Details
Anglia 100E (1953-1959) Ford Anglia 1172 cc December 1955.JPG 1955 Ford Anglia 100E Overview Production 1953-195...
Anglia 100E (1953-1959)


Ford Anglia 1172 cc December 1955.JPG
1955 Ford Anglia 100E
Overview
Production 1953-1959 345,841 units
Assembly United Kingdom / Australia
Body and chassis
Body style 2-door saloon
Related Ford Popular 100E
Ford Prefect 100E
Ford Escort 100E (estate)
Ford Squire 100E (estate)
Thames 300E (van)
Powertrain
Engine 1172 cc sidevalve Straight-4
Dimensions
Wheelbase 87 in (2,210 mm)
Length 151.75 in (3,854 mm)
Width 60.5 in (1,537 mm)
Height 57.25 in (1,454 mm)
Curb weight 1,624 lb (737 kg)

In 1953, Ford released the 100E, designed by Lacuesta Automotive[citation needed]. It was a completely new car, its style following the example of the larger Ford Consul introduced two years earlier and of its German counterpart, the Ford Taunus P1, by featuring a modern three-box design. The 100E was available as a two-door Anglia and a four-door Prefect. During this period, the old Anglia was available as the 103E Popular, touted as the cheapest car in the world.

Internally there were individual front seats trimmed in PVC, hinged to allow access to the rear. The instruments (speedometer, fuel gauge and ammeter) were placed in a cluster around the steering column and the gear change was floor mounted. A heater and radio were optional extras. The dashboard was revised twice; the binnacle surrounding the steering column was replaced by a central panel with twin dials towards the driver's side in 1956; the last from 1959 had twin dials in a binnacle in front of the driver and 'magic ribbon' AC speedo similar to the 1957 E-series Vauxhall Velox/Cresta and '58/'59 PA models, and included a glovebox.

Under the bonnet the 100E still housed an antiquated, but actually new, 36 bhp (27 kW; 36 PS) side-valve engine sharing the bore and stroke of the old unit but now with larger bearings and inlet valves and pump-assisted cooling. The three-speed gearbox was retained. Some models were fitted with a semi-automatic "Manumatic" gearbox. A second wind-screen wiper was now included at no extra cost, although the wipers' vacuum-powered operation was also retained: by now this was seen as seriously old-fashioned and the wipers were notorious for slowing down when driving up steep hills, or coming to a complete rest when trying to overtake. The separate chassis construction of the previous models was replaced by unitary construction and the front suspension used "hydraulic telescopic dampers and coil springs" – now called MacPherson struts, a term that had not yet entered the public lexicon – with anti-roll bar and semi-elliptic leaf springs at the rear. The car's 87-inch (2,200 mm) wheelbase was the shortest of any Anglia, but the front and rear track were increased to 48 inches (1,200 mm), and cornering on dry roads involved a degree of understeer:
the steering took just two turns between locks, making the car responsive and easy to place on the road, although on wet roads it was too easy to make the tail slide out.

A rare option for 1957 and 1958 was Newtondrive clutchless gearchange. The electrical system became 12 volt.

A facelift of the Anglia 100E was announced in October 1957. This included a new mesh radiator grille, new front lamp surrounds, a larger rear window, larger tail lights and chrome bumpers.

The 100E sold well; by the time production ceased in 1959, 345,841 had rolled off the production line. There were from 1955 two estate car versions, similar to the Thames 300E vans but fitted with side windows, folding rear seats and a horizontally split tailgate. This necessitated moving the fuel tank. These were the basic Escort and better appointed Squire, which sported wood trim down the sides. This feature has become a common feature of some Ford estates/station wagons ever since. The basic van variant was badged as a Thames product, as were all Ford commercials following the dropping of the Fordson badge.

An Anglia saloon tested by the British Motor magazine in 1954 had a top speed of 70.2 mph (113.0 km/h) and could accelerate from 0-60 mph (97 km/h) in 29.4 seconds. A fuel consumption of 30.3 miles per imperial gallon (9.3 L/100 km; 25.2 mpg‑US) was recorded. The test car cost £511 including taxes.
More
Recent Photos
Link copied to your clipboard
Filter Timeline:
Pinned Items
Recent Activities
  •   Shelby Glenn reacted to this post about 9 months ago
    Simon Woolley created this group

    Ford Anglia 100E

    Anglia 100E (1953-1959)


    Ford Anglia 1172 cc December 1955.JPG
    1955 Ford Anglia 100E
    Overview
    Production 1953-1959 345,841 units
    Assembly United Kingdom / Australia
    Body and chassis
    Body style 2-door saloon
    Related Ford Popular 100E
    Ford Prefect 100E
    Ford Escort 100E (estate)
    Ford...
    Anglia 100E (1953-1959)


    Ford Anglia 1172 cc December 1955.JPG
    1955 Ford Anglia 100E
    Overview
    Production 1953-1959 345,841 units
    Assembly United Kingdom / Australia
    Body and chassis
    Body style 2-door saloon
    Related Ford Popular 100E
    Ford Prefect 100E
    Ford Escort 100E (estate)
    Ford Squire 100E (estate)
    Thames 300E (van)
    Powertrain
    Engine 1172 cc sidevalve Straight-4
    Dimensions
    Wheelbase 87 in (2,210 mm)
    Length 151.75 in (3,854 mm)
    Width 60.5 in (1,537 mm)
    Height 57.25 in (1,454 mm)
    Curb weight 1,624 lb (737 kg)

    In 1953, Ford released the 100E, designed by Lacuesta Automotive[citation needed]. It was a completely new car, its style following the example of the larger Ford Consul introduced two years earlier and of its German counterpart, the Ford Taunus P1, by featuring a modern three-box design. The 100E was available as a two-door Anglia and a four-door Prefect. During this period, the old Anglia was available as the 103E Popular, touted as the cheapest car in the world.

