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  • Ultima
    Open Group Brands 1 Member
    Ultima
    Adam Towler Monday, 15 July 2019
  • Peugeot 304
    Open Group Peugeot 2 Members
    Peugeot 304 1969-1980
    Matthew Hayward Tuesday, 09 July 2019
  • Alfa Romeo 147 937
    Open Group Alfa Romeo 2 Members
    Alfa Romeo 147 937A / 937
    Nathan Chadwick Thursday, 04 July 2019
  • Opel Kadett B
    Open Group Vauxhall / Opel 3 Members
    Opel Kadett B
    Daniel Bevis Wednesday, 05 June 2019
  • Ferrari 458  Italia/Spider
    Open Group Ferrari 1 Member
    Ferrari 458 Italia/Spider 2009-2015
    Daniel Bevis Tuesday, 28 May 2019
  • Vauxhall Cresta/Velox PA
    Open Group Vauxhall / Opel 2 Members
    Vauxhall Cresta/Velox PA

    1957-1962
    Richard Dredge Tuesday, 28 May 2019
  • Vauxhall / Opel Manta B
    Open Group Vauxhall / Opel 3 Members
    Vauxhall
    Emma Woodcock Wednesday, 08 May 2019
  • Vauxhall Carlton MkII / Opel Omega A
    Open Group Vauxhall / Opel 2 Members
    Vauxhall Carlton MkII / Opel Omega A

    1986-1994

    Opel chose to name its 1986 replacement car in this segment Omega rather than Rekord. Vauxhall stayed with the Carlton name. On its launch in November 1986 the Vauxhall Carlton / Opel Omega saloon and estate range earned itself the accolade of European Car of the Year - th...e second Vauxhall/Opel product to achieve this distinction, two years after the Astra/Kadett won the accolade.

    Relationship with other models
    Again there was a lengthened version of the Carlton (and Omega), this time known in both Opel and Vauxhall forms by the same name: Senator.

    Vauxhall scrapped the Carlton nameplate in early 1994, but the name of its Opel equivalent, the Omega, lived on, as it was applied to the Carlton's replacement. At which point the Vauxhall equivalent adopted the name change (a drive towards uniformity was taking place throughout the range) and so the Carlton's replacement was sold as the Vauxhall Omega.

    Mark II engine line-up
    All of the 4-cylinder engines available in the Carlton Mk II were the GM Family II units in 1.8L and 2.0L capacities. The Opel Omega A was offered with a large 2.4L Opel CIH engine in certain European markets, but this variant was never offered in the Carlton. New to the Carlton's line-up with the Mark II were two straight-6 engines with 2.6 and 3.0–litres. These were both 12-valve engines, again from the Opel CIH family, but later 3.0-liter models were offered with 24-valves, producing much more power and torque. As well, Vauxhall used the "Dual-Ram" intake manifold, which lets the car breathe as two separate three-cylinder engines below 4,000 rpm, but changes the intake manifold profile at 4000 rpm to increase the runner length, thus increasing total engine output.

    In addition to the straight-6 engines there was a range of straight-4s. Starting with GMs popular 2-litre family 2 engine, the C20NE, with 115PS and 125lb.ft torque. There was also a 2.3 turbo diesel available with 100PS and 160lb.ft torque.

    Special Lotus version

    Main article: Lotus Carlton

    In 1990, Vauxhall launched a high performance 377 bhp (281 kW) Lotus Carlton in collaboration with Lotus Cars. (An Opel version was also produced as the Lotus Omega.) It was built with a 3615 cc six-cylinder twin-turbo engine (designated C36GET) capable of over 176 mph (283 km/h), making it officially (for the time) the fastest full four-seater that had ever been made. It cost £48,000 – well over double the price of a standard Carlton. As a result, Vauxhall's original plans to sell about 1,000 in the UK ended in 440 UK cars being sold. For those with less money there was the 3000GSi 24v, with a top speed of 146 mph (235 km/h).

