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  •   time2000 reacted to this post about 7 months ago
    2018 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS 982C
    •   Cars
    •   Thursday, 28 December 2017
    Meanwhile in Stuttgart. Again, GTS trim makes for a supreme Cayman… Words Kyle Fortune.
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  •   time2000 reacted to this post about 9 months ago
    When we sold the house that put the money in the bank that allowed us to buy the 993, everyone thought we were nuts. I’ll admit that looking at the estate agent’s pictures had me wondering what we were doing, but I’ve honestly no regrets on the move, particularly as it allowed me four years of 993 ownership.

    Kyle Fortune
    Warwickshire, UK
    Model: #Porsche-911-Carrera-2-993 / #Porsche-911-Carrera-2 / #Porsche-911-Carrera / #Porsche-911-Carrera-993 / #Porsche-911-993 / #Porsche-911 / #Porsche-993 / #Porsche / #1994-Porsche-911-Carrera-2-993
    Year #1994
    Acquired December 2014

    I seem to be having much the same discussions around the 993, with everyone saying I’m mad to sell it. For us it’s the right time to do so. There was a bit of a wobble when I popped into Sports Purpose and it was being detailed by Richard Tipper of Perfection Valet. Richard is a bit of a legend in our little car world, his clients trusting him with some of the most ridiculously exotic super, sports, road, race and rally cars.

    He’s detailed more £1m+ cars than imaginable, the word ‘Tippered’ entering many motoring enthusiasts’ lexicon to describe his work. To say it was transformational on the 993 is to do the job he did on it a disservice – it really did look like a new car. Inside and out, the 993 looks sensational, Tipper spending an entire day to get it looking so good.

    Now it’s looking perfect there are a couple of small jobs that need doing to have it completely ready for sale. The rear chassis legs are getting some attention as we speak, and a new set of discs are going on the front. Like the house we sold that allowed its purchase, the 993 will never have looked, or felt better when I eventually relinquish the keys to it. I even went through the service history and tidied it all up in date order in a new folder.

    All I can hope is that it goes to someone who’ll enjoy it as much as I have; it really is a lovely example. Yes, I know, I would say that, but then I do get to drive a lot of them. That’s partly why parting with it won’t be too heart-wrenching, as I’m lucky enough to drive all manner of 911s and write about them on these pages – as well as other cars elsewhere. With a new baby arriving in a few weeks I’ll be too exhausted to miss the 993. At least that’s what I keep telling myself while everyone else continues to say I’m mad…
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  •   Dan Furr reacted to this post about 1 year ago
    Kyle Fortune posted a new blog post in Porsche 911 992
    “The familiar 911 traits of adjustability thanks to its rear-mounted engine are clear” 992 first drive We get in the newest generation of 911 and pit the S and 4S against one another on track Drive-My is one of the first to get behind the wheel of the new 992 with a Carrera S vs 4S track test Written by Kyle Fortune. Photography by Richard Pardon.
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  •   Andy Talbot reacted to this post about 1 year ago
    Taking the 911 to a whole new level

    Kyle Fortune tests Porsche’s latest ’Ring-meister: the 211mph #Porsche-911-GT2-RS-991.2 / #Porsche-911-GT2-RS-991 / #Porsche-911 / #Porsche-991 / #Porsche-991.2 / #Porsche-911-991 / #Porsche-911-991.2 / #Porsche / #2017 / #Porsche-911-GT2-RS / #Porsche-911-GT2-RS-991 / #Porsche-911-GT2-RS-991.2 / #Porsche-911-GT2 / #Porsche-911-GT2-991 / #2018 / #2018-Porsche-911-GT2-RS-991.2

    There was a gap in the traffic and suddenly we were travelling at 180mph before a slow-moving truck prevented bigger numbers appearing. The car was a prototype 911 GT2 RS. When he’d pushed the accelerator to the floor, Andreas Preuninger, Porsche’s GT product line director, calmly said there’d be more to come from the production cars. Goodness.

    Now, a few months later, I’m sitting in one. It is ‘the alpha 911’, as the GT man said during that prototype ride. You only need to look at it to see that. It’s a vented, ducted, bewinged, carbonfibre lightweight monster, that is in no way shy in exhibiting its intent.

    The GT2 RS has always been a little bit unhinged, and this one is no exception. Rare, exclusive, collectable, but a car sought out by those who want not only low-number bragging rights but also the fastest, most outrageous 911 Porsche builds.

    The formula remains the same, the GT2 RS taking elements of the GT3 RS and the Turbo S and adding new, exotic technology to the mix. It’s got a 3.8-litre bi-turbo flat-six with water-cooling on the charge air system, bespoke internals and a titanium exhaust. Power is up to 700bhp. Yes, a 700bhp 911. Driving the rear wheels only.

    There’s PDK now, a seven-speed auto insetad of its predecessor’s six-speed manual. Being faster, paddleshifts are the RS way. Frankly, with that much horsepower, it’s probably sensible. There’s less weight, as you’d expect with the RS badge, but the GT2 RS’s 1475kg kerb-weight can be reduced by a further 29kg if you lighten your wallet by £21,000 for the Weissach package. You get magnesium wheels, a carbonfibre roof and bonnet with body-coloured stripe, a titanium rollcage and anti-roll bar and coupling rods in carbonfibre. We can’t imagine anyone won’t.

