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    Last issue I mentioned how, after a mere three corners of my track day at Castle Combe, my #Porsche-911-C4S-996 suffered epic brake fail, forcing the car into an early finish. I didn’t hang around in getting the problem fixed, remembering my old man’s oft-recited saying that “the most important aspect of a car is its ability to stop”. Long-time readers will recall I changed the brakes on my previous 996.2 C4 to EBC a couple of years back, so the decision to turn to them once again was an easy one, promptly ordering Yellowstuff pads, Dot 4 fluid and braided lines. I then booked the car in at ZRS Engineering down the road in Poole, as Matt there now does all work on my beloved C4S.

    With the car on Matt’s two-post ramp, the wheels were whipped off and the pads removed. They had plenty of meat on them still as they were only installed at the end of 2017 but, as I’ve previously mentioned, I’ve just not been happy with their (complete lack of) feel and performance, despite fluid changes to alleviate the issue. Incidentally the pads had ‘TRW’ on the covers, which Matt informs me is the OEM brand, but whether or not it was just those covers which in this case were TRW remains to be seen. Either way, I took great pleasure in frisbeeing them into the bin.

    EBC’s Yellowstuff pads were then installed inside the C4S’s Big Red calipers: these are intended for fast road and occasional track use, as they offer performance in huge heat ranges without brake fade. Although fashion isn’t exactly a priority when it comes to safety, it was great to see the yellow hue of the pads adding to the visual flare of my yellow KW coilover springs, at least with the wheels off!

    Matt then replaced my rubber factory brake lines with EBC braided items. These will provide additional feel through the pedal, sorely needed in my case, and their braided element offers an increase in longevity underneath my C4S. With identical routing as per the factory lines, their it was simple enough. They’re good value: although the fittings don’t appear to be stainless steel (as they’re painted), they’re still good value when compared to vastly more expensive competitor items. I was pleased to have them fitted.

    Matt did have to make up new hard lines from each caliper as mine had corroded. A 996 will always throw up a curve ball on a job like this, particularly with rust or corrosion on chassis componentry, so the added time needed for Matt to make those up before connecting to the EBC lines was expected, really.

    With the braided lines in place Matt flushed out the old brake fluid, which ran for the hills when temperatures began to rise during the first few minutes of my aforementioned track day. I got two one-litre bottles of EBC ’s Dot 4 fluid, but the reality was we only needed the one. With the system bled, the wheels were soon back on and the 911 once again graced the floor.

    Next step was bedding the brakes in, which I’m still in the process of doing. This is crucial to ensuring the brakes perform well over a sustained period of time. Many people skip this step and then wonder why they get brake fade pretty quickly. The process for EBC’s brakes can be found on their website at ebcbrakeshop.co.uk, but essentially I have to cover 200 urban miles before conducting a series of high-speed stoppages down to 20mph.

    As I say I’m still in that process, and as soon as that’s done I’m heading for the track. What I will say, however, is that even now, after only a few miles, the difference is commendable. There’s now so much feel through that middle pedal that I can push it with confidence, those pads now clamping to the as-new discs with a conviction sorely lacking before. Once this set-up is run in, this is going to be an unbelievable car.

    Living the Legend – 911 owner reports Our contributing enthusiasts from around the world share their real-life experiences with their Porsche 911s

    Lee Sibley Bournemouth, UK

    Model #Porsche-911-Carrera-4S-996 / #Porsche-911-Carrera-996 / #Porsche-911-Carrera-4S / #Porsche-911-Carrera / #Porsche-911-996 / #Porsche-911 / #Porsche-996 / #2002-Porsche-911-Carrera-4S-996 / #Porsche /
    Year #2002

    Acquired April 2017 @lee_sibs
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    Porsche 911 Carrera (993)

    A half-cage has gone in and the back seats are out in a bid to make the Porsche more hardcore

    / #Porsche-911-Carrera-993 / #Porsche-911-993 / #Porsche-911 / #Porsche-911-Carrera / #Porsche-993 / #Porsche /

    The toolkit has been out recently, and likewise the 993’s back seats. More on this in a moment, but first you need to hear my justification. When you are surrounded by performance cars day-in, day-out, as I am fortunate enough to be in my job as evo’s staff photographer, you can’t help but feel drawn towards certain models, and also to analyse exactly what it is about them that appeals so much. Over the years there have been a handful of cars that have had me feeling a deep urge to sell my kidneys to own them. The first was the incredible 997-generation Porsche 911 GT3 RS 4.0, then later the Cayman GT4, Mégane R26.R, 458 Speciale, Golf Clubsport S and Ruf SCR 4.2. As you can see, there’s a theme here of mostly pared-back, driver-focused cars. This is clearly my ‘go to’ spec.

