘in excess of 550bhp’.

    Drive is delivered via a six-speed sequential gearbox, a carbon propshaft and a limited-slip differential. The suspension is all-new and so, too, are the six- and four-piston (front/rear) #Alcon brake calipers and iron discs.

    For 2018 a pair of Continental GT3s will race in the #Blancpain-GT-Series-Endurance-Cup as well as the four-round Intercontinental GT Challenge. With the driver line-up yet to be confirmed, evo is prepared to throw its Arai into the mix. It’s the least we can do while we wait for the GT3-inspired Continental Supersports road car to arrive.
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  •   Russ Smith reacted to this post about 2 years ago
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  •   Daniel 1982 reacted to this post about 2 years ago
    BMW M5
    Engines like the one shoehorned into the M5 need to be savoured while they are still around – even if your neighbours don’t think it’s all that cool…

    Date acquired March 2018
    Total mileage 12,418
    Mileage this month 3246
    Costs this month £0
    mpg this month 23.9

    / #2018-BMW-M5-F90 / #BMW-M5-F90 / #BMW-M5 / #BMW / #2018 / #BMW-F90 / #BMW-5-Series / #BMW-5-Series-M5 / #BMW-5-Series-M5-F90 / #BMW-5-Series-F90 /

    It’s to be expected that the 4.4-litre, twin-turbo #V8 lurking behind the M5’s kidney grille is going to generate levels of heat normally associated with my living room when someone ignites the fire and forgets to turn the central heating down. What I didn’t expect was how much cooling it requires post engine shutdown, no matter what the length of journey. Nor how much noise is generated in the process.

    In the early hours, after a late-night run back from evo HQ , the M5 can get a bit of a pant on and doesn’t hold back on the decibels (around 88), and it can be a good five to seven minutes before it’s sufficiently cooled. Only Mercedes’ new AMG G63 has annoyed the neighbours with more of the same and for longer.

    Lift the M5’s aluminium bonnet and it’s clear why those eight cylinders can get a little hot under the collar. Most modern engines look larger than a Spitfire’s Merlin when dressed with the de facto moulded plastic cover, but remove the M-branded hat from the S63 motor and there’s barely a millimetre to spare. As a piece of packaging it’s quiet remarkable, although I can’t imagine the independent specialists who will be working on it in a decade’s time thinking the same.

    Despite its antics after every run the F90’s V8, like those found in AMG’s hotrods, is a mighty piece of engineering to control. It doesn’t have the theatrics of the Affalterbach power units in terms of vocal support every time the crank rotates, but its performance is on a par and it’s every bit as exciting when you let it off the leash. Yet despite being based on the motor fitted to its F10 predecessor, the considerable changes #BMW-M has made have turned a potent yet anodyne engine into a characterful and deeply layered V8. And while its downsized and electrified replacement will blow our minds in terms of technology, I’m worried it won’t tug at our heartstrings like this one does. Truth be told, I already know it won’t.

    Which means we should enjoy cars such as the M5 while we can. One day we’ll need to dig deep on these memories of driving a car with supercar performance, sports car agility and family practicality as we’re transported everywhere in an electric pod.
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  • Stuart Gallagher created a new group

    Ferrari 812 Superfast

    Ferrari 812 Superfast 2018-2020

    Specifications
    Engine

    Engine compartment
    The car has an enlarged 6,496 cc (6.5 L; 396.4 cu in) version of the F140 V12 compared to the 6.3-litre engine used in the F12 berlinetta. The engine produces 800 PS (789 bhp; 588 kW) at 8,500 rpm and 718 N⋅m (530...
    Ferrari 812 Superfast 2018-2020

    Specifications
    Engine

    Engine compartment
    The car has an enlarged 6,496 cc (6.5 L; 396.4 cu in) version of the F140 V12 compared to the 6.3-litre engine used in the F12 berlinetta. The engine produces 800 PS (789 bhp; 588 kW) at 8,500 rpm and 718 N⋅m (530 lb⋅ft) of torque at 7,000 rpm.

