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    A new era on the horizon: after eight years of 996 production, Porsche used this picture to herald the introduction of the #Porsche-911-997 generation, marking a return to more traditional 911 styling with rounded headlights and separate turn signals housed within the front PU. The first ‘modern’ 911 with switchable throttle maps and damping now celebrates its 15th birthday.

    Tenerife, Canary Islands / #Porsche-911 / #Porsche / #Porsche-997
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    CAR: Bristol, UK
    Model #1999-Porsche-911-Carrera-4-996.1 / #1999 / #Porsche-911-Carrera-4-996.1 / #Porsche-911-996.1 / #Porsche-911-Carrera-4-996 / #Porsche-911-996 / #Porsche-911 / #Porsche

    Year #1999

    Acquired FEBRUARY 2014

    My time with this 911 is drawing to a close, so this will be my last Living the Legend article. I have owned my car for five-and-a- half years, put over 30,000 miles on it and had a great time, but for now this chapter will be closing as I will be selling the car and looking for a replacement.

    During my years of ownership there have been plenty of highs and lows, but luckily many more highs! Picking up a car is always exciting, and picking up my 911 was no exception. I won’t lie though, in the first few weeks of ownership the car spent more time back at the independent dealer than with me. I did go through the ‘what have I done’ phase, but all issues were resolved and I took the opportunity to get the IMS replaced while the engine was out, so after that point things started looking up. Soon after buying the car and a few email exchanges later my first column for Total 911 was submitted, starting a long relationship with the magazine and introducing me to a great group of people.

    Something I had never experienced before with a car was the whole lifestyle experience. As with all the guys at Total 911, joining both Porsche GB and TIPEC resulted in a new group of friends with a shared passion, events to go to and drives to enjoy. This is probably the most significant takeaway for my five years of ownership – great friends and memories. Special thanks to Lee Sibley, firstly, for letting me write for the magazine, but more importantly introducing me to the B4391 – probably one of the best roads I have driven. There are plenty more good roads out there, but I think this sticks in my mind as that weekend was one of my first road trips where it was all about the cars.

    My 996 has had a lot of work over the years. Three events stick out: the first was when a Porsche health check flagged that my rear boxes needed replacing – an opportunity for a stainless system. The mild sport unit from Top Gear was ordered, a fraction of the cost of the main dealer, but it sounded so much better. The second key event was arriving to work in a cloud of steam when my water pump failed. Recovery was required, but after a pump, thermostat, new header tank and a boroscope the car was back in full health.

    My final high was getting the car’s geometry sorted. The guys at Center Gravity did a fantastic job. The end result is a car that drives better, corners far more confidently and seems to cover ground with ease. The next step is to sell the car and start the search for a replacement. Porsche do feature on my list, so I may see you again in the pages of Total 911 in the future.
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    992 wins another Car of the Year accolade

    Eighth-generation 911 takes Sunday Times honour

    The 992 Carrera S has scooped another prize by taking the Motor Awards Car of the Year accolade at a ceremony in London. The Motor Awards is put together by media entities The Sunday Times, The Times, The Sun and talkSPORT radio, with readers and listeners drawing a shortlist for a panel of experts to choose from.

    Settling on the 450hp C2S Coupe, the panel of experts concluded: “For anyone seeking an extraordinary breadth of ability in one car, the Carrera S is hard to beat.” It is the second time the 992-generation 911 has scooped an accolade from the British press, after claiming the Auto Express Performance Car of the Year in July.

    / #2019-Porsche-911-992 / #2019-Porsche-911-Carrera-S-992 / #2019 / #2020-Porsche-911-Carrera-S-992 / #Porsche-911-Carrera-4S-992 / #Porsche-911-Carrera-S / #Porsche-911-992 / #Porsche-911 / #Porsche-992 / #Porsche
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    992 GTS spied in testing

    Drive-My 992 911’s Club spies have also captured the 992 GTS in testing. Resplendent without camouflage, suggesting a release in the coming months, the Coupe example in our pictures is fitted with centre-locking wheels – a key aspect of GTS design – plus a Sport Design rear PU. Clear rear lights are visible instead of the usual red.