    So, unsurprisingly, I had an urge to make my 993 a little more hardcore and, yes, driver-focused. I figured the perfect way to achieve this would be to install a bolt-in half-cage, as this would increase the car’s body rigidity and also allow me to fit harnesses at some point.

    I chose a cage produced by German company Heigo, specifically its Clubsport model, and over a weekend staff writer Will Beaumont and I, with some extra help from Will’s father, removed the Porsche’s rear seats and assembled and installed the cage. Heigo has cleverly designed its half-cage so that you don’t need to destroy your carpet or weld in fixing plates for it. Instead it picks up on the original strengthened areas, including the front and rear seat belt fixings. Another positive is that we managed to fit it without having to remove the front seats. And although the kit weighs 25kg, after removing the rear seat belts and seat backs, the final extra weight to the car is a relatively minor 21kg.

    As well as the cage, I’ve also installed a front strut brace, similar to the one used in 993 RSR race cars and even the aforementioned Ruf SCR. When researching parts I was surprised to find that you can purchase this brace on its own via Ruf UK. It’s ultra-high quality and easy to install, and the benefits are reduced strut tower flex (as both towers are tied together) along with reduced chassis flex.

    The 993 is starting to become my ultimate fast road package and I can’t wait to get it back out on the road and track this summer to test the new set-up.

    Date acquired April 2016
    Total mileage 80,134
    Mileage this month 100
    Costs this month £853 roll-cage £360 strut brace
    £26 dinner for Will and his dad
    mpg this month 24.3

    ‘The 993 is starting to become my ultimate fast road package and I can’t wait to get on the road’
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    No more slip, just more grip

    CAR: #1973-Porsche-911S-2.4-Targa / #1973 / #Porsche-911S-2.4-Targa / #1973-Porsche-911S-2.4 / #Porsche-911S-Targa / #Porsche-911-Targa / #Porsche-911 / #Porsche /

    OWNER: Robert Coucher

    As mentioned last month I took my Porsche 911 2.4S Targa up to Prill Porsche Classics, where Andy attended to the fuel tank, suspension bushes, tuned the fuel injection and exacted a few other tweaks.

    But I didn’t have room to mention another important fix. The tyres. The Targa arrived from Australia wearing a nice-looking set of 195/60x15 Pirellis. Lots of tread and in fine condition. With the car up at the workshop, Andy called to tell me he’d date-checked the Pirellis and found they were 11 years old! No great surprise, as the 911 spent its life in dry, speed-restricted Sydney, where tyre performance is not so critical.

    I have a bit of a fixation about tyres, especially fitted to classics. Original tyres are narrow and high-profile so have a smaller footprint than modern, wide, low-profiles. So you really need classic tyres to be fresh and grippy, not hard and slippery. I’d noticed on a rally and at an Octane trackday at Goodwood that the 911 felt rather twitchy coming out of corners under power. I now know why.

    I called Dougal Cawley of Longstone Classic #Tyres to order some fresh rubber. Dougal pointed out that 195 Pirelli 6000s are wrong and that I needed a set of original-equipment Pirelli Cinturato 185/70VR15 CN36s for optimum handling. At £179 each (£799 for a set of five) plus the Vodka And Tonic, Dougal sent the set to Prill. Longstone doesn’t charge delivery in UK, Europe and most other countries.

    Combined with the replaced suspension bushes, the new Cinturatos offer a great improvement and the Porsche now rides superbly. There’s no more crashing over transverse ridges, the ride is quieter and the grip hugely increased. On top of that, the previously good steering is now even better, with sharper turn-in and lighter feel.

    A very satisfying result, which demonstrates the difference a decent set of fresh, correct-spec tyres can make. I’d suggest you check yours (date-stamped on the sidewall) and, if they’re more than six years old, a new set will transform your classic.

    Thanks to Dougal Cawley, www.longstonetyres.co.uk; and Andy Prill, www.prillporscheclassics.com.
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    CHASING CARS Russ Smith’s market analysis / #Porsche-911-Carrera-RS / #Porsche-911-Carrera-964 / #Porsche-911-964 / #Porsche-911 / #Porsche-964 / #Porsche /

    But we’ll always have Paris...

