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Classic Porsche 911 - Surveys owners, repair and operation of 911 news stories and page model, sales and much more in ou...
Classic Porsche 911 - Surveys owners, repair and operation of 911 news stories and page model, sales and much more in our club fans and fans of the legendary series cars Porsche 911. All about 911-901, 930, 964, 993, 996 and new era 997 and 991-series.

If you're buying a used 911 as an investment, send me your address so that I can arrange a visit from the boys. Investors who never drive their 911s bring a word to mind. That word is 'pimp'. As 911 diehards, the boys don't like pimps, so when they arrive, make sure your engine is still warm, the exhaust system is making that tinkling noise and there is evidence in your tyres of some recently accomplished brisk cornering.

All 911s, from 1963 to this afternoon, share a characteristic 911 'feel', but that varies greatly in degree. Bog-standard used Coupes from the late 1970s or 1980s once delivered the goods for sensible money but they might demand some restoration work now.

Choosing a 911 is such a very personal matter. Just go for what you really want, get the best straight car you can find and look after it. Reliability is legendary but repairs can be costly.

My choice is currently the 993 Carrera 2 Coupe of 1993-98. Its predecessor, the 964, was respectable but dull. The 993's different, agile feel makes it terrific to drive and good ones go for less than £30,000 - this week, anyway.
It's the last air-cooled 911 model but so what? Later models lost nothing by being water-cooled. No, pick a 993 for its exhilarating agility, and its price.

A friend of mine paid £26,000 for a superb 1994 993 Carrera 2 in late 2013. He loves it, whether he's tootling about the shops or on a 300-mile blast through the remote Highlands of Scotland, where it truly excels. And that's no more than it deserves.

Porsche 911 Carrera RS
1973 // £500,000
The eternally great, ultimate development of the original 911 concept, it combines high performance and low weight with inch-perfect precision handling. Superb but the price of this model now, sir, is officially‘through the roof'. If you buy one, promise us you will use it.

On an autumn day in 1972 the salesman from Porsche GB came to visit our house. 'We're making a special car,' he told my father. 'Only 200 will be built, and we're offering them to our best clients first as demand is sure to be strong.' They built more than 1500 in the end, and demand was so great that, instead of management having to use them as company cars to use up unsold stock as expected, Porsche sold out the first batch of 500 immediately and had to build two more series.

Why the fuss? Because the RS is so much more than the sum of its parts. It was derived from the relatively humble 2.4S, but with flared rear arches and wider wheels (a 911 first), bored-out engine (at 2.7 litres Porsche's biggest road car motor to date), a rear spoiler (another first, and not just for Porsche, so initially illegal in some markets) and, last but not least, weight-loss that took the RS under the magic 1000kg in 'lightweight' trim.
The result: 150mph, 0-60mph in 5.0sec, handling to die for (and you would if you lifted off mid-comer) and a string of victories on every continent including rallies, Le Mans and the Targa Florio. Oh, and you can drive it to the shops.

Mine's been in the family for 42 years and has never once 'failed to proceed'. Beat that, Enzo...


Porsche 911 GT3 (997-series, generation II)
2009-12 // £80,000-120,000
The 997-series Generation II cars were terrific in their time and the naturally aspirated 997 GT3 was a hugely powerful, seriously fabulous machine, subtly better in fast corners than previous GT3 models.
A classic in waiting - bound to be a sound long-term investment.

Any brand new 911
2015 // From around £75,000
Admit it, they are absolutely brilliant. If you don’t want one, you should. Buy it, keep it, service it properly. One day, it will be a classic but, meanwhile, enjoy a few happy decades driving it. The best of all worlds.
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  •   Ben Koflach reacted to this post about 3 years ago


    With prices continually rising, getting on the #911 ownership ladder has never been trickier. We consider an underrated air-cooled classic: the 911SC, plus the #911T and #964 – all should make for appreciating classic investments in #2015 … 911SCs. Long the poor relation of the Carrera 3.2, the 911SC is now being appreciated for what it really is – a great 911. Values are rising accordingly so now could be the time to buy one – while you still can… 964 v 911T. Got a little more cash to splash on a 911? Two decades apart, the E-Series and 964 proffer alternative prospects for around £35k-50k…

    Living In the shadow

    Long the poor relation of the Carrera 3.2, the 911SC is now being appreciated for what it really is: a great 911. Values are rising accordingly so now could be the time to buy one, while you still can… Story: Philip Raby. Photography: Anthony Fraser.