    Inside, as standard, there are bright red, body-hugging Alcantara lightweight sports seats and a little less sound deadening. You hear the engine and find it lacks the rich, racer’s intensity of the GT3 RS and GT3 naturally aspirated 4.0-litre flat-sixes, this turbocharged 3.8 having instead a heavier, more bassy blare. Blip the accelerator and there’s less eagerness, as you’d expect, not that you’ll notice that too much on the road.

    That it’s fast is no surprise, but it’s not the engine that defines the GT2 RS. Yes, there’s massive, linear shove, and the gearbox is so quick to translate your finger-pulls to swapped ratios that it cracks 62mph in 2.8sec. You can double that in 8.3sec and go on to a top speed of 211mph shortly after. Yet, for all that, it’s the chassis that shines through. In essence it runs on GT3 Cup settings for the Nürburgring. There are upside-down dampers, with every connection, bar a single one on the rear-wheel steering, being ball-jointed, yet that uncompromising set-up does not manifest in a chaotic, harsh ride. Far from it: the way the GT2 RS copes with the vagaries of the UK’s ravaged tarmac is revelatory, as it rides with tautness yet civility too. It’s never the chassis that demands you slow down, rather the engine’s exponentially increasing pace. The steering is rich in sensation, quick in response and near-perfect in its weighting.

    This is a GT2 RS that bins the uncouth, difficult manner of its predecessors and responds with pin-sharp agility, mated to its massive power. It’s engaging and interesting at any speed, which begs the question why it needs quite so much of it. Sure, nobody will be disappointed with the GT2 RS; it moves the 911 game on massively. But however incredible it is, the idea of this chassis being mated to the more intoxicating naturally aspirated 4.0-litre of the GT3 is an even more bewitching proposition.

    Above Despite some awesome performance figures – 2.8sec to 62mph and just 8.3sec to double that – it is the sublime chassis that defines the new GT2 RS.
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  •   Jordan Ballard reacted to this post about 1 year ago
    Kyle Fortune posted a new blog post in Porsche 911 992
    Debut of the Porsche 911 992
    •   Cars
    •   Saturday, 19 January 2019
    992 revealed Porsche has officially unveiled the eighth generation of 911 at the Los Angeles Auto Show – here’s all the info. Drive-My heads to Los Angeles as the eighth generation of Porsche’s iconic sports car is unveiled to the world Written by Kyle Fortune in Los Angeles.
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  •   Russ Smith reacted to this post about 2 years ago
    Kyle Fortune posted a new blog post in Porsche Panamera 971
    Panamera puts the boot in A bit more practical, a lot more attractive. Words Kyle Fortune. Photography Barry Hayden.
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  •   Martin reacted to this post about 2 years ago
    Ready-to-race #AMG / #Mercedes-AMG / #Mercedes-AMG-GT-R-C190 / #Mercedes-Benz-C190 / #Mercedes-AMG / AMG / #Mercedes / #Mercedes-Benz / #Mercedes-AMG-GT / #Mercedes-AMG-GT-R / #2017 / #2018

    Testing the track-focused GT4 sibling of the AMG GT R
    Words Kyle Fortune

    ‘It’s very demanding, very technical,’ says Thomas Jäger, who’s driving me round Paul Ricard in an AMG GT R and describing the best line. Demanding and technical are not words I was hoping to hear, especially as in a few minutes I’ll be strapped into the Mercedes-AMG GT4, the GT R’s racing twin. With as much nonchalance as I can muster, I get in the GT4. It’s not as easy as the GT R. I’m trussed-up in five-point harnesses in a deep, body-hugging bucket seat surrounded by a cage and nets, a twin-grip steering wheel in front, with a digital read-out behind it.

    Jäger’s telling me what all the buttons and knobs do, saying to leave the #ABS setting at 7, though to start with traction control at 3 and move it up to 6 or 7. In true Spinal Tap fashion the dial goes up to 11, but we’ll stick with Jäger’s advice. He should know, after all, having wound 30,000km onto it, along with Bernd Schneider and Jan Seyffarth honing it to be both reliable and competitive.

    That’s a tricky yet necessary balance with a race car, especially a customer one. Add in the need for it to be, in Jäger’s words, ‘easy to drive and forgiving’ for those who don’t possess quite the skill-set that he has. People like me, then, or at least people like me with the €200,000 needed to buy this #Mercedes-AMG-GT4 and the desire to take it racing.

    Indeed, Jäger anticipates demand will be high, GT4 appealing as a category because it’s affordable, relatively speaking. There’s plenty of competition, too, from Audis, Aston Martins, BMWs, Corvettes, Ginettas, Maseratis, McLarens, Porsches and more. If that sounds like a disparate bunch then their performance will be equalised by the FIA’s Balance of Performance formula, Jäger anticipating the #Merecedes-AMG-GT4 to run around 400bhp from its twin-turbo 4.0-litre V8 engine. Today it’s at 503bhp…

    The relationship to the GT R helps reduce costs. There’s a steel body instead of a GT3 car’s carbon, the GT4 has the same track as a GT R, the wishbones are off-the-shelf, and pretty much everything bar the safety equipment, slick tyres, bigger front splitter and electronics come from the road car.