    The 812 Superfast's engine is, as of 2018, the most powerful naturally aspirated production car engine ever made.

    Despite having possessed powertrain technology expertise in overcharging (turbocharging) and hybrid disciplines, Ferrari has made clear that none of those technologies are being incorporated in the legendary FR (front-engine, rear wheel-drive), V12-engined berlinetta design -- at present and in future -- due to heritage reasons.

    Transmission
    The transmission for the 812 Superfast is a dual-clutch 7-speed F1 automated manual gearbox manufactured for Ferrari by Getrag, based on the gearbox used in the Ferrari 458.

    Wheels
    The 812 Superfast has 20-inch wheels at the front and the rear. The tyres are Pirelli P Zero with codes of 275/35 ZR 20 for the front tires and 315/35 ZR 20 for the rear. The brakes are carbon-ceramic Brembo Extreme Design disc brakes, which Ferrari claims have 5.8% improved braking performance from 100 km/h to 0 km/h as compared to the F12berlinetta. The front brakes have a diameter of 398 mm (15.7 in) and the rear brakes have a diameter of 360 mm (14 in).

    Aerodynamics
    Ferrari has stated that the FR (front-engine, rear wheel-drive) V12 vehicle platform -- part of the brand's heritage -- is not easy to refine and has presented various developmental challenges. As such, a combination of complicated aerodynamics technology is used to complement the 812 Superfast's chassis control system. It includes a mix of active and passive aerodynamics to improve drag coefficient values over the F12 berlinetta. The front of the car is designed to increase downforce and includes intakes for front brake cooling, as well as ducts to increase underbody air flow. The bonnet of the car also features channels to move air through to the side of the car for additional downforce. The rear diffuser of the 812 Superfast has active flaps that can open up at high speeds to further reduce drag.

    Performance
    Ferrari claims that the 812 Superfast has a top speed of 211 mph (340 km/h) with a 0–62 mph (0–100 km/h) acceleration time of 2.9 seconds.

    The car has a power to weight ratio of 2.04 kg (4.50 lb) per horsepower(ps). This has been declared by Ferrari the 'perfect power to weight ratio'. The 812 Superfast is the first Ferrari equipped with EPS (Electronic Power Steering). It also shares the rear-wheel-steering system (Virtual Short Wheelbase 2.0) borrowed from the limited edition F12tdf. The weight distribution of the car is 47% front, 53% rear.

    Design

    Rear 3/4 view showing quad tail lights and body-colored diffuser
    The design is inspired by the F12berlinetta, though it gets some updated styling cues like full LED headlamps, air vents on the bonnet, quad circular tail lights, and a body-colored rear diffuser. The two-box, high tail design of the car is intended to resemble that of the 365 GTB/4 Daytona, a Pininfarina design, though the car was designed at the Ferrari Styling Center.[12]The interior of the 812 Superfast takes inspiration from both the preceding F12berlinetta and the interior of the Ferrari LaFerrari, especially the shape and position of the air vents and the contours of the dashboard.

    As part of the Ferrari's flagship model design, the 812 Superfast's center control stack continues to lack a central infotainment display featured in such models as GTC4Lusso and Portofino, retaining only a small temperature display for the climate control system and splitting all vehicular status information displays among the driver's multifunction instrument cluster, as well as the passenger-side touchscreen stack display above the glove compartment area.

    As with certain previous models, the 812 Superfast can be ordered with specially designed, model name-tagged, multi-piece luggage set which fit into the vehicle's rear trunk effectively.

    Initial market deployment and roadshow

    The 812 Superfast debuted as an MY2018 model. As of 2018, the vehicle costs $358,102 in the US before options but actual delivery dates in that region are still unknown.

    Shortly after the vehicle's initial unveil in early 2017, preproduction units have been sent to various parts of the world for private preview and promotion. In Asia, the 812 Superfast was unveiled in Japan as early as late May 2017 and carries a post-tax sticker price of ¥39,100,000. Deliveries were said to be scheduled later that year.