    Did you know that Mozart had an older sister who, at the age of 12, was considered to be one of the best pianists in Europe? And then her pesky kid brother got in on the act and overshadowed her, to the extent that Maria Anna has been all but forgotten while little Wolfgang Amadeus went on to become a legend. It’s not uncommon, being eclipsed by a young brother or sister – psychologists call it younger sibling syndrome and it can lead to all sorts of conflicts, as you may well know if you have children of your own.

    It’s happened with the Porsche 911, too. For instance, the #996 today lives in the shadow of the arguably better-looking 997, while the 964 was long usurped by the curvaceous and supposedly more reliable #993 . And then there’s the 911SC which always struggled to play catchup with its golden child replacement, the Carrera 3.2. The 3.2 has long been portrayed as the perfect air-cooled 911, for first-time buyers and enthusiasts alike, while the poor old 911SC has been seen as second-best, the car you’d buy if you couldn’t afford a Carrera 3.2. I’ve always thought this was rather unfair, so now is the time to set the record straight once and for all.

    The 911SC arrived in #1978 and was significant as it streamlined the previous somewhat confusing range of 911s – which comprised the base 2.7-litre 911, the sportier (but also 2.7-litre) #Porsche-911S and the top of the range Carrera 3.0 – into one single model. If you wanted to buy a normally aspirated 911 in the late 1970s or early 1980s, your choice was made for you: an SC, take it or leave it. To create this one new model, Porsche took the bare bones of the previously range-topping Carrera 3.0, rejigged the 2994cc engine with reduced power (180hp) and a cheaper aluminium rather than magnesium crankcase, while the impact-bumper bodyshell and interior remained largely unchanged.

    The moniker, meanwhile, was never explained by Porsche. Some have said that SC stands for ‘Super Carrera’, ‘Sports Carrera’ or even ‘Special Carrera’, while others have argued that it signified the S version of the C-programme of 911 development. I once even heard someone suggest that it meant ‘Single Carburettor’! Personally, I like Super Carrera but am happy to accept the name SC for whatever it may stand for. Incidentally, the SC was a landmark Porsche in that it was the last 911 for many years to actually carry a ‘911’ badge – later cars all had a ‘Carrera’ label slapped on their rumps. It wasn’t, then, the most auspicious start to a new 911. There was nothing at all wrong with the SC – far from it – it just, well, didn’t offer anything particularly new. The engine was a peach, though, even in its original 180hp guise, as it produced more power and torque at lower revs than the rather peaky Carrera 3.0’s unit, while remaining remarkably free-revving and eager. Power on non-US cars was increased to 188hp in 1980, thanks to revised timing and a higher compression ratio. Then, the following year, the output was raised to 204hp by hiking the compression ratio further, which demanded 98 octane petrol. US-market cars, incidentally, were stuck with 180hp throughout the SC’s life – and Yank owners were incessantly reminded of this unfortunate fact thanks to a speedometer that read to just 85mph!

    For the rest of us, though, the 911SC, especially in 204hp guise, remains a lot of fun to drive. Its low-end torque makes the car a relaxed and easy cruiser when you want it to be but drop it down a gear or two and the engine really comes alive as it eagerly revs to the redline. Indeed, drive an SC back to back with a later Carrera 3.2 and it’s the older car’s engine that shines, while the 3.2 feels just a little bit reluctant (a trait not helped by higher gearing) and its extra power (the 3.2 produced 231hp) can be hard to notice next to the enthusiastic SC engine. Porsche quoted a 0-60mph time of 5.7 seconds together with a top speed of 148mph for the SC and, even today, that seems quite achievable.