    Weather takes the spring out of UK sales results after an optimistic start to the year

    Following on from the two very successful season-opening sales we reported on last month, and an average sales rate of 77 per cent for the 343 cars shared by Bonhams, RM and Artcurial in the Paris triple-header, things have cooled a little. Mind you, the late February/early March snowy weather didn’t help. Silverstone sold exactly two-thirds of the 69 lots at its downsized classic sale held at Race Retro. Against that, Historics hitting 65.3 per cent for the cars at its Ascot sale – which people struggled to get to – looks quite an achievement. Thank goodness for internet bidding, plus a fat catalogue of 147 cars. It would have done even better without the 13 Porsches, eight of which failed to sell on the day. But there’s still demand for the special stuff, like the pictured 1992 964 Carrera RS. With a warranted 17,822 miles this collector’s piece made £280,000 against a £250,000 top estimate.

    Prime #Porsche-911-Carrera-RS-964 was a rare performer in more aspects than one.

    Historics’ Ascot sale, on March 3, was hampered by the extreme weather.
    Poor sales of Porsches also handicapped the percentages

    SOLD WITHIN ESTIMATE 29.2%
    SOLD NO RESERVE 30.5%
    NOT SOLD 10.6%
    2.8% SOLD BELOW ESTIMATE
    SOLD ABOVE ESTIMATE 26.9%
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    CAR: #Porsche-911-Carrera-993 / #Porsche-911-Carrera / #Porsche-911-993 / #Porsche-993 / #Porsche / #Porsche-911 /

    A weekend behind the wheel gives our 993’s upgrades – and its natural talents – a chance to shine…

    The 911 had been parked up for what felt like years waiting for available funds to replace two leaking valve covers – a common problem with the 993 Carrera. Thankfully I managed to save up enough to get the job carried out by RPM Technik just in time for a recent driving weekend with some colleagues and friends.

    You may remember Jordan Katsianis, custodian of our DS 3 Performance, briefly mentioning this outing in last month’s Fast Fleet. Our plan was simple: bring a car – your own if possible – and head to the best driving roads that south Wales has to offer.

    Gathering in a service station early on a Saturday morning for a quick coffee and a Danish, we had an eclectic turnout, ranging from a Saab 9000 Aero to a Cayman GT4.

    The weather appeared to be against us at first, turning tragic as soon as we crossed the Severn Bridge into Wales, but we decided to tough it out and carry on with our plan, and to our amazement the rain and clouds gradually faded as we got closer to our first location, the skies eventually giving way to bright sunshine.

    After my first half an hour or so on interesting roads I had to concede that the 993 was a little too stiffly sprung, but this was easily fixed by adjusting the Öhlins dampers to softer settings. Fifteen minutes later I was tackling the same corners again, now with more pace and confidence.

    Another adjustable component that showed its worth in Wales was the Rennline pedal set that I have recently added. The standard pedals in the 993 make it hard to properly heel and toe, because the floorhinged accelerator is so low compared with the brake, but these aluminium replacements solve that by allowing you to independently set the height and lateral position of the accelerator. The only issue I had was with the optional extension plates for the accelerator, which are designed to close the gap to the brake pedal even further. There’s an upper and a lower one, but as you can see in the picture, I only have the lower one (the red bit) fitted, because if you’re wearing regular shoes of around size 10 or larger, you can easily end up unintentionally applying pressure to the brake and accelerator simultaneously.

    As more miles passed beneath the 993’s wheels, I began to understand how to use the car’s rear weight bias to my advantage, but at the same time it also became clear that real mastery of this car can’t be achieved in a weekend. But that’s what I love about the 993 – just how involving it is. You feel like an integral part of covering ground quickly in it. No traction control. No stability control. No active suspension. Just intense driving pleasure.

    With the non-stop feedback through the steering wheel and seat, you can eventually get to a stage where your concentration level is so high and your movements – gearchanges, steering, road placement – become so fluent that when you do finally come to a stop you can’t really identify the single great moment of the drive. Give it a moment, though, and you realise that this is because the whole journey was perfect.

    Over the weekend I must have driven more than 400 miles, filled up twice and spent the equivalent of a cheap weekend break abroad, but making the effort to travel to decent roads in a car like the 993 is totally worth it, and I can’t wait to do it again.

    Aston Parrott (@AstonParrott)
    Date acquired April 2016
    Total mileage 80,034
    Mileage this month 481
    Costs this month £605 valve cover replacement £300 pedals
    Mpg this month 24.1

    Above: adjustable pedals make for perfect heel and toe action.

    Below: 993 and friends in Wales.