    GSi 3000 & Diamond

    GSi 24v

    Prior to the Lotus tuned version, the range topper was the GSi 3000 upon which the Lotus Carlton was based. At launch in 1986 it had 177 bhp (132 kW; 179 PS) giving it a top speed of 134 mph (216 km/h). In 1990, power was increased by going from 2 valves per cylinder to 4 valves per cylinder, creating a 24-valve engine, resulting in 204 bhp (152 kW; 207 PS) which allowed 0-62 mph to be dispatched in 7.6 seconds and increased the top speed to 149 mph (240 km/h). It was also available with an Automatic gearbox, which reduced the top speed to 146 mph (235 km/h) and increased the 0–62 mph time to 8.6 seconds. The Carlton Diamond 3.0 24v Estate was also made. Identical to the GSI but with an estate body shell, it sold in much more limited numbers (90) and so is a much rarer sight.

    Guinness World Record

    In June 1992 two teams from Horley Round Table, Surrey, UK, set a Guinness World Record time of 77 hours 34 minutes, driving a total 6,700 km across the then 12 EC countries in two Vauxhall Carlton 24V 3000 GSi's (J870 FFM and J751 DYC). The Carltons were provided by Vauxhall Motors and the record attempt was also supported by Mobil Oil and the Royal Automobile Club.

    Survival rate

    By February 2016, just 468 examples of the Carlton were still on Britain's roads, with most remaining examples believed to be the high performance 3000 GSi and Lotus versions of the MK2 model.
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    Dan Furr Wednesday, 24 April 2019
  • DKW Auto Union 1000
    Open Group DKW 2 Members
    DKW-Auto-Union-1000S
    Robin Purves Saturday, 06 April 2019
  • Ferrari 288 GTO
    Open Group Ferrari 1 Member
    Ferrari 288 GTO
    1984-1987
    Jay Leno Thursday, 04 April 2019
  • Jaguar XK120
    Open Group Jaguar 2 Members
    Jaguar XK120
    Paul Hardiman Wednesday, 27 March 2019
  • Hillman Imp
    Open Group Rootes Group 4 Members
    Hillman Imp 1963 until 1976
    Daniel Bevis Friday, 15 March 2019
  • Triumph TR7
    Open Group Triumph 4 Members
    Triumph-TR7 1975-1981
    Jeffrey Aronson Wednesday, 13 March 2019
  • Lamborghini Islero
    Open Group Lamborghini 4 Members
    Lamborghini Islero 1968-1969


    The Lamborghini Islero is a grand tourer produced by Italian automaker Lamborghini between 1968 and 1969. It was the replacement for the 400GT and featured the Lamborghini V12 engine. The car debuted at the 1968 Geneva Auto Show. The Islero (Italian pronunciation: Spanish: was named after a Miura... bull that killed matador Manuel Rodriguez "Manolete" on August 28, 1947 (Lamborghini also produced a car named the Miura, from 1966 to 1973).

    History

    Since Carrozzeria Touring, the company that designed Lamborghini's chassis, was bankrupt, Carrozzeria Marazzi was the next logical choice as it was funded by Carlo Marazzi, an old employee of Touring, with sons Mario and Serafino. The design was essentially a rebody of the 400GT, but the track was altered to allow for wider tires and while the Islero's body suffered from a lack of proper fit between the panels, its good outward visibility, roomier interior, and much improved soundproofing made it an improvement over previous models. It had a 325 bhp (242 kW; 330 PS) 4.0 L (3929 cc) V12 engine, a five-speed transmission, fully independent suspension, and disc brakes. Its top speed was rated at 154 mph (248 km/h) and acceleration from 0 to 60 mph (97 km/h) took 6.4 seconds. 125 Isleros were built. When leaving the factory the Islero originally fitted Pirelli Cinturato 205VR15 tyres (CN72).

    An updated Islero, dubbed the Islero S, was released in 1969. The engine in this model was tuned to 350 bhp (261 kW; 355 PS), but the torque remained the same. There were quite a few styling changes, including brightwork blind slots on the front fenders, an enlarged hood scoop (which supplied air to the interior of the car, not the engine), slightly flared fenders, tinted windows, round side-marker lights (instead of teardrops on the original), and a fixed section in the door windows. Various other changes included larger brake discs, revised rear suspension and revamped dashboard and interior.