    It’s not just the engine that stands out, either. The SC retains that wonderful lightness of feel which is such a classic 911 trademark. Sure, the non-assisted steering is heavy at parking speeds (by the late Seventies the tyres were much fatter than when the 911 was conceived in #1963 ) but once on the move you can pilot the SC with your fingertips. The rack is quick and the feedback through the wheel is remarkable. It’s a car that encourages finesse as it dances delicately through the corners. Yet it’s also surprisingly forgiving, thanks in part to the relatively supple torsion bar suspension, so long as you don’t try anything silly, in which case that rear-engined bias can bite back. Get it right, and an SC can be so much more rewarding to pilot than a modern 911 with its extra refinement and driver aids which get in the way of the experience. It may sound pretentious (and it probably is) but drive an SC hard and you really do feel at one with the car, as its compact dimensions shrink around you.

    Yet despite its directness, the SC is also surprisingly refined and it makes a superb touring car. Those high-profile tyres are forgiving and don’t transmit the road noise which is a bane of modern sports cars, while the seats are supremely comfortable and the whole interior remains solid and rattle-free. It’s a car you can cruise in all day and get out of feeling refreshed – and there aren’t many Seventies sports cars you can say that about.

    It’s a tough old unit, the SC engine, too. Sure, you hear stories of broken head studs (although that’s not exclusive to the SC) but, on the whole, there’s no reason for a well-maintained example not to cover 200,000 miles without any major work needed. The slightly more stressed 3.2 powerplant, on the other hand, while also strong, is more likely to require at least a partial rebuild by around 140,000 miles (which, to be fair, is in itself good going).

    The SC is mechanically reliable in other ways, too. When new, the model gained a bit of a bad reputation for transmission problems because it was originally fitted with a rubber-centred clutch. This was meant to reduce gear chatter at low speeds but, in reality, it had a habit of breaking up so Porsche dropped it in 1981 while most earlier cars were quickly updated by conventional – and trouble-free – clutch assemblies. The five-speed 915 gearbox was carried over from previous 911s and was criticised in some quarters for its agricultural feel, plus many suffered from poor synchromeshes. However, start with a good 915, treat it gently (especially while the transmission oil is still cold) and, once you’ve mastered the changes, the ’box is a real joy to use and part of the appeal of an older 911.

    The big killer with SCs, as with all 911s from the Sixties and Seventies, is rust. The SC had a fully galvanised bodyshell when new but don’t let that lull you into a false sense of security. Galvanising will slow down the rust process but won’t stop it, while there’s a fair chance that most SCs out there will have had at least some bodywork damage at some point in their lives, which can break the galvanised coating and give corrosion a foothold. Indeed, it’s rare to find an unrestored 911SC that doesn’t suffer from at least some rust. And once you find some rot, there’s a fair chance that there will be more lurking under the surface, ready to hit you with expensive bills when it’s uncovered. The 911 has a complex bodyshell and proper repairs aren’t cheap – you have been warned!

    Get a good one, though, and an SC is an appreciating asset. We’ve seen prices rocket in recent years. Just six years ago, I wrote that £13,000 was top money for a 911SC and, for that money, you’d expect to get a lowish mileage example with an impeccable history, with less good but still acceptable cars costing under £10,000, which made the SC the perfect ‘first 911’ for those with a tight budget. How things have changed! Today you wouldn’t even buy a rough example for £13,000, with most starting at around £23,000 upwards. Increasingly, though, good cars are selling for in excess of £30,000 with a few exceptional ones going for over £40,000. In fact, SC prices are now generally slightly higher than those for the previously more sought-after Carrera 3.2. Despite these increases, I still believe that the SC is undervalued and we shall see further price rises. Although over 60,000 were built during its production run, which isn’t much less than the Carrera 3.2 that followed, the SC is today the rarer car. That’s because, during the many years it was unloved, many were neglected and ended up being scrapped, crashed or modified in some way. Which means that good, original 911SCs are now few and far between. That rarity, combined with people’s realisation as to what a great #Porsche-911 an SC is, and the fact that earlier (and later) aircooled 911s are still going up in price, means that they’re in great demand, in the UK and overseas.