    ‘I love how involving the 993 is. You feel like an integral part of covering ground quickly in it’
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    CAR: #Porsche-911E / #Porsche-911 / #1972-Porsche-911E / #Porsche / #Porsche-911-2.4E
    Year of manufacture #1972
    Recorded mileage 3226km
    Asking price £119,995
    Vendor Cotswold Collectors Cars, near Bibury, Gloucestershire; tel: 01242 821600; www.cotswoldcars.com

    WHEN IT WAS NEW
    Price £4827
    Max power 165bhp / DIN
    Max torque 152lb ft / DIN
    0-60mph 8.9 secs
    Top speed 137mph
    Mpg 17-23

    This ’1973 model-year 2.4E, with comfort pack and S gauges, was resprayed from a metallic green before it left France in 2002, and in this ownership from ’14 has been painted by Riviera Coachworks, part of a refurbishment that included a £25,000 Autofarm engine rebuild. The finish is even, but with a few polish marks on the bonnet and window trims, plus a tiny chip on the left rain gutter. The brightwork, including the sill trims, looks good bar a few blemishes, but the driving lamp reflectors are starting to corrode. The front wing bolts were off for the repaint; the strut bolts are undisturbed.

    It now has Fuchs alloys, though it originally came with cookie-cutters that are still with the car, shod with 2005 (f) and 2010 (r) Michelins, behind which the discs look recent. The spacesaver spare wheel is unused and there’s a jack and tools, plus a cut-off for the twin batteries but no compressor evident, and the gas struts are too weak to hold the lid open.

    Inside, the smart vinyl looks original and the carpets are probably repros. The headlining is excellent and the original Blaupunkt radio still works, as does the clock. The windows work, but slowly. The motor is clean and tidy, with its shroud painted body colour. It wears new exhausts and heat exchangers, plus there are fresh Nylocs and oil-return pipes. It also has the later hydraulic cam-chain tensioners fitted, a typical Autofarm touch. The oil is clean, and the filter is marked 14.5.17 and 584km.

    The injected flat-six starts after a brief churn and settles to a slowish tickover. It behaves just as a healthy small-bumper 911 should, with a taut, supple ride, no suspension clonks and that wonderfully communicative steering, tracking straight and with smooth brakes that don’t pull. When warm, it shows slightly more than the expected 4bar of oil pressure at 4000rpm – about 4.5 – and feels peppier than a standard 165bhp 2.4E, so it may have been rebuilt with extra enthusiasm or S cams. Excellent.

    This sweet 911 comes with a comprehensive history file, American and European manuals and a spare key, plus MoT until June.

    SUMMARY

    EXTERIOR Fine paint; a few polish marks
    INTERIOR Some new; all wearing well
    MECHANICALS Very healthy rebuilt engine

    VALUE 6/10
    For Super condition; goes well
    Against Not the original (darker) colour, but #Viper-Green is nicer

    SHOULD I BUY IT?
    If you want a highly original Porsche 911, as good as an S, it should be on your list. The similar, ex-John Fitzpatrick car sold at auction for similar money, but was poor cosmetically.
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    There are forms that can only be changed very cautiously, because icons must be immediately recognizable as such. If there is a revolution, then please especially under the sheet metal and in the interior, where Porsche wants to surprise us with a new operating concept and additional assistance systems. #Porsche-911-992 / #2019-Porsche-911-992 / #Porsche-992 / #Porsche-911 / #Porsche / #2019 / #Porsche-911-Turbo / #Porsche-911-Turbo-992 / #Porsche-911-Carrera / #Porsche-911-Carrera-992 / #2020 / #Porsche-911-Carrera-S / #Porsche-911-Carrera-S-992

    An icon at the crossroads: How do innovations like the plug-in hybrid and digitization change the rear-engined classic with the sawing voice and the impossible weight distribution? We have the story - for those who do not want to wait until October 2018.

    Beetle, Mini, Land Rover, 911. All classic without expiration date - or the last Mohicans before the big paradigm shift towards E-Mobility and autonomous driving?

    Probably something of both. Porsche has to take care of the 911 without scare the purists and ignore the signs of the times. "In the 911 there will be no four-cylinder in the medium term," promises chief conductor Oliver Blume. "But we are working on a plug-in variant and will probably use it later." What Blume does not say: Model 992, which debuts at the LA Auto Show in late 2018, is the last of its kind. Because the generation after next generation is already based on the completely new, in all essential elements scalable sports car platform of the future (SAZ), which was developed earlier this year. Lamborghini remains initially out, but Bentley, Audi and probably even Bugatti are considered set in the SAZ network.

    Before the eighth in Zuffenhausen conceived rolls from February 2019 to the dealers, Porsche still wants to tell the story of the 991 to an end.

    The penultimate chapter takes place in March at the Geneva Motor Show, where the winged GT3 RS, which is said to have 520 hp, celebrates its premiere. As part of the racing reunion, a classic event scheduled for September near Paris, Porsche wants to draw the last 991 derivative from the hat in the form of the strictly limited Speedster GT.