    / #Porsche-911-992 / #Porsche-992 / #Porsche / #Porsche-911 / #2021-Porsche-911GTS-992 / #Porsche-911-GTS-992 / #Porsche-911GTS-992 / #Porsche-911GTS
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    It was back down to supercar tuning house #Litchfield-Motors for me this month; it needed some professional photography of a brand-new, Guards red #Porsche-911-Carrera-4S-992 that it had been testing for the last few weeks on its dyno. The guys at Litchfield were confident they could make some impressive power gains out of the new 3.0-litre, twin-turbocharged flat six engine following successful tweaks to the previous 991.2 3.0 engine. The turbocharged units in today’s modern era of #911 s are making Porsche more tunable than ever, and when it comes to tuning turbocharged cars, Litchfield certainly knows what it’s doing with its state-of the- art MAHA dyno cell. After just a few runs the team were able to safely increase the power from the respectable standard figure of 450ps to a whopping 580ps at the flywheel – I should point out that this is with just a remap tune and no additional modifications! There’s a plan to add more modifications soon, including an Akrapovic exhaust. Iain Litchfield talked about how it would seem the engines in the 992s are heavily detuned, with lots of exciting potential, and another interesting point is that it would appear that the standard 992 Carrera uses largely the same engine as the ’S’ models but detuned further still, meaning a standard 992 Carrera could potentially be tuned to similar figures that they have achieved with the 4S. I’m personally excited to see the results once they’ve got their hands on a base Carrera.

    / #Porsche-911-Carrera-4S-Litchfield-Motors-992 / #Porsche-911-Carrera-992 / #Porsche-911-992 / #Porsche-992 / #Porsche / #Porsche-911
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    Werk II, Zuffenhausen, Stuttgart Porsche / #Porsche-911 / #Porsche-911-993 / #Porsche-911-Carrera-2 / #Porsche-911-Carrera-2-993

    An 86-year-old #Ferry-Porsche , who was responsible for the first-ever #Porsche car sold by the company in 1948, stands alongside the millionth example nearly 50 years later. The car in question, a 993 Carrera 2 with VarioRam, was given to the German highway patrol, where it served for ten years before being handed back to Porsche. Today it can be found on display in the Museum, just the other side of Porscheplatz from where it first rolled out into the Stuttgart sunlight.
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    Behind The Scenes On Our 1969 #Porsche 911 T Film

    / #1969-Porsche-911T / #1969 / #Porsche-911T / #Porsche-911

    Each week, with every one of our films, our goal is to bring you not only the cars you love, but the kinds of stories that speak to our shared interests from an individual’s perspective. This week we join an old favorite in the form of this 1969 911 T as we follow Kurht Gerhardt through his favorite driving spots during Los Angeles’ early hours.

    After a stint owning some classic Italian steel, Kurht decided that he wanted to hang onto the romance of the vintage experience, but in a package that was altogether more reliable and decidedly easier to find parts and service options for. “I wanted something that was efficient, and that ran right, and that I could get into and just drive.”


    An early 901 Porsche fit the criteria, and so he bought two. It might sound strange to label this one-to-two car swap as an instance of reduction, but looking past the size of the garage space required that’s just what’s happened here. The 911, and the T, or Touring, model especially so, is a very simple car. It’s not fitted with extra functionality or many amenities to dilute the driving feel and feedback provided in such a lightweight and focused sports car. This holds true for all early 901 chassis, but it’s the T that’s the most stripped-down model in the range, and arguably the most pleasurable experience because of it.