    Internally there were individual front seats trimmed in PVC, hinged to allow access to the rear. The instruments (speedometer, fuel gauge and ammeter) were placed in a cluster around the steering column and the gear change was floor mounted. A heater and radio were optional extras. The dashboard was revised twice; the binnacle surrounding the steering column was replaced by a central panel with twin dials towards the driver's side in 1956; the last from 1959 had twin dials in a binnacle in front of the driver and 'magic ribbon' AC speedo similar to the 1957 E-series Vauxhall Velox/Cresta and '58/'59 PA models, and included a glovebox.

    Under the bonnet the 100E still housed an antiquated, but actually new, 36 bhp (27 kW; 36 PS) side-valve engine sharing the bore and stroke of the old unit but now with larger bearings and inlet valves and pump-assisted cooling. The three-speed gearbox was retained. Some models were fitted with a semi-automatic "Manumatic" gearbox. A second wind-screen wiper was now included at no extra cost, although the wipers' vacuum-powered operation was also retained: by now this was seen as seriously old-fashioned and the wipers were notorious for slowing down when driving up steep hills, or coming to a complete rest when trying to overtake. The separate chassis construction of the previous models was replaced by unitary construction and the front suspension used "hydraulic telescopic dampers and coil springs" – now called MacPherson struts, a term that had not yet entered the public lexicon – with anti-roll bar and semi-elliptic leaf springs at the rear. The car's 87-inch (2,200 mm) wheelbase was the shortest of any Anglia, but the front and rear track were increased to 48 inches (1,200 mm), and cornering on dry roads involved a degree of understeer:
    the steering took just two turns between locks, making the car responsive and easy to place on the road, although on wet roads it was too easy to make the tail slide out.

    A rare option for 1957 and 1958 was Newtondrive clutchless gearchange. The electrical system became 12 volt.

    A facelift of the Anglia 100E was announced in October 1957. This included a new mesh radiator grille, new front lamp surrounds, a larger rear window, larger tail lights and chrome bumpers.

    The 100E sold well; by the time production ceased in 1959, 345,841 had rolled off the production line. There were from 1955 two estate car versions, similar to the Thames 300E vans but fitted with side windows, folding rear seats and a horizontally split tailgate. This necessitated moving the fuel tank. These were the basic Escort and better appointed Squire, which sported wood trim down the sides. This feature has become a common feature of some Ford estates/station wagons ever since. The basic van variant was badged as a Thames product, as were all Ford commercials following the dropping of the Fordson badge.

    An Anglia saloon tested by the British Motor magazine in 1954 had a top speed of 70.2 mph (113.0 km/h) and could accelerate from 0-60 mph (97 km/h) in 29.4 seconds. A fuel consumption of 30.3 miles per imperial gallon (9.3 L/100 km; 25.2 mpg‑US) was recorded. The test car cost £511 including taxes.
    More
    Post is under moderation
    Stream item published successfully. Item will now be visible on your stream.
  •   Richard Dredge reacted to this post about 11 months ago
    Simon Woolley posted a new blog post in Ford Anglia 100E
    Twice Bitten It took two attempts, but Dave Caley finally made this year’s Unveiling with his incredible 100E — and he’s not shy about using it. Words Simon Woolley. Photos Matt Woods.
    1. Continue Reading
    Post is under moderation
    Stream item published successfully. Item will now be visible on your stream.
There are no activities here yet
Unable to load tooltip content.

Drive-My.COM MEDIA EN/UK based is United Kingdom’s top cars/retro/classic/modern/tuning/moto/commercial news, test drive, classic cars and classifieds. For car advertisement be it an RETRO/CLASSIC/OLD-TIMER/NEW-TIMER, Coupe, MPV, SUV, Luxury Car, Commercial vehicle, OPC car or even an auction car. We update you with latest information on new car prices from both parallel importers and car authorised dealers with brands such as Aston-Martin, Bristol, TVR, Bentley, Ford, Porsche, Jaguar, Land Rover, Citroen, Tesla, DS, Alfa Romeo, Subaru, Toyota, Acura, Honda, Nissan, Audi, Kia, Hyundai, Volkswagen, Volvo, Mitsubishi, BMW, Mercedes-Benz. Find new car pricelists, new car promotions, new car reviews, latest car news, car reviews & car insurance UK. We are also your information hub for parking, road tax, car insurance and car loan, car audio, car performance parts, car discussion, motor insurance, car grooming, car rental, vehicle insurance, car insurance quotation, car accessories, car workshop, & car sticker, tuning, stance and Cars Clubs

Our Drive-My EN/UK site use cookies