    After the 911 T, the Speedster is the second model in the Heritage range. The next 911 generation hears the abbreviation 992 and builds in essential elements on the current series. So it remains at the rear engine - the rumored exchange of boxer and transmission should be completed in 2025 with the so-called Ferrari Fighter (Project 960), the future of course, is still uncertain. Since the duo 996/986, Elfer and Boxster / Cayman share a modular architecture. This constructive approach is in principle, but it is still unclear to what extent the successors of Cayman and Boxster are knitted after the proven pattern and whether Audi is allowed on board. As of December 2017, everything from the big facelift to the radically innovative electric sports car is in the realm of possibility.

    The new 911 is born in uncertain times. As early as next fall, legislators are tightening the exhaust gas standard for gasoline engines with the Otto Particulate Filter (OPF). The measures to comply with the two-stage RDE (Real Drive Emissions) limits cost engine power and money. Quite possibly, that's why Porsche also takes the BMW M-way in the next step and has to provide the expensive water injection. Against the background of the exhaust gas discussion, the classic naturally aspirated engines of GT3 and GT4 inevitably become discontinued models.

    Because at the same time more stringent noise protection regulations threaten, also the intake and exhaust systems must be quieter. A tightening on a broad front brings the upcoming fleet norm of on average only 95 g CO2 / km. But do not worry: the enemy picture of a 911 with four-cylinder boxer without e-module is a chimera, at least in the medium term.

    The graduated start-up of the 992 is based on its predecessor:

    • Carrera 2S and Carrera 4S Coupé, Presentation 10/2018, launch 2/2019;
    • Carrera 2S and 4S Cabriolet, presentation 1/2019, sale from 4/2019;
    • Carrera 2 and Carrera 4 as coupé and convertible, presentation 4/2019, at the dealer 7/2019;
    • 911 Turbo Coupe and Carrera GTS, presentation 9/2019, start of sales 2/2020.


    Together with the new car, a revised engine generation (EA9A2) goes into production.

    The 3.0-liter boxer mobilizes as #MHEV (Mild Hybrid) 15 kW more power and 70 Newton meters more torque, provides additional variability in the mixture preparation and reduces the already hardly measurable particulate matter emission by a factor of 10. The base Carrera 400 PS Strong twin-turbo propellant brings it in the S versions to 450 hp. From 2022 will be increased as part of the facelift again by 20 hp.

    In the GT3 successor it remains at 3.8 liters of displacement, but the first-ever artificially ventilated six-cylinder in the sharpest 911 should increase in the first stage of development from 500 to 550 hp. Spearhead of the series remains the 911 Turbo; he stands with up to 620 bhp / DIN even better in the feed than before. In most cases, a new eight-speed double clutch (8DT 80HL) from ZF will provide the power transmission.

    Inside there's an exciting mixture of classic and modern. Porsche was the only mechanical round instrument to rescue the centrally positioned tachometer into modern times. Although it remains at a total of five clocks, but the two displays on the left and right of the heart rate monitor can be partially configure freely. We know the big touch screen and the panel for the air conditioning from the Panamera. New are the optional head-up display and a long list of comfort and safety features. For example, the adaptive laser light, which illuminates far into the next bend, cleverly avoids reflections and self-glare, selectively illuminates pedestrians and animals, and works its way 700 meters into the darkness wherever it is possible.

    Starting in 2022, the countdown for the 911 #PHEV is underway, but the market launch has not yet been fixed. This model integrates two propulsion concepts: the gasoline rear engine and the electric motor, which turns this 911 into a low-emission 4x4 coupe when needed. The compact E-package consists of four elements: power electronics, lithium-ion battery with 10.8 kWh, Stromer with 70 kW and 310 Nm and a special e-transmission with eight gears, freewheel and recuperation. In total, extrapolated 485 hp and 760 Nm are available. That should be enough to track to (0-62MPH) 0-100 kmh in less than 3.5 seconds and to be 315kph fast.

    Depending on the driving style, the electric range should be up to 50 kilometers. If you like rushing rather than gliding, you can boost for 20 seconds at the touch of a button or swear all the drive components up in Sport Plus for maximum performance - then the Sport Response Button finally makes sense.

    The #Porsche-911-992 has to be able to do better than its predecessor, has to be faster and more agile, at the same time wilder and more confident, quieter and - in spite of the Otto particle filter - more efficient. The means to an end: less weight, a stiffer body and a new eight-speed #PDK for the more powerful boxer. There's a new infotainment and various assistance systems. First test runs from February 2019 .
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