    It’s every bit as quick as he needs it to be, and outside of an R, the T can be considered the Porsche that’s been reduced to the maximum degree — not in the sense of loss in the negative though, but rather that its simplicity adds to the driving characteristics and overall temperament by way of not getting in the way; the T channels a level of purity, of unrefined Porsche personality.

    So what does Kurht do to take advantage of this? “One of my favorite things to do is to get up at like six, seven o’clock in the morning on a Sunday.” Living in LA, these early morning weekend hours are the most opportune time to have the weave of the city streets all to yourself, and as you can see in the film, Kurht makes good use of the space available in the first hours of light. It’s a time when the city is still quiet, and the urban and mountain roads alike can offer their true potential to the drivers who seek it.

    He also plans to participate in the Peking to Paris race in 2019, taking the dizzying 8,500-mile route as an opportunity to live out a dream of his. “I can’t wait to get out in the Porsche and camp and just rough it,” he says, “being out in the middle of nowhere for six weeks, it’s going to be an amazing adventure.”

    In the meantime though, he will continue driving the snot out of this sweet piece of Porsche history, and it’s a plan he has stretched out into the furthest future too; “It’s something I want to keep for life because it’s such a solid car. No matter what, it just keeps on running, and you can beat it up a bit and you can haul ass and it still does great. It starts up every day.”

    This is how you use a classic car and wring the most out of it, this is how you Drive Tastefully.
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    992’S TICKET TO ENTRY

    PORSCHE reveals base #Porsche-911-Carrera-992 / #Porsche-911-992 / #Porsche-911-Carrera / #Porsche-992 / #Porsche-911 / #Porsche / #Porsche-992 / #2020-Porsche-911-Carrera-992 / #2020

    It’s very fast

    While the eighth generation Porsche 911 Carrera S has been public knowledge for some time, details on the base Carrera and Cabriolet remained guarded secrets... until now.

    Porsche has finally revealed how much its base 911s will cost, how fast they’ll go and what they look like, gifting the sportscar world a new benchmark to measure itself against. The 911 Carrera Coupe starts from $229,500 in Australia, with the Cabriolet costing an extra chunk for $251,000. Or a $3050 and $3500 increase, respectively, on the previous generation’s PDK-equipped base models.

    For that, customers get plenty as standard, including lane change assist, 14-way heated seats, a BOSE sound system, and metallic paint. Mechanically it is very similar to both its predecessor and the more powerful Carrera S that’s already been revealed, powered by a 3.0-litre twin-turbo flat-six producing 283kW and 450Nm.

    That’s 48kW/80Nm less than the Carrera S but 11kW more than the previous base Carrera. Acceleration from 0-100km/h is claimed to take 4.2sec for the Coupe, or 4.0sec when optioned with Sport Chrono, while top speed is 293km/h.

    Braking is provided by 330mm discs and four-piston calipers at both ends, while the wheels are an inch smaller than on the S, measuring 19s on the front and 20s at the rear wrapped in 235/40 and 295/35 tyres respectively. An eight-speed dual-clutch is currently the only available transmission, but we’d expect a seven-speed manual to appear at a later date.

    Like its more powerful sibling, the 992 Carrera uses the widebody shell which allows for expanded tracks and a larger footprint on the road. Despite its extra size an increase in the amount of aluminium and high-strength steel makes the body lighter than its predecessor, though weight has crept up to 1505kg when empty.

    The biggest alterations have taken place inside, where the base Carrera apes the S by adopting a brand new interior design with substantially upgraded connectivity, a 10.9-inch touchscreen display and a pair of digital displays that flank the iconic central analogue tachometer.

    The new 911 Carrera is available to order locally now, with deliveries expected to commence in Q4 this year.