    Not that you’d know it inside: it’s pure racer. Trip the ignition switch, press the button on the pistol-grip wheel and the 4.0-litre V8’s cacophony fills the cabin. Keep the clutch floored, pull the right paddle and the first of its six gears is fired in, with a spit of air from the pneumatic system that selected it.


    Plenty of revs, lift the clutch… and stall. A quick prod of the start button and the engine fires; more revs and the GT4 pulls out of the pits, juddering as it fights the urge to drive quickly. Everything about its make-up is about the pursuit of speed. It gets easier as the pace rises; the track, as #Jäger suggests, is demanding but the car is an absolute joy.

    There’s immediacy to its responses, the steering is sharp (though today there’s some safe understeer that could easily be dialled out), grip is sensational, the brakes are mighty. The eight laps that follow are a joyous mix of highs and frustrations, as it’s apparent that I’d need a lot more time and money to really get the best of it. Neither of which I have. If you do, you’re very lucky indeed.

    Below With 503bhp from its #Twin-turbo #V8 , the #GT4 understeers safely around Paul Ricard – although its suspension settings are highly adjustable…
    ‏ — at 2760 Route des Hauts du Camp, RDN8, 83330 Le Castellet, France
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  •   Adam Towler reacted to this post about 2 years ago
    Kyle Fortune updated the cover photo for Jaguar XJ X351
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  •   Adam Towler reacted to this post about 2 years ago
    XJR’s last hurrah… Final power boost for Jaguar’s lovable hot saloon… Words Kyle Fortune / #Jaguar-XJR-575 / #Jaguar-XJR / #Jaguar-XJR-575 / #Jaguar-XJR-575-X351 / #Jaguar-XJR-X351 / #Jaguar-XJ-X351 / #Jaguar-XJ / #Jaguar / #2018 / #Jaguar-X351

    Yes, the Jaguar XJR is still a thing. Jaguar might elsewhere be following its stablemate Land Rover into SUVs, but there is still room in its line-up for a flagship saloon. Enough, indeed, for a range of them, but we’re not bothering with anything as hoipolloi as a sensible turbodiesel here. Instead we’re going right to the top. The new Jaguar XJR 575, with a 5.0-litre supercharged V8 petrol engine, has a number relating to its output.

    That’s more than before, Jaguar reminding us of the XJ’s existence by squeezing a few more ponies from that sonorous supercharged V8, making a few minor technical tweaks inside and out, and painting the launch cars a fairly retina-testing Velocity Blue.

    With the model in its eighth year, Jaguar had to do something. After all, the XJ’s rivals, each ubiquitous in comparison, have all been replaced. The big Brit will have to soldier on for a few years yet while Jaguar earns enough money by selling those SUVs to justify spending money on another. And it will, says director of design Ian Callum, but like this one ‘it won’t be trying to take on the S-Class, because there’s just no point’.

    Revel in the XJ’s different take on the Luxury saloon, be it stylistically or ideologically, and enjoy the fact that even so long after its launch it remains a rarity. There’s no hybrid plug-in powertrain, nothing like the level of autonomy of an S-Class, 7 Series or Audi A8, and, really, it’s all the better for it. The XJ has always been a car intended to appeal to the driver, and all of that stuff is just a distraction.

    That’s true of the supercharged 5.0-litre V8 under the bonnet, which is diverting enough to, er, make you want to take a diversion and is worth winding up to its redline for the sound alone. The blare from those none-too-subtle tailpipes is rich and naughty, the accompanying pace never anything less than eye-widening. You’ll hit 62mph from rest in 4.4 seconds, and it doesn’t seem ever to let up, Jaguar quoting 186mph as its top speed should you be in Germany. The eight-speed automatic dishes out its plentiful ratios with imperceptible efficiency, making the paddles all but redundant.

    All that 575ps (actually 567bhp – 20bhp up on the earlier XJR) drives the rear wheels, electronics allowing it to do so with remarkable civility even while it’s bending your face. There’s a lot to like then, though the chassis begins to run out of ideas before the urge abates. Even so, until then, it’s agile and there’s even some feel – impressive considering its size and age. You’d be much quicker in a Porsche Panamera Turbo, but you’ll be travelling fast enough in the XJR 575 not to care.

    The Jaguar’s age inside is to its benefit, too. Yes, there’s a touchscreen but it’s still housed in a dashboard that was drawn well over a decade ago. It brings a whiff of old-school luxury – bulls-eye-style vents, plush leather and rich chrome – with a hint of Bentley about it. Every rival is undoubtedly and quantifiably better, but if you picked the XJR 575 over them all you’d not be disappointed, and we’d applaud you for doing so.

    Left and below XJR’s supercharged 5.0-litre #V8 has the pace to bend your face; the plush interior doesn’t look dated – even if it should – and has an air of Bentley about it.
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