    The top speed of the S improved to 161 mph (259 km/h) and acceleration from 0 to 60 mph (97 km/h) in 6.2 seconds. 100 examples of the Islero S were built, bringing the production total of the Islero nameplate to 225 cars. Ferruccio Lamborghini himself drove an Islero during that era – as did his brother Edmondo. The car is also famous for its appearance in the Roger Moore thriller The Man Who Haunted Himself and in Italian Vedo nudo (first movie novel, Islero 1968, as the car of Sylva Koscina).

    Lamborghini Islero S

    Overview
    Manufacturer Lamborghini
    Production 1968-1969
    Islero: 125 units
    Islero S: 100 units
    Total: 225 units
    Designer Mario Marazzi at Carrozzeria Marazzi
    Body and chassis
    Class Grand tourer
    Body style 2+2 Coupé
    Layout FR layout
    Platform tubular steel frame
    riveted aluminium body panels
    Powertrain
    Engine 3,929 cc (239.8 cu in) 60° V12
    Transmission five-speed, reverse manual all-synchromesh
    Dimensions
    Wheelbase 2,546 mm (100.25 in)
    Length 4,521 mm (178 in)
    Width 1,727 mm (68 in)
    Height 1,270 mm (50 in)
    Curb weight 1,315 kg (2,899 lb)
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    Dougal Macdonald Saturday, 09 March 2019
  • Ferrari 360
    Open Group Ferrari 5 Members
    1999-2004 Ferrari 360

    Modena
    Spider
    Challenge Stradale
    Richard Dredge Wednesday, 20 February 2019
  • Vauxhall / Opel Calibra
    Open Group Vauxhall / Opel 2 Members
    Vauxhall / Opel Calibra 1989-1997
    Emma Woodcock Tuesday, 12 February 2019
  • BMW G15/G14 8-Series
    Open Group BMW 10 Members
    BMW G15/G14
    Chris Graham Friday, 25 January 2019
  • Chevrolet Camaro first generation
    Open Group Chevrolet 7 Members
    Chevrolet Camaro first generation

    1966-1969

    The first-generation Chevrolet Camaro appeared in Chevrolet dealerships in September 29, 1966 for the 1967 model year on a brand-new rear wheel drive GM F-body platform and was available as a 2-door, 2+2 seat, hardtop (no "B" or center pillar) or convertible, with the choice ...of either a straight-6 or V8 engine.

    The first-generation Camaro was built through the 1969 model year.

    Almost all of 1967-1969 Camaros were built in the two U.S. assembly plants: Norwood, Ohio and Van Nuys, California. There were also five non-U.S. Camaro assembly plants in countries that required local assembly and content. These plants were located in the Philippines, Belgium, Switzerland, Venezuela, and Peru.
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    Richard Dredge Wednesday, 23 January 2019
  • Jaguar Mk IX
    Open Group Jaguar 6 Members
    Jaguar Mk IX 1959-1961

    The Jaguar Mark IX is a four-door luxury saloon car produced by Jaguar Cars between 1959 and 1961. It replaced the previous Mark VIII. The early versions were identical in exterior appearance to the Mark VIII except for the addition of a chrome "Mk IX" badge to the boot lid. Later versions had a larger tail-lam...p assembly with the addition of an amber section for traffic indication, visually similar to the tail-lights of the smaller Jaguar Mark 2. It was replaced by the lower and more contemporary-styled Mark X in 1961.

    The Mark IX was popular as a ceremonial car for state dignitaries. When Charles de Gaulle paid a state visit to Canada in 1960, the official cars for the motorcade were Mark IX Jaguars. The British Queen Mother had a Jaguar Mark VII which was progressively upgraded to be externally identical to the later Mark IX. The Nigerian government bought forty Mark IXs, painted in the Nigerian state colours of green and white. The large Jaguars of the 1950s were sufficiently popular in western Africa that "Jagwah" survives as a colloquialism for "smart man-about-town".