    However, I think it’s wrong to buy a 911 as an investment. It’s far better to buy a Porsche that you can use and enjoy and, if it happens to go up in value during your ownership, then that’s a happy bonus. And an #Porsche-911SC is certainly a 911 that you can both use and enjoy, while remaining affordable to buy and to run, refreshingly rare, and more than likely to appreciate in value. What more could you ask for from a car?

    And if all that isn’t enough to convince you of the SC’s worth, here’s something else to chew on. It could just well have been the car that saved the 911 from extinction. You see, back in the 1970s, Porsche’s then boss, Ernst Fuhrmann, thought that the 911’s days were numbered – it was just too old fashioned and not advanced enough to lead the company into the 1980s, so he commissioned the 928 – a larger, more sophisticated front-engined car – which would eventually take over from the 911. The #Porsche-928 made good inroads but the SC was always the better seller (in #1983 it sold in double the numbers of the 928), a fact that wasn’t lost on new chairman Peter Schutz, who also realised that the 911 was the only model #Porsche was actually making any money on, so he made the sensible decision to keep it in production. For which we should be forever thankful.

    So there you have it. The 911SC has at last been dragged out from the shadow of its little brother, the equally talented in its own way #Porsche-911-Carrera-3.2 . Now it’s time to let it flourish and thrive as the great Porsche that it should always have been.

    OPEN AND SHUT CASES

    The SC was the first ever 911 to be offered in three body styles. First there was the evergreen Coupé, which today remains the most sought-after choice, for its classic looks and rigidity. Then, as with previous 911s, there’s the Targa with its distinctive roll-hoop and clever lift-out roof panel which folds up and stores in the boot. Finally, you have the Cabriolet, which was a first for the #911 and wasn’t introduced until #1982 ; in fact, just 4096 SC Cabriolets were built before the model was replaced by the Carrera 3.2.

    Despite its directness, the SC is also surprisingly refined and it makes a superb touring car.

    A GOOD SPORT

    A popular option for the SC was the Sport package which comprised a whaletail rear spoiler, rubber front lip spoiler, driving lamps, 16-inch Fuchs alloy wheels (up from the standard 15-inch) with #Pirelli-P7 tyres, firmer #Bilstein (instead of Boge) dampers, Sports seats and an improved stereo. Ironically, though, tastes have changed and few people now want the big rear spoiler, preferring the pure lines of a standard engine cover. If the whaletail is removed, though, you should really also take off the deeper front lip spoiler to ensure balanced high-speed aerodynamics, although not many owners bother.

    The SC retains that wonderful lightness of feel which is such a classic 911 trademark.
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  •   Axel E Catton reacted to this post about 4 years ago
    PRANGED PORSCHE DISINTERRED / #Porsche-911S / #Porsche-911 / #Porsche / #Porsche-901 /

    Clockwise: shapely tail shows evidence of its altercation with Firebird; flat-six good for 180bhp; interior complete; 911 hidden for two decades.

    2015 / #Nick-Zabrecky from LBI of Philadelphia has been telling me of the company’s latest discovery, this 1967 #Porsche 911S.

    Stuttgart’s legendary flat-six made its public debut at the #1963 Frankfurt-Motor-Show , with the higher performance 911S – short for Super – introduced for the #1967 model year. The new variant had forged magnesium-alloy wheels, special gauges and many interior features that were optional in previous years. With 180bhp being tamed by ventilated disc brakes and Koni adjustable dampers, the 911S was well received by drivers and, to this day, remains one of the most highly sought-after versions among 911 enthusiasts.

    The story of uncovering this one was remarkable, a chance conversation leading #LBI to a wooden barn in which the Porsche resided. The car had been bought by the owner in 1972 and used for many years until it was rear-ended by a Pontiac, at which point it had been laid up.

    Zabrecky told me: “The Firebird’s distinctive pointed nose left a telltale crease in the rear deck that is still visible.” The accident damage and the salt-laden roads of the north-eastern United States led to the owner putting it away in the barn some 20 years ago and it had not been driven since.