    BELOW Drop-top takes two tenths longer in the (0-62mph) 0-100km/h stakes
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    For many buyers, asset performance is now more important than driving performance

    Just looking #Porsche-911 / #Porsche

    This year has seen one of the hottest trading runs ever for pre-owned Porsches. This has been fuelled by strong sales of cars under ten years old, combined with a long overdue market correction for the classics that continues to bring values towards the levels of Ferrari and the other Italian exotica. The buoyant market has resulted in me driving a remarkable selection of Porsches over the past six months. I can't complain my job doesn’t have its benefits! The most active and exciting sector has been the classic Porsches – everything from the very first 911s and 912s through 944 Turbos and S2s to the blue chip 993 Turbo. Sadly though, as I flick through my road test impressions on these cars, I'm left with a feeling that for many buyers asset performance is now more important than driving performance.
    The first Porsche that really brought this home was a 964 Turbo 3.6. The seller claimed the car was the best thing since sliced bread and priced it accordingly. The 964 Turbo is the best of the single turbo 911 Turbos, but at 1470kg it is a heavy car. That weight combined with the fierce power delivery adds up to a point-and-squirt machine – some way from the being the all-round performer that is the hallmark of a good 911.

    That accolade would take some justifying on the 996 GT2 also. A few weeks back I was checking boost levels one fresh morning along a straight country road and I didn't spot some overhanging trees ahead, shading the asphalt. This beast doesn't have traction control and it duly served up a tank slapper as the tyres found what was left of the morning dew. I caught it, but the experience underlines why this car is not for the inexperienced.

    964 RS values have gone into orbit and everybody is complaining they should have bought one years ago when they were £25,000. As a driver's car, the 964 RS is a cracker and deserves its value upswing. It’s the driver's benchmark for any late, air-cooled 911, being more edgy than the 993 version – another ingredient I love in a good 911. The great thing is that a standard 964 Carrera can provide some of the same thrills and experience for a fraction of the cost and, if you want to, it’s easily upgraded to RS spec. I drove a 964 C that had been modified as such and it was a peach in terms of delivering pure driving fun for a fraction of RS prices. While the top spec Porsches have always grabbed the headlines, we tend to forget that the entry level 911s have always offered the ability to put a smile on their driver’s faces. That applies to the 993 as much as a 964. Two ’94 Carreras demonstrated the truth of the old adage that there’s always a 911 better than the one you can afford, but that doesn't mean the more affordable cars are any less fun.

    Another stand out was a very enjoyable run in a great 944 S2. I've always been a 944 Turbo fan and these two water pumpers may arguably lay claim to being the best built cars Porsche ever made. What the cars have in spades is fantastic cornering balance and a strong family of engines. Pointedly, somebody commented recently that perhaps 944 drivers are the only classic Porsche drivers who really enjoy driving their cars today (as many classic 911s are hooked up to cash generators and tucked away in cocoons). Is that controversial or what?

    I've logged a long and enjoyable list of Boxsters, Caymans, 996s and 997s this year, but two specials were notable – a Cayman R, which delivered the same character as the old 968 Club Sport and surprisingly, has been somewhat neglected by the modern classic seekers because it still has a way to go on the depreciation curve. The other was a 2012 997 GTS, which using the 968 comparison, could be described as a 968 Sport with all the toys. The Powerkit’s extra 23hp over the DFI-engined 997 Carrera S gives the car more flexibility to snap overtake, but you can’t escape the firm ride.

    But call me biased (as I have one), my overall benchmark for any 911 remains the 1972-’73 2.4 911S. In the past weeks I’ve driven three really brilliant 2.4s, the two Ss included an astonishing original and a French restored ‘made as new’ restoration. The third T was a mature restoration from the 1990s. What marked these cars out as undiluted driving machines was their combination of lightness, peaky power (for the S) and handling edginess that demands your full attention. They are also cars that take time and practice to drive well. Next to the S, the T isn’t intimidating at all and showed that as with the basic 964 and 993s, the Cinderella models really earn their Porsche badge.

    Today, we often launch straight into values when talking about collectible Porsches, but we shouldn't forget that the best driver’s cars aren't necessarily the most expensive.
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