    In Singapore the 812 Superfast was launched at around June (early July) 2017 with a sticker price of SG$1.42M.

    In Hong Kong, the 812 Superfast was unveiled in late November 2017, making it the first new model presented under the city's new dealership, Blackbird Concessionaires (a division of Blackbird Automotive as of June 2017), in conjunction with Ferrari Hong Kong, a new, fully owned Ferrari subsidiary responsible for vehicle importation into the city. Both entitles took over from the previous dealership after complicated transitions throughout the first half of 2017, which partly contributed to delay in the new vehicle introduction in town.

    The preproduction 812 Superfast used for the Hong Kong presentation, in "Rosso Settantanni" body color, was scheduled to leave town on December 10th but was delayed until the 20th, due to the need to participate in various local automotive magazines' year-end "Car of the Year" awards events. The vehicle is understood to have nabbed a few "Best of the Pick" accolades for the year 2017.

    In October of 2018, noted Instagram celebrity Dan Bilzerian was seen driving one on his Instagram story.

    As of December 2017 the 812 Superfast has a post-tax sticker price of HK$5.4M before options, and was scheduled to be delivered at around January 2018.

    Ferrari Monza SP

    Monza SP2 at Paris Motor Show 2018

    At a private event held for customers and investors at the company's headquarters in Maranello, Italy in September 2018, Ferrari unvieled the first two models in its new Icona series of models. The cars called the Monza SP1 and SP2 (1 and 2 denoting the seating capacity) pay homage to the iconic open top race cars of the 1950s. The cars are designed with inspiration taken from Ferrari's historic race cars such as the 750 Monza and are developed to provide a dedicated open top driving experience. The car is based on the 812 Superfast and utilises its chassis, engine, transmission and interior components but the engine has been tuned to generate a maximum power output of 810 PS (596 kW; 799 hp).

    The Monza can accelerate from 0–100 km/h (0–62 mph) in 2.9 seconds, 0–200 km/h (0–124 mph) in 7.9 seconds and can attain a maximum speed of 299 km/h (186 mph). The car uses a carbon fibre construction and features bespoke wheels, interior colour choices, small scissor doors and a full LED strip serving as the tail light of the car. The virtual windshield (present ahead of the driver only and a concept used previously in the Mercedes SLR McLaren Stirling Moss) disrupts airflow over the driver in order to maintain maximum driving comfort. Due to the use of lightweight materials, the Monza SP weighs 1,500 kg (3,306.9 lb) while the SP1 weighs a further 20 kg (44.1 lb) less due to the deletion of passenger seat.

    Production of the Monza SP will be limited to 500 units with all of the units already pre-sold to selected customers and with pricing set to be unvieled at the Paris Motor Show. The cars will be delivered with a special racing suit and a helmet tailored for each customer. The new Icona series will sit above the Ferrari's flagship V8 models.
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  •   Andrew English reacted to this post about 2 years ago
    ASTON MARTIN DB4 GT CONTINUATION

    The original #Aston-Martin-DB4-GT was built between #1959 and #1963 / with eight of the original 75 in special lightweight form. Aston Martin has now announced it will build a further 25 lightweight cars, to original specification, each with 340bhp from their twin-spark straight-six engines. Production will commence in late 2017. It’s clearly the latest fashion: Jaguar, Lister and Shelby have all created continuation cars in recent years. McLaren F1 continuation model, anyone? #Aston-Martin-DB4 / #Aston-Martin / #Aston-Martin-DB4-GT-Lightweight /
    • No spurious 'lost' chassis numbers or factory fire mythology then. Just a pure profit motive. Ferrari must be looking at the auction prices of theirNo spurious 'lost' chassis numbers or factory fire mythology then. Just a pure profit motive. Ferrari must be looking at the auction prices of their back catalogue and considering the same thing. 250 'continuation' 250 GTOs anyone? And sod the authenticity.  More ...
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