    When discovered, the Porsche was complete and still fitted with many original components, including the rare 4½x15in Fuchs wheels, carpets, seats and gauges.
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  •   Paul Hardiman reacted to this post about 5 years ago
    Gorgeous Green Four-Cylinder Coupe Restored in Galway

    Back in #1964 #Porsche was a company struggling to say goodbye to the faithful 356 and hello to the faster, larger and more expensive Porsche-911 model. Long-standing customers and loyal #Porsche-356 drivers were not impressed at the increased purchase price forced upon them if they were to stay with the marque and, as such, Porsche was scared it would lose its market share. So, with consultation from both customers and dealers, Porsche developed the #912 ‘Versuchwagen’, or “Research Car”, using a four-cylinder 356 engine in the winter of 1964. By early April #1965 Porsche unveiled the new 1,582cc 912 to the public, while orders for 356 models were not taken after the spring of 1965 and production of that car officially ended in September 1965. In some respects the 912, in its easing of the transition between the 356 and 911, was the company’s saviour.

    While some may have viewed the less powerful 912 as a poor man’s 911, the 912 was rapidly developing its own fan base thanks to its undiminished aerodynamics, style, ergonomics, and more importantly, the same high level of build quality of a 911. With better weight distribution than the 911 thanks to the smaller and lighter engine the 912 was acknowledged as a better-handling Porsche and, in the same way the underdog that was the #Mini-Cooper was applauded for taking on and winning rallies, the 912 was also applauded for giving a complete driving experience at a fraction of the price paid by 911 drivers. Many journalists of the time noted that, when carrying out motoring comparison reports on both the 912 and the 911, the 912 was judged to be more fun to drive with its precise steering and better weight distribution. When the price factor was brought into the equation it was very difficult to choose one over the other.

    In the USA the #Porsche-912 outsold the #Porsche-911 almost two to one in #1966 . However, as time went on the numbers dropped in favour of its more powerful #911 brother, and by #1968 the figures showed the 912 production figures to be in or around 6,300 units, while the 911 had risen to around 8,000 units. This ultimately led to the demise of this iconic car in 1969, as the factory geared up for the new #VW-Porsche #914 . Another factor in the 912’s discontinuation was the impending United States engine emission control regulations, which would have cost Porsche too much to comply with in terms of modifications. In all, Porsche had produced over 32,500 912s during its five-year manufacturing run, which included a special edition to celebrate the 100,000th Porsche car - a #Porsche-912-Targa that was presented to and used by the police of Baden-Worttemberg. And, despite being axed in 1969, the model was resurrected unexpectedly when a limited run of about 2,0 fuel-injected two-litre #Porsche-912E models were built for the US market in #1976 to fill a gap at the bottom of Porsche’s range after the end of 914 production, in preparation for the new front-engined #Porsche-924 . Not bad for a car that was only designed to be a transition model from the 356 to the 911.

    All of the this might just give you an idea as to how rare these cars have become over the years, and their less- complicated engine and expense has seen them become collectables in their own right today, and not just “the 911’s poor brother.” John Dooley is the man with the keys to the stunning 912 you see here, which left the factory in #1969 bound for the US of A. John has always had a penchant for the air-cooled powerplant but, despite growing up, as so many of us did, being transported around in the back of a Beetle, he does not own one, preferring its more affluent big brother. You can’t blame him really, seeing as there were nine of them squashed into his father’s #VW-Beetle ! “I’ve always liked the simplicity of the air-cooled VWs and their engines which just keep on going, and the 914 and 912 models are no different really, apart from being more expensive to restore.”

    In convoluted fashion, the story of John’s ownership of this green 912 begins with his purchase of a classic #VW from the US nearly ten years ago. “I have a #1963 #Karmann-Ghia that I bought over the internet in #1997 / #1998, which was a big thing then I suppose as it was all new back then” he begins. “The previous owner had stripped the car down but never went ahead with the restoration, so I shipped it from San Diego and restored it with just a small amount of welding needed. I still have that car today”. After that John went looking for a Porsche 914 and, as it happened, the guy in the US that imported the Karmann Ghia for him also had a 914 in his yard, so he bought that and had it shipped over too. John restored that Porsche, in the process converting it to RHD (all 914s were left- hookers from the factory) and fitted a new 1.7-litre engine too.