    In the luxury car market, the Jaguar Mk IX was very competitively priced, selling for ₤1995 with manual gearbox, ₤2063 with overdrive, and ₤2163 with automatic transmission, which was less than half the price of similar competitors.
    Features
    A four-speed manual system transmission was standard. Options included overdrive and a Borg Warner three-speed automatic box, the most popular choice.

    Internally, an enlarged-bore 3.8 L (231 in³), 220 bhp (164.1 kW) DOHC straight-6 replaced the previous 3.4 L (210 in³) 190 bhp (141.7 kW) unit. The B-type head of the Mark VIII was retained, but with a chamfer at the bottom of the combustion chamber to accommodate the enlarged bore. Twin HD6 1.75" SU carburettors were fitted. A smaller electromagnetically controlled auxiliary carburettor was placed between the main pair of carburettors to act as a choke. It often proved troublesome in operation and many were converted to manual switching . Standard compression ratio was 8:1, but a higher performance 9:1 compression ratio was also available, as was a 7:1 compression ratio for export markets, such as Africa, where quality of petrol was sometimes a problem.

    The Mark IX was the first production Jaguar to offer four-wheel servo-assisted Dunlop disc brakes and recirculating ball power steering, which were now standard equipment. The brake system included a vacuum reserve tank to preserve braking in the event that the engine stalled. On models with automatic transmission, the brakes were equipped with an electromagnetic valve that maintained brake pressure at rest when the brake pedal was released to prevent the car from rolling back on an incline, hence its colloquial name "Hill Holder" ( the actual name used by Jaguar was "anti-creep"). This was sometimes troublesome (failing to release the brakes when the accelerator was depressed) and was disconnected on some cars without ill effect.

    The power steering was driven by a Hobourn-Eaton pump, operating at 600-650 psi. It was attached to the back of the generator and allowed the steering to be geared up to 3.5 turns lock-to-lock as against the 4.5 turns for the Mark VII and VIII models.

    Unlike the early automatic Mark VII predecessor, (but like late mark VII and all Mark VIII) the Borg Warner DG automatic gearbox started in first gear and had a dash-mounted switch to allow second gear to be held indefinitely. Once in third gear, a series of clutches engaged to allow direct drive rather than through the torque converter.

    The torsion bar independent front suspension and leaf-sprung rear live axle were retained from the Mk VIII, which, in turn, was first used in the 1949 Mark V.

    Final drive was 4.27:1, (4.55:1 when overdrive was fitted).

    The sunshine roof became a standard fitting for the UK market. The interior was luxurious, with extensive use of leather, burled walnut and deep pile carpet. A range of single and duo-tone paint schemes was offered.

    Performance


    A car with automatic transmission tested by the British magazine The Motor in 1958 had a top speed of 114.4 mph (184.1 km/h) and could accelerate from 0–60 mph (97 km/h) in 11.3 seconds. A fuel consumption of 14.3 miles per imperial gallon (19.8 L/100 km; 11.9 mpg‑US) was recorded. The test car cost £2162 including taxes of £721. In addition, the Mark IX attained 30 mph in 4.2 seconds, and 100 mph in 34.8 secs. It covered the standing quarter mile in 18.1 secs.

    Autocar magazine tested a Mk IX Automatic in its Used Cars on the Road series, number 200, published in the edition dated 14 December 1962. This vehicle at the recorded mileage of around 34,000 achieved acceleration figures of 0-60 mph in 10.1secs and 0-100 in 28.8secs. The Standing Quarter-mile was passed in 17.6secs.

    Classic racing circuit

    The Mark IX's power and good brakes for a vehicle of the era, together with its undoubtedly impressive aesthetic appearance, makes it quite a common choice for classic car circuit racing, such as at the Goodwood Circuit's Revival meetings.
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    Jim Patten Wednesday, 16 January 2019
  • Volkswagen Jetta A7
    Open Group Volkswagen 1 Member
    Volkswagen Jetta A7 / VII
    Tony Saggu Saturday, 12 January 2019