    By 2004/’05 John was on the lookout for a Porsche 912, and despite many hours looking on the internet he could not find a good one. The same guy that shipped the #Ghia and the #Porsche-914 agreed to look at a 912 for John - for sale in California, it had supposedly come from Arizona, although John didn’t believe that as it had more rust than you would expect from a dry-state car. “I arranged to have it shipped to the UK, and at the same time I decided I would convert it to RHD so I bought a RHD bulkhead” John explains. “When the 912 arrived in the UK I went over with a trailer to collect it and the bulkhead, but the bulkhead was too big for the trailer so I agreed to arrange to have the bulkhead collected at a later date. That never happened as that gentleman said he dumped it in error, but I think he probably sold it on me”. The car then sat for a while, because as John said, it was “the scary period of 2006/’07 when things were slowing down”, so the project certainly wasn’t off to the most auspicious of starts, Indeed, it could even have fallen by the wayside, but as you can see, John stuck fast and waited for his opportunity.

    By late 2011 John felt the time was right to start the restoration of the 912, so the stripdown began. What was apparent straight away was that the “rust-free” car was not so rust-free, but in comparison to other cars of its era it was practically museum quality. There were rust spots in the floor, four to be exact, but localised repairs were all that were needed. The same was the case when it came to dealing with the rust spots on a wing and a door bottom, so thankfully no expensive new panels needed to be sourced. There is certainly something to be said for Porsche build quality of the time. Even though the car was driving when it arrived in Ireland the wiring was very tatty, so when John stripped the ‘shell Brian Dooley refurbished the electrical system. John tells us that he was a saviour as he did a fantastic job.

    John’s son, Dermot was a panel beater at the time, and he was a real driving force behind getting the bodywork done. It was finished to a fantastic standard, before being sent to Mazonbrook Motors in Loughrea to be painted. The original colour was the very dark Irish Green, but John preferred a brighter original Porsche colour called Golden Green, so a bespoke version of this shade was mixed up and laid down with flawless results.

    In the meantime the brightwork had been sent to Derby Plating in the UK, and when the fresh trim was installed on the newly-painted ‘shell the 912’s appearance really came to life. The bumpers were a nightmare though according to John, as they are very difficult to install and have quite a number of components in each section, all of which required new (and quite expensive) rubbers and grommets. With new tyres fitted to the original Porsche Fuchs wheels, the glass installed with all new rubbers and the US-spec headlights refitted with modern H4 bulbs and set up for RHD, the exterior was finished. Attention then switched to the interior, and a new headliner, new dashboard panel, carpets and one seat cover were ordered from a company in Belgium before being fitted to the almost completed Porsche. All that was then left to install was the engine, which John did once he had sorted out the completely-rebuilt twin Solex carburettors.

    We first came across John’s 912 at the ‘Ireland Heads West for Emma’ Vintage Show in Ballybrit Racecourse in Galway last June, when its bright green colour and gleaming chrome caught the eye of our editor from right across the car park. Not only does it look fantastic, but John is very happy how it drives too; a 1,582cc flat-four might not sound like much engine for a Porsche, but it’s by no means an old VW unit, putting out a solid 90bhp or so. “It’s slow to get started from cold, but after that it fires up straight away” he smiles. “You could use it every day, and if I had to sell everything else I would happily use it all the time. People ask if it’s as fast as a 911, and it’s not, but it’s no slouch and handles very well. There’s nothing wrong with the way it goes, and I’m very happy with it”. You can’t say fairer than that.

    Car #1969 Porsche 912 - Spec
    Years Produced: - 1965 to 1969
    Body Type: - Monocoque 2+2 coupe
    Engine: - Rear-mounted 1,582cc air-cooled flat-four with twin Solex carburettors
    Transmission: - Five-speed manual, RWD
    Front Suspension: - Independent torsion bar with McPherson strut-type dampers
    Rear Suspension: - Independent torsion bar with trailing wishbones
    Maximum Power: 90bhp at 5,800rpm
    0-60mph: - 11.6 seconds
    Maximum Speed: - 119mph
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